Programming and Resources for LGBT Students and Allies

by Kathryn Douglas

I was fortunate to attend the NACE presentation by colleagues from the Northeastern Career Development office on Reach (OUT) LGBTQA+ Career Conference, a collaborative program with career services, institutional diversity and inclusion, and LGBTQ resources that received a 2016 National Association of Colleges and Employers “Excellence in Diversity” AwardReach (OUT), in its third year this academic year, focuses on “the perspectives and concerns of queer, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, gender non-conforming, non-binary, intersex, and asexual students in preparation for co-op, internships, and professional life beyond campus,” and features an evening presentation, one-on-one informational meetings, and a half day of workshops.

I was inspired by the presentation at NACE and the program, and came back to New Haven determined to partner with colleagues on campus to create a two-hour LGBT Career Program open to all students at Yale University.

One of the take-aways from the Northeastern team was to collaborate broadly.  This is important advice for idea generation, locating resources, developing an audience and in effect, uniting student groups, offices, and programs at a de-centralized university.

My goal was to create a dynamic program to provide students with tangible tools to take with them as they enter or re-enter the workforce, and to encourage allies to broaden their understanding of how to be allies as well as the opportunities and challenges LGBT peers encounter in the workplace.  Given the limited time students I work with have, I tried to create a program that was short but impactful, presenting resources that apply broadly to students going into a variety of sectors nationally and internationally, and providing the opportunity for meaningful conversations and networking.

This month, our office was able to successfully collaborate with other career offices, the university office of diversity and inclusion, the LGBTQ staff affinity group, the university LGBT resource office, local community members, and student groups across campus for a two-hour LGBT career program.  Thank you to Northeastern for providing an excellent model!

The LGBT Career Program at Yale this month included:

  • A 20-minute primer on workplace laws and the LGBT Community (national and international laws and protections, or lack of protections) with David Salazar-Austin, attorney, Jackson Lewis PC—a specialist in employment law
  • A 20-minute primer on LGBT workplace affinity groups (what they are, why they are important, how to create one, resources online if working on a small team), presented by the co-chair of the university staff LGBTQ affinity group
  • A moderated leadership panel of alumni and friends covering a range of experience levels, sectors, and identities (developed talking points for panelists that provided structure for talking about individual journeys and helped panelists prepare remarks for common workplace questions and topics)
  • A networking reception with refreshments provided by a local LGBT-owned caterer

Suggested Resources:

KKathryn Douglasathy Douglas, Senior Associate Director Career Development Office, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/douglaskathy
Twitter: @fescdo
Facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/Yale-FES-Career-Development-Office/134339426609741
Website: environment.yale.edu/cdo

Prepare Now for Your Summer Interns

by Mark Broadfoot

Summer interns will be arriving next month, so now is the time to get ready. The time will pass quickly and putting off preparations will keep you from having a great summer. You worked hard in the fall and spring to recruit the “right talent” for the company, so put in the same effort for the internship. One of the biggest complaints heard from interns is companies were not ready for their arrival. The interns show up and the company forgot about their arrival or was scrambling to get things ready. Interns know when companies are prepared. You need to make a solid first impression on your interns. If you are looking to hire some of them at the end, then day one must be strong. Below are some ideas to help you get ready.

Manager Training

    • Encourage your managers to get things ready now.
    • Advise them on how productive this age group can be for them.
    • Formulate a weekly work schedule that will challenge the intern all summer.
    • Communicate to your managers the importance of calling the interns weeks before arrival.

On-Boarding

    • Communicate to the interns the important documents to bring on day one.
    • Categorize items needed to be done on day one. Do not look disorganized as a company.
    • Formulate a day one arrival procedure.
    • Summarize your company’s dress before arrival, allowing time to buy needed clothes.

Orientation

    • Construct a day-one orientation that highlights company culture and values.
    • Organize first-day activities that encourage communication among all interns.
    • Facilitate an overview of company’s communication technology, including Outlook and SMS.
    • Develop an organized meet-and-greet process among managers, with introductions and titles.

Summer Events

    • Arrange all summer activities now with a balanced schedule.
    • Purchase all tickets and make reservations now. Try to keep costs low for students.
    • Determine which managers will attend events and put it on their calendars.

Summer Projects

    • Develop the group projects with run-through prior to interns’ arrival.
    • Organize materials and advise intern managers of time commitments.
    • Evaluate presentation procedures for summers end and provide it to all teams.
    • Persuade interns to brush up on PowerPoint, offering classes or web training if needed.

Summer Wrap-up

    • Develop a summer sendoff process, highlighting learnings.
    • Conduct a resume writing course to teach how to add their new acquired skills.
    • Execute a strong off-boarding process, make the last impression memorable.
    • Spearhead a survey for interns to evaluate the company, managers, and internship.

Students talk. Make sure what they say about your company is positive. This will help with your recruiting in the fall.

Mark Broadfoot
Mark Broadfoot, owner and consultant, UR Consulting, Missouri City, Texas
Twitter: @URRecruitee1
LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/markbroadfoot

Top 5 Tips for the First Day of Your Internship

by Chaim Shapiro

Internship season is about to begin. As most colleges begin to wind down their academic year, companies across the country are getting ready for the influx of interns that will work for them over the summer.

Career services professionals will spend a lot of time over the next few weeks helping their students prepare for their internships. To that end, please feel free to share Top 5 Tips for the First Day of Your Internship with your students!

Internships are an incredible opportunity, and you need to hit the ground running to take full advantage.

1) Understand the Opportunity There are plenty of jokes about interns spending their summer making coffee and wasting their time with busy work. Don’t fall for that misconception. Companies have no need to waste their time or your time, and they don’t need cheap labor.

Companies have internship programs so that they can test drive the talent. They want to see you and how well you work in a professional setting. Take your responsibilities seriously from day one.  A successful internship is the best way into many companies!

2) Recognize that They WANT to Hire You Most interns don’t realize that the company is invested in your success. If you were hired as an intern, that means they believe you have the right skills to make an excellent full-time employee. The human resources professionals who run the internship programs are judged based on their “conversion rate” turning interns into full-time employees.

From the company’s perspective, a higher conversion rate means that the internship program was well recruited and well run. That means they want to hire you. Give them what they want!

3) Know the Company This may seem obvious, but employees tend to be passionate about their company. Make sure you know everything there is to know about the company before you start. Your knowledge and expertise will help you stand out compared to less-prepared interns.

4) Learn Your Role Most companies hire interns to work in a specific subdivision of the company. Learn the mission of that department and your role in it. Success begins with mastering your role and exceeding the expectations for your position. It is much easier to be successful when you know what you are supposed to accomplish.

5) Network, Network, Network! Network as much and as often as you can during your internship. Do not miss a company social or networking event. Attend the company barbecue, networking events, socials, etc. Try to make a positive impression on a large number of people. Your network will be essential for your future success, both at that company and beyond.

Top 5 Tips for the First Day of Your Internship is available through NACEWeb’s Grab & Go. College members are welcome to copy the text and place it on the career center website. A blog for employers on how to prepare for this summer’s interns will be published on Tuesday, April 18.

Chaim ShapiroChaim Shapiro, Director of the Office for Student Success,  Touro College
Website: http://chaimshapiro.com/
Twitter: @chaimshapiro
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chaimshapiro

Your Application Does Not Go into a Black Hole – 5 Misconceptions of Campus Hiring

by Kelly D. Scott

As a campus recruiter, I speak with many students and career development personnel about the hiring process. I’ve sat on many panels and participated in countless campus recruiting events dedicated to answering common questions including, “What happens to my application once I apply online?” and “Do thank-you notes really matter?” Throughout these conversations, I’ve noticed that there are a few common misconceptions that students share surrounding the hiring process. As a result, I’ve outlined five of these misconceptions in an effort to provide clarity around the hiring process. I’ll admit, as a former applicant myself, it can feel a little mysterious.

  • My application goes into a black hole when I apply online. We live in an online (connected) world of instant gratification. When you Google something, you can almost guarantee you’ll find an answer immediately. The online job application process is built to make it easy and quick for applicants to submit a resume. In some cases, such as when you use LinkedIn, it is literally three clicks! That said, it is not surprising that it feels like once you apply to a position online and fail to hear anything right away that your application fell into a black hole, never to be seen again, but that’s simply not the case. To ensure a fair hiring process, recruiters look at all applications until the job is filled. Generally speaking, the best time to apply to a job is when it is first posted. The reason being, most hiring managers want to fill their roles as quickly as possible, thus the sooner you apply, the more likely the chance that you’ll be considered for an interview. There is less competition given the limited time the position has been posted.
  • Career fairs are a waste of time. Believe me, career fairs feel overwhelming for both the students and the recruiters, but are never a waste of time. Recruiters attend career fairs for a variety of reasons. One being that it’s a great branding opportunity and an effective way to meet future candidates. Just because we may not have the role you’re looking for now, doesn’t mean we won’t have it in the future. Career fairs are a great opportunity to make a positive first impression and share your interest in an organization. Often times, we are actively recruiting for roles, hosting on-campus interviews shortly after the fair, and encouraging students we meet to apply.
  • All full-time jobs and summer internships are already filled by early spring semester, so it’s too late to apply. By and large, this is true for many roles, specifically finance, accounting, and analytics roles as well as rotational programs, but there are still internship and other full-time opportunities available in the spring. At Liberty Mutual, our claims, underwriting, and technology roles are still open. If you’re interested in the finance sector, I always encourage students to make sure to reconnect with us in the early fall to be considered for next year.
  • It’s bad if I apply to more than one or two roles. It makes me look desperate. This is absolutely false, if you’re applying thoughtfully. When I see that a student has applied to a few roles, it shows their interest and desire to work with our company, which is always attractive to a recruiter. However, if the student applied to too many (think: 10+ roles) in one swoop, it can look like they’re just throwing in their application to anything and hoping for the best, which is not a good strategy. When I see this approach as a recruiter, I think that the candidate maybe hasn’t thought through what they’re really interested in or read the job descriptions carefully.
  • The company doesn’t really care if I renege on my offer, they have a lot of applicants. Reneging on an offer is a terrible idea. It is unprofessional, reflects poorly on the applicant and creates more work for the organization. Yes, it is likely there are a lot of applicants for the role, however after somebody accepts an offer the recruiter declines everyone that has applied so they are not waiting to be contacted. As a result, when somebody reneges on an offer, it is likely that the recruiter will have to repost the position and start the entire process over which can take months. Instead of reneging on an offer, candidates should always feel comfortable asking for an extension to their decision deadline. We always do our best to accommodate this type of request as we understand accepting your first position post-college is a big deal and requires serious consideration.

A lot goes into campus recruiting, but it really comes down to good customer service and ensuring that there is a fair and equitable hiring process in place to ensure we find the best candidate for the aligned role. Now that I’ve confirmed for you that your application does not go into a black hole and applying to more than one role is okay, go land your next dream job.

NACE college members can pick up a student-directed version of this blog in Grab & Go on NACEWeb.

kelly d. scottKelly Scott, Campus Recruiter at Liberty Mutual Insurance
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kellykonevichscott

Five Reasons to Apply to the Leadership Advancement Program

by Michelle Bata

The Leadership Advancement Program (LAP) provides opportunities for current NACE members to learn more about NACE, develop leadership skills, and think about how to become more connected to the profession. Below are some reasons to consider applying to be a part of the next cohort:

  1. Connect. Through the LAP, you are connected with other program participants as well as LAP committee members. Contact information is distributed. There is an online platform through which information is shared, and regular conference calls and virtual meetings take place throughout the year. Since my participation in the LAP, I’ve been able to go back and query some of the participants in my cohort about matters large and small which I’ve found helpful to my ongoing work.
  2. Contribute. When I was in the LAP, we were expected to work in small groups with other LAP participants to develop a project that could benefit NACE. The group project was a great opportunity to look at NACE through the lens of our membership and critically think about aspects of NACE that could be enhanced. At the end of the process, the small groups in my cohort presented their projects, which gave all of us a chance to learn more broadly about NACE through the topics that the projects focused on.
  3. Mentor. Each LAP participant is assigned a mentor with whom they are expected to connect several times over the program term. For me, the mentor relationship was easily the highlight of the program. I was able to use those conversations as spaces to learn more about issues that are strategic to my institution, and leverage the information shared to procure additional resources at my institution.
  4. Learn. The LAP is a great mechanism through which you can learn more about NACE or an area in the profession. Having the opportunity to hear from other experts in the field through the regular group calls and presentations was helpful because it gave us the opportunity to learn about issues they felt were important, which ultimately gave us a sense of where the association and discipline are heading.
  5. Focus. It’s not often that we as professionals get to think about our own professional development for a sustained amount of time. What the LAP allowed me to do was to have regular points throughout the year to focus on learning more about the issues I care deeply about, think about my contributions to NACE, and connect with like-minded colleagues.

Michelle Bata was in the 2015-16 LAP class and served on the Honors and Awards Committee in 2015-16.

Apply for the LAP program or refer a colleague who you think could make a valuable contribution to the profession and association.

Michelle Bata

Michelle Bata, Associate Dean and Director of the LEEP Center, Clark University
Twitter: https://twitter.com/michellebata
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michellebata

Teach Students About Leadership

by Ashley K. Ritter

I teach a class at North Park University about career development for seniors. It amazes me that every time I teach the course, students come in expecting to focus on concrete goals. It’s as though they expect me to say, “Here’s a resume, here’s a cover letter. Now you are prepared for a job.” And who can blame them for this assumption?  In my experience of coaching college and college ready students for about 10 years, I have learned that students feel a strong sense of anxiety about the road to finding a job. They are afraid it will require them to abandon who they actually are and morph into some other professional self, unknown to themselves and unknown to others in their lives. Much of the course, instead, is focused on teaching students how to get in touch with their personal stories, identify what lasting character qualities and strengths it has built in their lives, and finally how to articulate that in the appropriate way to employers and others as a “professional brand.”

We know from the NACE 2016 Job Outlook Data that employers now look to leadership as one of the most sought after attributes in a new hire as well as the “ability to work on a team, communicating, and problem solving.  But what does effective leadership actually look like in the life of a new graduate? What builds the beginning of an effective leader? I would argue that it is more than leading a club or group on campus, though these experiences are essential and important practice. Teaching students to demonstrate and use emotional intelligence is an essential element to building the kind of leadership skills most needed in today’s workplace.

Daniel Goleman (2004) explains in his article, What Makes a Leader, that qualities of self – awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill are imperative. So imperative in fact, that in his study of over 188 companies, these qualities were twice as likely to be correlated to excellent performance as IQ or technical skill (Goleman, 2004, p.2). This is just one reason why the liberal arts, paired with a dose of experiential learning and workplace readiness, is still an important part of what makes candidates work ready.

We must continue to actually teach students what leadership is and how it relates to their own life and career development process. In Becoming a Strategic Leader, Hughes, Colarelli, Beatty, and Dinwoodie (2014) articulate why it is so important that leaders throughout a workplace have the ability to look both internally and externally for answers to organization problems. They write: “It involves an exploration and examination of one’s behavior, values, and identity as a leader and therefore includes potential answers that challenge a person’s sense of self. That is, these are not questions about what one does, but instead are questions about how and who one is (Hughes, et al, 2014, p.40).”

Bringing yourself to work is more important than ever! The authors go on to say, “They (leaders) still seem to fail to turn their perspective inward toward their own behaviors that support the leadership culture and practices they are trying to create in others (Hughes, et al., 2014, p. 41).  Teaching students how to engage in this type of reflection is not just paramount to gain employment but also to remain successful in their careers for years to come.

So that’s why, later today, I will go into class. I will look my students in the eye and ask them who they are, what their stories are, and what the bigger culture or collective picture is of whom they are a part. I will empower them with the courage to seek these answers. And by the end, my students will hopefully have eradicated the image of an “empty self” going to the workplace, but instead, a more whole, full, and confident self will emerge, ready to lead.

References:

Goleman, D. (2004) What Makes a Leader? Harvard Business Review, pp. 1-11.

Hughes, R., Beatty, K. Dinwoodie, D. (2014) Becoming a Strategic Leader. San Francisco, CA: Jossey – Bass.

(2015, November 18) Job Outlook 2016: Attributes Employers Want to See on New College Graduates’ Resumes. Retrieved from http://www.naceweb.org/s11182015/employers-look-for-in-new-hires.aspx

Special thank you to Dr. Christopher Hubbard who recently shared with me some of the materials used in this post.

Ashley RitterAshley Ritter, human resources recruiter, Swedish Covenant Hospital
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/ashleykritter
https://twitter.com/AshleyKRitter