Using Digital Marketing to Build Your Employer Brand

by Tom Borgerding

As an agency who helps employers develop their brands and engage students, Campus Media Group had the pleasure of working with many notable companies over the past 15 years. During the past five years and especially the past two, we are seeing digital marketing making a shift…again.

Two key elements we are seeing is:

  1. the use of digital marketing to reach students to create engagement without having to go to events, and
  2. the use of advanced digital marketing.

Students most frequently apply to companies they have heard of and have researched. More companies are starting to use digital and social media to help engage more students and then keep them engaged by using social, mobile, video, and banner advertising to those who have already visited the careers page of the employer. We see quite a few employers going this direction. How this works is by using “cookies” placed on your careers pages. Once the cookies are there, advertising can then be purchased to reach those specific applicants. This is called “retargeting” with most agencies or “remarketing” when using Google.

Let’s take a look at an example. TechCo is looking to recruit two types of students: Programming/software students and customer service representatives (CSR). If you read the previous post about personas, you will recall that these two candidate personas are likely very different. One is concerned with access to new software programs, working in an agile-teams environment and works around the clock. The CSR is more concerned with upward mobility in the company, mentors, training, and social interaction with peers, both in and outside of work. The CSR is also likely best as someone who likes to help others achieve their goals and hearing a “I couldn’t have done this without you” from a client or coworker. These two personas want to hear and see different messages. A general message about the company will not work as well as one specific to their interests.

This plays out the same way through digital marketing. With “cookies” a company is able to segment the messaging a candidate sees based on the pages they have visited on your website. The programmer persona is more likely to continue to learn more about TechCo if they show a quieter work environment with the latest tech gadgets. The CSR persona will be more likely to respond to group pictures that have people laughing, hanging out together and generally socially engaged. This may sound overly simplistic but it’s important to show your target market (i.e., persona) what is important to them.

Let’s take this one step further. When someone visits the TechCo careers page and looks at the diversity page and programming career path, they should see videos, ads, and social media posts that relate to those two things and not the CSR career path. This is possible through the use of cookies.

Without getting too technical on how this works, it is now possible to buy video, banner, and social media posts that only people who have visited those specific pages will see. It’s also possible to get demographic information, interests, and online behavioral information (similar to what Google Analytics collects) to help develop a better persona background on your target personas. That information can then help influence your information session presentation, images, content, and stories to be more specific to what the typical persona characteristics.

The exciting part of digital marketing these days, is that if the lines of communication between marketing recruitment are open, both departments can help build a better profile and greater engagement with your ideal candidates.

As always, if you have questions, I’d be happy to answer any questions.

Look for the final part of the five-part series for recruiters by Tom Borgerding, Focusing on Diversity on College Campuses, on Tuesday, August 15.

Tom BorgerdingTom Borgerding, President/CEO, Campus Media Group, Inc.
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/borgerding
Twitter: @mytasca, @Campus_Media

Using Snapchat and Social Media to Connect With Students

by Tom Borgerding

The latest statistics show that the attention span of students is decreasing from 12 seconds for Millennials to eight seconds for Gen Z and will likely continue to decrease. Digital is one of the main reasons why. The use of social media, especially Snapchat, are causing this shift. RecruitingTrends ran an article (Making it Snappy) on the topic of how to use Snapchat for recruiting. It has examples of companies like Goldman Sachs and Cisco and how they are using Snapchat to recruit college students.

The shift in social media platforms being used by students is shifting and will likely continue to shift. Five years ago Facebook was THE social media platform to reach college students. Today, it’s hardly on the radar of the top social media platforms engaged by college-aged users. They’ve moved to Snapchat as the primary platform because it allows them to have greater privacy…that and the fact that their parents aren’t comfortable with Snapchat yet. Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest were popular, but are already starting to lose ground with Snapchat. The beginning of the end for social media and youth has been parents’ familiarity with it and the self-serve ad platforms. Snapchat isn’t going away anytime soon, but the release of a self-serve platform will likely be the beginning of the shift.

Now, back to the attention span of Gen Z. If you haven’t seen it, ask a student to give you a tour of how they use Snapchat. You’ll likely see them show you “stories” of their friends and potentially a couple companies or celebs they follow. During the demonstration they will likely bounce from one image/video to another in the blink of an eye. Take notice in how fast their judgement is on which videos and images they engage, view and respond. That is where we are heading for attention spans.

What does all this mean for employers and recruiters? There’s a need to do two things:

  1. Get to the point. Your brand and messaging cannot wait 15 or 30 seconds before having a call to action. Great imagery will help, but remember the demonstration of Snapchat. It’ll give you a new found appreciation and immediacy for your message to be up-front and clear.
  2. Social media platforms are evolving. If you are going to engage students on Snapchat and other platforms, understand how they are using it. Then build a content strategy that integrates into their habits and generational norms. If you don’t, you’ll likely be skipped, not followed, or ignored.

What do you do with this information now? If you have not invested in Snapchat yet, it is time to look at what you can do now. If you are investing heavily in Facebook and other platforms, it may be time to lighten up those investments and increase your efforts in Snapchat. Content can be simple and short with 15- to 60-second interviews, announcements of your campus visit schedule, and community/environmental engagement efforts. Start testing. You’ll learn quickly what works and doesn’t work for you. Follow other employers who are currently on Snapchat to learn from them. There’s still an opportunity, but like the attention span of Gen Z, you’re window is closing fast.

If you are unsure of how Snapchat can work for you, please feel free to reach out to me directly. I’d be happy to discuss what it can look like for you and how you can take advantage of it while it’s still an option where students are engaged.

Look for part four of Tom Borgerding’s blog series, Using Digital Marketing to Build Your Employer Brand, on Thursday, August 10.

Tom BorgerdingTom Borgerding, President/CEO, Campus Media Group, Inc.
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/borgerding
Twitter: @mytasca, @Campus_Media

Gen Z Characteristics – What They Really Look Like

by Tom Borgerding

There’s been a lot of talk regarding what Generation Z looks like. In the research we’ve done, speakers we’ve heard, and articles we’ve read, here’s a recap of the most consistent characteristics to be thinking about when recruiting and marketing to Gen Z.

  1. They are Entrepreneurial. They want to have an impact, not just a job. Show them how they can be entrepreneurial in your organization and the impact others have been able to make by following a similar path. They are looking for guidance and a way to make the world a better place.
  2. They are Technology Dependent. Let them get check in with your recruiters, know where they are really at in the application funnel, watch videos on what it’s like to work at your company, and follow you on social media. Also, make it available through their smartphones.
  3. They are Culturally Diverse. The United States is becoming more diverse each year. Gen Z expects the way their friends, family, co-workers, and the world in general to be diverse. This means that your hiring should not consistent of people that look only like you. Highlight and integrate diversity into your website, brochures, presentations, and recruitment staff.
  4. They are Cynical. Overly pushy, offensive, insensitivity in marketing, advertising, slogans, messages, stories, etc. have made them more skeptical and cynical of what they hear and see. Make sure your company is “real,” relatable, and not only showing the good side of working at your company. Additionally, you could expand into “what it’s like to be adulting” at your company.
  5. They are Hyper-Aware. They can “smell” anything that isn’t real and true a mile away. They are sensitive to all the messaging going on around them and if it seems like it could be advertising something that’s too good to be true, they likely won’t respond. An opportunity here is to be very consistent and clear with your brand messaging. Also, get to the point in your branding/recruiting efforts.
  6. They are Private. They expect employers to be completely transparent about all things business, which is why they like websites like Glassdoor.com. At the same time they want to keep their lives private, even from their parents in many cases, by using apps like Snapchat that allow their stories to disappear. They’ve seen and heard too many stories about how a pictures, posts, or conversations have ruined someone.
  7. They are Safety Minded. When was the last time you saw someone in college or below riding a bike without a helmet or in a car without a safety belt? This has engrained them to know this world has risks attached to it. As an employer, it is important to be thinking about how the risk of working at your company can be minimized to help them success and transition into the “real” world well.
  8. They are Multitaskers. They watch Netflix, study, hang out with friends, and text at the same time while thinking it’s natural to do so. They will want to have plenty of work, while being able to immediately communicate with their boss, team, CEO, etc., and expect immediacy for replies and conversations.

What do you do with with this information now? Integrate these eight characteristics into your brand strategy and highlight relevant company characteristics. Make sure what you are saying is true. Highlight, talk about, and engage students in conversations regarding these topics. They want to see that your company will provide them a place for them to excel and that your company isn’t their grandfather or parent’s job.

If you have more questions about these characteristics, please feel free to reach out to me. I’d be happy to discuss them with you.

This is the first of five blogs Tom Borgerding has written about marketing and hiring. The next, How to Develop Personas to Better Your Employer Brand/Marketing Efforts, will be published Thursday, August 3.

Tom BorgerdingTom Borgerding, President/CEO, Campus Media Group, Inc.
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/borgerding
Twitter: @mytasca, @Campus_Media

Auld Lang Syne—Resolutions for 2017

by Marc Goldman

I always enjoy celebrating the holiday season with friends and family. New Year’s Eve has been a tradition in my house since I was a preschooler. Yes, my parents let me stay up late from a very early age, which might explain my night owl tendencies to this day. Once January 1 has come and gone, people discuss their resolutions for the coming year. These goals and commitments might have to do with health and wellness, social lives, hobbies, activism, and even the workplace. And that got me thinking. From a professional standpoint, what are my New Year’s resolutions for 2017?

  1. Follow the data: More and more, our industry is turning to data, big and small, quantitative and qualitative, as a source for strategic planning, decision making, and new ideas. My goal is to use data as a powerful driver for both my office’s programming and employer outreach. In addition, data will help us assess our success in terms of outcomes, resources, attendance, and awareness. And embracing external reports on trends and data will help with messaging and promotion of my team’s mission on and off campus.
  2. No I in TEAM: Half of my staff is new to the career center this academic year, so we have been rebuilding and team building at the same time. This staffing scenario provides great opportunity and enthusiasm, but it presents challenges to the staffers, new and seasoned as well. I need to be more open minded than ever before, while remaining focused on my philosophy and vision of our shared work to ensure that we benefit the students, the reason we are all in it together.
  3. Show me the money: As with many career services offices, funding can be a challenge. Having offices on two campuses only makes that issue more pronounced. I plan to explore fundraising opportunities now that my staffing trials and tribulations have ended (for the present). Whether I develop an employer partner program, fundraising for specific program needs, or both has yet to be decided. But I will be consulting with my advancement colleagues for their input and experience on this one.
  4. Reading is fundamental: While I do spend a good deal of time reading online articles, checking out the occasional blog post, and following many colleagues (and celebs) on Twitter, it is high time I do a bit more of a deep dive into this wonderful world of books. There are a number of titles on my hit list. I just have to start with one. Is there a career services book club out there I can join? Yikes, did I just come up with another idea to implement?
  5. Rudy! Rudy! Rudy!: One of my favorite movies is Rudy, the story of the ultimate sports underdog, whose grit, determination, and positive attitude lead him to some degree of legend status. Rudy’s story reminds me that I need to keep my positive attitude (no laughing, please) regardless of circumstances, challenges, or roadblocks ahead. And in my office and on campus, optimism really can be one of the most powerful motivators and messages to convey.

I will check in with you in January 2018 to let you know how well I end up sticking to my resolutions. What are some of yours? Feel free to let me know on Twitter (@MarcGoldmanNYC). Happy 2017!

Marc Goldman, Executive Director, Career Center, Yeshiva UniversityMarc Goldman, Executive Director, Career Center, Yeshiva University
Twitter: @MarcGoldmanNYC
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/marcjgoldman
Blogs from Marc Goldman

3 Tips to Build a Better Talent Community

by Trong Dong

In the world of HR, a “talent community” is no longer an unfamiliar term to recruiters. Why? Because employers want to find the most qualified and fit talent, and talented candidates want to get the best jobs, but candidates do not necessarily find the best job for them at the time they visit an employer’s’ website. A talent community is a medium enabling employers to connect with candidates who don’t see an immediately available opportunity with the company. It’s a hub where candidates can submit their information to a company without committing to a specific position.

Not only do talent communities help employers find candidates who are truly interested in the company, but they also capture the most qualified candidates who may be ideal fits for an organization. Liane Wuthrich, assistant manager at Famous Footwear, said, “A company’s talent community could be your most valuable resource. It saves you time, money, and helps you find not only good employees, but great employees.”

Improving talent communities is a necessary tool for recruiters to hire the most talented candidates for their firms. Here are the three tips to keep in mind to help you build a better talent community.

Think like a marketer

In order to come up with an effective engagement strategy with candidates, employers need to think and act in terms of marketing. They need to ask basic marketing questions such as, “How do I develop four Cs (consumption, curation, creation, and connection) of content marketing?” “Who are my target audience and how can I reach these people?” and “How can I make myself visible so that people can follow me?”

Answering these questions will help talent community builders better develop a top-of-mind brand marketing strategy. This strategy includes having a good content marketing plan that engages talent communities with relevant articles and makes people think about the companies. It also involves an effective segmentation plan that categorizes your target audience into groups based on geography, age, gender, or fields of pursuit (IT, nursing, public relations, etc.) so that you can send relevant and targeted information to each prospect.

Given the heat of social media availability nowadays, it is essential to expand your accessibility on popular social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and LinkedIn. Social media is an ideal tool for sourcing and advertising, thereby assisting talent communities to attract and encourage candidates to follow their companies.

Encourage referrals

Companies rely on internal referrals to have a successful talent community. A big accounting firm like Ernst & Young set ambitious internal goals to increase the proportion of hiring that come from internal referrals. Larry Nash, director of experienced and executive recruiting at Ernst & Young said, “Although Earnst & Young looks at every résumé, a referral puts them in the express lane.”

The benefits of having internal referrals are promising. The inside perspective of current employees will help referred candidates better understand the company culture and the demands of the position. Thus, it should come as no surprise if referred candidates stay twice as long as others.

The most recent CareerXRoads Source of Hire Report showed that referrals are effective, weighing in at the #1 spot for sources of hires.

Always leverage the long-term value of your community

Having a strong talent community is nice, but maintaining and taking advantage of it over time takes extra effort. In order to exploit the maximum benefits of your talent community and enhance members’ commitment, I recommend the three R’s steps—reduce, reuse, recycle.

  • Reduce: Communicate with members consistently to reduce costs in advertising jobs. Try sharing job opportunities directly with candidates.
  • Reuse: Re-use candidates who have not been hired, but prove potential for the current open positions.
  •  Recycle: Use candidates who are not qualified for one position for other possible positions, thereby keeping them engaged with the community.

I recommend applying these three steps to improve your talent communities and hire the most talented candidates out there. What other methods would you suggest to better talent communities?

Trong DongTrong Dong, CEO/CTO at Rakuna
Twitter: https://twitter.com/tddong
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/trongdong

 

 

 

How to Crush #NACE16 Social Media

Shannon Kelly ConklinShannon Conklin, Associate Director of Assessment and Technology, Temple University Career Center
Twitter: @shannonkconklin
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shannonkconklinkevin grubb

Kevin Grubb, Associate Director, Digital Media & Assessment at Villanova University’s Career Center.
Twitter: @kevincgrubb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevingrubb

Seven days. That’s how many days until it’s officially “go time” in Chicago for the NACE 2016 Conference and Expo. Are you ready?!

We’re putting together some finishing touches to the planned parts of our itineraries, and, as we think about how to soak up the most from the conference, we’re thinking about social media. In all of our combined years as members of NACE and conference-goers, social media has been a driving force in our experiences. Why? Because it’s powered by us—all of us. So, as we prep, we wanted to pass along this…

Our list of 10 ways to crush social media at #NACE16:

  • Always, always include the #hashtag

Planning to post on social media to engage with the NACE 2016 conference? On the fence? Well, if there’s one thing you do, make sure you include #NACE16 in any of your conference-related social media posts. This is your key to the limitless possibilities in Chicago. No matter when or where you tweet, share (Facebook), or snap a photo (Instagram), always tag your post with #NACE16 to elevate your experience as well as that of others. You can easily connect with these platforms on the NACE app! (Get tips on how to use the app, 3 – 4 p.m., Tuesday at NACE Connect.)

Did you know NACE is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year? At the 60th Anniversary Gala, you can use the hashtag #NACE60 on your posts. (We can’t help but think of Sally O’Malley from Saturday Night Live here – shhheeeeeeee’s 60! 60 years old.)

Pro tip: If you use a social media dashboard app like HootSuite, create a stream dedicated to #nace16 to organize all of the posts about the conference.

  • Know your platforms now and always

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, oh my! NACE has us covered on all the key social media platforms in Chicago. Whether you prefer visuals or text, you have options to follow all the action and contribute to the conversation on your platform of choice. Here are the NACE accounts to follow (if you’re not already), that will be documenting all the action:

Remember, the conversation starts now and continues after the conference. Log on today so you’re up-to-date on tips for the conference and other NACE news, and hit the conference floor running when you arrive in Chicago.

  • Tagging is a sure-fire path to engagement

Want to thank a presenter for a great workshop? Missed a session? Have a question after visiting the Expo Hall? Tagging individuals on social while asking your question or making your comment is the solution. The power to spark a new conversation or form an otherwise missed connection can all be accomplished by tagging an individual’s or organization’s social media account.

Pro tip: Use the conference app to research attendees, presenters, and keynote speakers to make sure you use the correct social media handle when tagging.

  • Use social media to learn and share your learning

In a session and have an “aha!” moment? Tweet it. In a between-sessions chat with a colleague and picked up a new idea? Post it. See a slide that sums up the challenges you’ve been facing at work? Snap a pic, tag the presenter, and put it out to your network. When you share the knowledge you learn at the conference, you’ll not only add value to your network, you’ll also create a timeline of learning you can access later. Win-win.

Pro tip: When you share something you’ve learned, leave some space to explain your view or why you think it’s important. Help your audience realize your expertise, too.

  • Use social media for fun (and show off Chicago!)

Throughout the conference, keep the social in social media. Your posts can be nuggets of knowledge via text, but also add creative captions and pictures. Your posts should not be limited to just the sessions either. Share the moments in between sessions, capture your experience at the expo hall, and, let’s not forget, the amazing city of Chicago! As you explore the city with new friends and colleagues, showcase the fun you’re having and the sites you discover. All of these elements tell the story of #NACE16.

  • Stay charged on the go

We’ve all been there: you’re tweeting, tagging, taking notes, and the dreaded “20%” warning pops up on your screen. Fear not, NACE has you covered with the NACEConnect Recharging Lounge and TECHbar. Amidst all the conference action, this is your go-to spot to recharge your mobile device AND you. Get your devices prepped for the next round of knowledge, and maybe even make a few connections while you wait.

Pro tip: Use this space to network and compare notes with other attendees who are also refueling. Some of the best takeaways and connections at the NACE annual conference can be made during these in-between sessions moments.

Extra pro tip: Get yourself a mobile charging unit for your devices so you can charge anywhere, anytime!

  • Post before the conference to track & reach your goals

What are you hoping to learn at #NACE16? Whom are you excited to meet or learn from? Set and establish those goals, then consider using social media to ask your network to help you meet them. Colleagues may be able to point you to a great session, the NACE staff may be able to point you to existing resources for some background reading, and those people you want to meet may get right back to you to set up a time for coffee. Put your thoughts out there so the universe can answer.

  • And maximize social media after the conference to your knowledge

You probably already know it (but, just in case, here’s a study from Harvard to prove it); reflecting on your experiences helps you maximize your learning. Take the same approach with the NACE conference this year using social media. After the conference concludes, Storify your posts or write a blog post about your experience. You may find you can make new meaning of things when you take a larger look all you picked up from your time with NACE.

            Pro tip: Write a blog post for NACE about your conference experience. It will help you reflect and could invite great conversation from more folks about, generating new ideas and new relationships. (Send your blog to Claudia Allen.)

  • Get involved in the “New to Your Network” challenge

At the conference this year, NACE is hosting a “New to Your Network” challenge, where they’re asking you to take a photo with someone new to your network. Then, post that photo to social media using #NACE16 (don’t forget to tag each other) and your photo will be entered into the NACE conference Storify. We’ve both met fantastic people at the NACE conferences over the years, so we expect to see lots of these photos in our feeds!

  • Take our “why I love the profession” challenge

And if that’s not enough, we have a special challenge for you! We’ve known each other for years, and our friendship started in the profession (via Twitter – isn’t that fitting?). We love this field for many reasons, one of which is all of the incredible people we’ve come to know over the years. So, as NACE celebrates its 60th anniversary this year, let’s show some love for our work.

            Our challenge to you: Use one post on social media to tell us why you love the profession. Make sure to use #NACE16 and mention one or both of us (here’s Kevin on Twitter, Shannon on Twitter, Kevin on Instagram, and Shannon on Instagram). We’ll be sharing your posts and your reasons could make it into the official Storify for the conference! If you’re not going to the conference—or if you’re just feeling the love right now—you can even comment right here on the blog and let us know. We’d love to see the love everywhere.

Now you’re ready to crush social media at #NACE16. We can’t wait to see you online and at the conference in Chicago!

Kevin Grubb is Associate Director at the Villanova University Career Center. Shannon Conklin is Associate Director at the Temple University Career Center. They are two of the authors of the Career Counselor’s Guide to Social Media in the Job Search.

Kevin and Shannon will be presenting a session, “We’re All Technologists: Successfully Realizing the Power of Your Team’s New Technology,” at the 2016 NACE Conference and would love to see you there! Their session is Wednesday, 3 – 4 p.m., Salon A5.

 

 

Etiquette Is Professionalism at Its Best!

Kathleen Powell

Kathleen Powell, Assistant Vice President, Student Affairs, Executive Director of Career Development, Cohen Career Center, William & Mary
President-Elect, National Association of Colleges and Employers
Twitter: @powellka
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kathleenipowell/

Remember when you witnessed students, colleagues, and co-workers on their phones and perhaps thought, “Why are they checking Facebook or texting?” Well, the fact of the matter is, they could have been checking the time, tweeting something you said that was profound or thought provoking, or uploading a PowerPoint deck slide to LinkedIn or Twitter. With technology comes a new world to navigate and etiquette requires a new way of thinking and working with others.

How did we ever get along without e-mail, texting, chats, and messaging? Do you find yourself inundated with e-mails and voice messages? Last year at the 2015 NACE conference, Lindsey Pollak shared that XX Company did away with voice mails and others would be following suit. For those who are aligned with companies/organizations where voice mail is a thing of the past, it is one less distraction. However, there are still organizations, mine included, that have voice mail. So, what is the protocol for replies?

Must we answer every e-mail that comes to our inbox, must we return every call? It seems if those seeking our attention don’t get our consideration via voice mail, they share on their message they’ve sent us an e-mail, just in case we need or want more information and want to respond through e-mail versus a return call.

The question still stands, “do we need to reply to every e-mail and voice mail?” Professional courtesy and etiquette dictates that we do! Between you and me, I try to respond to every ping, but some days I’m outmatched by my inbox! That said, I find great joy in unsolicited mass e-mails where I can choose to reply if the message is of interest, or use the ever so efficient, delete key.

The best way to handle unsolicited, mass e-mails is to find the link to unsubscribe. Sometimes I wonder how I got on some e-mail distribution lists in the first place! Please don’t be annoyed, rude, or indifferent. Either unsubscribe, ask to be removed from the list, or delete. Don’t unsubscribe by hitting “reply all.” Reply if you’re interested, but otherwise, unsolicited, mass e-mails from those unknown to you don’t mandate a response.

I’m going to switch gears to an arena that doesn’t get much attention. Deadlines, meetings, and the way we speak and treat our co-workers! I’m a strong believer in professional courtesy—etiquette. You know you are expecting a report, data set, something that is required for you to move. If you’ve promise to deliver on a deadline, respect that deadline. If you find yourself up to your eye balls in alligators, step up and ask if there is space and place for an extension as courteously and professionally as humanly possible. Being human is hard, but I’ve found we may be hard on the outside, but soft in the middle. We all want a win and success is achieved when we work together to solve for the greater good. Meeting deadlines and fulfilling promised obligations goes a long way.

Meetings! Do you find your work world is a series of meetings? You move from one to another, and let’s not forget about conference calls! If you give your word and commit to a meeting or conference call, keep that commitment. Good etiquette—professionalism—aligns with dependable and punctual. In this day and age, many of us are oversubscribed, double-booked, and rarely have time to come up for air. It’s not a contest to see who is busier, has more meetings, or who is more important. If possible, control your time and commitments. Remember, others may be counting on you and you can’t be all in if you’re physically in one place, but mentally in another.

I mentioned conference calls. Don’t be the person who puts their phone on mute and is never heard from again! Or the person who is typing, and yes, talking on their cell phone thinking they are on mute when in fact, we’ve all just heard what you think about the call itself! Research tells us we can’t multi-task. We think we can, but are brains are not wired that way. Your multi-pronged attention will be at the expense of something!

Have you had a colleague, co-worker, or supervisor who uses words as weapons? Don’t be that individual. Speak to others as you would expect others to speak to you. Being human is hard and emotions can and sometimes do run deep. Once words are out, they can’t be taken back. Come to a place where facts, and maybe figures, drive a debate, heated conversation. Perhaps, “I believe” is heard over “I feel.” Feelings can be hurt, words can hurt, but beliefs change, opinions can expand and retract. For some, apologizing is a sign of weakness, for others it is a “tool” to move on to the next item of business; no harm, no foul. We’ve all heard the saying, “people may not remember what you said, but they will remember how you made them feel.” I may not always get it right, but in my humble opinion, the sign of professionalism is acknowledging our own shortcomings, accepting responsibility when things don’t go well that were in our control, and the courage and steadfastness to make amends.

In essence, professionalism—etiquette—is how you engage and treat others. Those who exemplify strong etiquette treat everyone as valuable, contributing members to their organization, treat everyone’s time as valuable as theirs, are tolerant of being human, and are considerate and kind when it comes to people’s feelings.

For me, at the end of the day, acting with professional etiquette, integrity, means bringing my best self to the table.