Rise and Thrive

by Samantha Haimes

Samantha Haimes won the 2016 NACE/Spelman Johnson Rising Star Award.

Last summer was a bit of a personal and professional whirlwind for me. Within two months, I left a job that afforded me growth, opportunity, and some of the best co-workers I could ever imagine, took my dream trip to southern Italy (let’s chat if you need any convincing on taking this trip for yourself), and moved to a new state, 1,700 miles from my friends and family in south Florida. In the midst of all of this, I also achieved one of my biggest professional accomplishments to date: receiving the NACE/Spelman Johnson Rising Star Award at the 2016 NACE Conference & Expo.

Since beginning in career services about six years ago, I have enjoyed learning about the recipient of the Rising Star. Perhaps it is because some of the people I admire most in our field have won this in years past (they know who they are, I gush over their accomplishments and amazing personalities everytime I see them). But I think it is also because there is something really motivating and inspiring to me about professionals getting recognized for strong leadership and contributions to our field, even just a few years into their career.

Contributions to the field… only four to seven years in? It may sound like a tall order, especially if you’re newer to the field. I would be lying if I didn’t admit that there have been [many] moments when I’ve questioned myself: Am I significantly contributing to the field?  I am not running my own department or division. I am not single-handedly restructuring an office or offering consulting services to other career centers. Am I making significant contributions?

But what I’ve realized is, there is so much that goes into making positive, impactful, and meaningful contributions to the field career services. Among many things, being a leader in this field also has a lot to do with the way that you carry yourself, your willingness to learn and take risks, the relationships you strive to build, and your ability and openness to reflect.

As I said, I have always enjoyed hearing about what has influenced the path of past recipients, as I’ve tried to apply some of those things to my own professional practice. So when asked to write this blog post, I thought it was only appropriate to share a few tips of my own that I strive for each day.

Ask questions. This is something I actively work on. The Achiever in me loves to get things done, so it can be easy to just start tackling a problem or issue at work without asking critical questions. Newer professionals may sometimes shy away from asking questions as well, concerned that it might appear they lack knowledge, skills, or moreover that they are questioning something inappropriately. However, we have to get past all of this and realize that taking the time to ask well-thought-out questions will actually yield greater results. Not to mention, you will seem that much more engaged in whatever you’re working on in your office and will likely make others feel comfortable to ask questions themselves. One of my mentors taught me a lot of lessons in asking questions. I notice that whenever I ask for her advice or guidance, she doesn’t actually give me the answer. She simply asks me questions until I process things out enough to make my own decision. It’s tricky, but effective!

Become your own advocate. Throughout the earlier years of my career, I had a lot of difficulty asking for things that I wanted. I never wanted to appear selfish and I definitely did not want to inconvenience or bother anyone. This all came from a good place, but can be a debilitating mindset to take on as a professional. Just because you know what you want and ask for it, doesn’t mean you are being selfish—if you ask for it in the right context.

Funny enough, I learned a big lesson in this area when it came to attending the NACE conference. In 2013, the conference was just a few hours from my then-home in Miami and I was dying to go. The trouble was, sending me to the conference would be costly and I knew some key players in my office were already attending. At one point in my career, I would have accepted this as defeat, assumed I couldn’t attend, and felt disappointed as I followed the conference on social media later in the year. But instead, I printed out the conference program, outlined specific goals, and went through each session identifying which I would attend and the direct contributions I could make to the office after attending. I made my “pitch” to the executive director and left his office feeling exhilarated. There was something so energizing about making my case. I almost didn’t even care what the outcome was because at the end of the day, I knew I had done everything I could to try and attend. I reference this example, so many years later, because it was truly a turning point for me. It afforded me a level of professional confidence and maturity that made me realize the importance and impact of advocating for myself. Whenever I find myself feeling intimidated to ask for something, I think of the feeling I had when I left his office (and the subsequent feeling when he approved me to attend later that week) and channel that same energy.

Be genuine. We are lucky to work in a field with some outstanding professionals who are even more amazing people. Getting to know your colleagues as individuals and not just for their roles is an all-around strategy that will help you accomplish more in your work and likely help you enjoy everyday at the office even more. It is so important to stay genuine to who you are. I really believe people can tell the difference between someone who is genuine and someone who is being fake—we’ve all seen it right? I show people the real Samantha, pretty much right up front. I have a lot of energy and passion, I’m upbeat and positive, and dare I say it, am a bit of a raging extrovert. The relationships I’ve built, with colleagues and mentors within my own departments and across the country, are in large part thanks to my willingness to be my genuine self in front of others. Think of someone who you would describe as genuine in your life. Chances are, you likely enjoy their company, trust their judgement, and appreciate their character, confidence, and communication style. If you break each of these things down, aren’t these all qualities we want from the people we work with? Be genuine yourself and you’ll attract others who are genuine.

Practice gratitude. Maybe I am influenced by all of the resolutions of 2017, but I think that gratitude is something we may not always think about when it comes to the workplace. But we have a lot to be thankful for. We work in a field that makes a lasting impact on students’ lives, has consistent national attention, and is filled with inspiring innovators and thought-leaders for us to all look up to. Hopefully you work in an office where the work that you are doing day-to-day is something to be thankful for, along with your colleagues, co-workers, and supervisors. I would advise that whether you are a newer or more seasoned professional, making a conscious effort to practice gratitude in the workplace can be a gamechanger. It is easy to get caught up in the “busy season” and anxiously await for summer and holiday breaks when things slow down. But isn’t the business of it all what makes us thrive? Without students on campus, none of us would have these roles.

In 2016, when I knew there was the potential for some personal and professional change in my life, I made an intentional effort to start each day with a grateful heart. Well, I challenge everyone, including myself, to start each workday with a sincerely grateful mind. When you go into work, and you have a busy day with back-to-back Outlook calendar invites, I guarantee there is still something to be grateful for. Maybe you finally secured a meeting with a faculty member you’ve been trying to get in front of, or perhaps you’re hosting a new program in partnership with a student organization that could lead to something great. Whatever the case may be, adopting this mindset can have a positive lasting impact not only on the work that you produce, but on your professional reputation and brand.

In the end, strive to thrive. You know your role better than anyone, so challenge yourself in this next year to thrive as a career services professional. As I now settle into my new home in Vermont, post conference and post Rising Star, I am consistently striving to thrive as a professional, thrive in relationships I build with both new and existing colleagues, and thrive in my own self-reflection.

The NACE Awards honor members’ outstanding achievements in the career services and HR/staffing professions. Excellence Awards are judged on program needs/objectives, content, design, creativity, innovation, measurable outcomes and ease of replication. Win honors and recognition for yourself, your staff, and your organization. Awards submissions close January 31, 2017. Details: http://www.naceweb.org/about-us/awards.aspx.

Samantha HaimesLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/samanthaghaimes
Twitter: @sghaimes

Samantha Haimes is a career services professional with a passion for connecting and educating both students and employers. She works in marketing and communications at Middlebury College’s Center for Careers and Internships. Prior to her current position, she was employed at the University of Miami in various roles at the Toppel Career Center, most recently as the Associate Director for Career Readiness. She earned a master of science in higher education from the University of Miami and a bachelor of arts in advertising and public relations from the University of Central Florida. She has also worked at Cabrini College in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 

Why Differences Are Everything When It Comes to Recruiting Top Talent

by Kenneth Bouyer, EY Americas Diversity & Inclusiveness Recruiting Leader

Swinging the door open to recruit top, diverse talent is important, but what’s more important is ensuring that the culture behind that door is one that is welcoming, inclusive, and supportive. At EY, our diversity and inclusiveness recruiting strategy is comprehensive. From differences in gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, work experience, physical ability, and military status, we are always improving our efforts to attract the best talent with a diversity of backgrounds and experiences that can thrive in our culture.

It’s not a mystery that diversity in professional services is an overarching problem; however, we know in order to achieve the best outcomes for our clients, we need to engage diverse students. In fact, research from professors at University of Michigan and McGill University, respectively, shows that multicultural teams, when managed well, tend to be more creative and innovative, and produce the best results for clients. At EY, we have also seen first-hand how diverse teams perform better and help us create more innovative solutions for clients, so the goal of our inclusiveness recruiting program is to inspire students who are different.

So how do we make sure we are driving diversity and access? Through collaborations with universities, we are able to raise awareness of our industry with high school students by providing them with unique EY opportunities and programs throughout their academic careers. We focus on the university level to help change the landscape and increase the pool of diverse students while fostering an inclusive atmosphere so students are better prepared to enter the global work force. We also create specific programs that address every part of the recruiting pipeline, particularly areas where we sometimes lose candidates for a number of reasons. In order for our efforts to be sustainable, it requires that every one of our recruiters and hiring managers think, act, and recruit inclusively.

I’m proud of our results this year. We hired more than 1,400 African-American and Hispanic students from campuses—up 40 percent from last year, we also hosted events such as our Women in Tech Consulting Conference exposing dozens of undergraduate and graduate students to the exceptional opportunities we offer, while hearing from several dynamic female leaders. EY also participated in the first Queer Women in Business Summit hosted by Reaching Out MBA (ROMBA), an organization we sponsor that educates and inspires LGBT MBA students at business schools nationwide. Additionally, we hired 300 veterans—an increase of over 75 percent from last year—and increased our Launch Internship Program (a multi-year program that focuses on underrepresented ethnic minority students who are business majors and are at least two years from graduation)—participation by more than 30 percent this year. We also continue to sponsor and participate in Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilities (COSD).

And while we are continuously evaluating and measuring our program to see where we can improve, we are delighted with the recognition we have received along the way—from both our EY people and third parties. Internally, our 2014 Global People Survey tells us that more of our women and U.S. ethnic minorities felt that they have the flexibility to achieve their personal and professional goals when compared to our 2013 results. There was also notably higher feedback for several top factors that drive engagement that tell us things are moving in the right direction including, “I feel my contributions are valued,” and “I feel free to be myself.”

We are also particularly thrilled to be recognized for our efforts by NACE with the 2015 Diversity & Inclusion Excellence Award. Being acknowledged for this special award is a testament to our focus on continuing to advance and nurture diversity and inclusiveness in our recruiting and hiring strategies. As we look to the year ahead, we will continue to work hard to increase the pipeline of ethnic minority students majoring in accounting, as well as broaden our initiatives to attract underrepresented minority talent to professional services. We will also continue to foster a culture where opinions matter, meaningful conversations are encouraged and our people always feel free to be themselves, as that is what truly drives engagement and helps us to achieve success.

For more information on EY’s diversity recruiting, please click here.

NACE is accepting submissions for the 2016 NACE Awards program from November 14, 2016, through January 31, 2017. Finalists for NACE Awards will be notified in the spring, and winners will be announced during the NACE 2017 Conference & Expo in June in Las Vegas.
Ken Bouyer

Kenneth Bouyer, EY Americas Diversity & Inclusiveness Recruiting Leader

Ken is the EY Americas Director of Inclusiveness Recruiting. In this role, he is responsible for developing and implementing the global EY organization’s recruiting strategy to build and attract diverse and inclusive talent pools for member firms in the Americas.

NACE16: Finished, But Not Forgotten!

Kathleen Powell

Kathleen Powell, Assistant Vice President, Student Affairs, Executive Director of Career Development, Cohen Career Center, William & Mary
President-Elect, National Association of Colleges and Employers
Twitter: @powellka
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kathleenipowell/

NACE16 is over, but you’re just getting started! Remember to rekindle your connections, unpack the sessions you attended and share those with your team, and decide what’s next for you as you engage with your professional association. Whether you were a first-timer to the NACE conference or a seasoned expo goer, I think you will agree that the four days in Chicago were robust, thought-provoking, and quite the return on investment. The keynote speakers hit it out of the park. The content of their information aligned well with the work we all do around career readiness, STEAM, generational issues, and life profit! I think we could all use a bit more life profit.

Whether you collected business cards or connected through MLI alumni meet ups, LAP events, or hospitality opportunities, or grabbed lunch or dinner with old or new colleagues, staying connected will keep the information and conversations shared fresh and top of mind. You might remember President Dawn Carter challenging us to meet 50 new people while at the conference? I would echo her challenge and ask you to consider continuing the charge and connecting with members of our association. Did one of the sessions you couldn’t attend spark your interest, but you couldn’t be two places at once? Not a problem, visit NACEWeb and click on the MyNACE tab. Choose “purchase history” and click on the “Actions” arrow next to the conference. You will get a drop-down menu of options, including “View Handouts.” Find the handout for that session you missed. If you have more questions, contact the presenter/presenters. Our association members are excited about their work and willing to share best practices!

Kathleen Powell sparkles at the closing of the conference.

Kathleen Powell sparkles at the closing of the conference.

NACE16 rolled out the First-Destination Survey Results for the Class of 2015 and it was robust! The Advocacy Committee presented the most up-to-date information on FLSA and OPT changes, and discussed the NACE Position Statement on Diversity and Anti-Discrimination. The Career Readiness Tiger Team shared updates on the Career Readiness Toolkits and there was lively discussion around how institutions and employers are aligning and mapping the seven core competencies around career readiness within their work.

The conference provided Techbyte opportunities, SMARTalks, Innovation Labs, and an Innovation Challenge! Members of our organization were recognized for their dedication to the profession and their outstanding work that moves the needle for our association.

There is no doubt NACE16 was a success. That success is shared as there is so much happening behind the scenes that makes the expo hum. It’s our members, who share their time and talent with all of us, that keeps us nimble, informed, and prepared for what’s next to come in our professional work.

Kathleen Powell sparkles at the closing of the conference.

Kathleen Powell, NACE President 2016-17, speaks to the audience at the NACE16 closing session.

So, you might be thinking, “This is all wonderful, but I didn’t attend the conference.” Don’t fret my pets—(one of my grandmother’s favorite expressions)—you can find the Advocacy issues on naceweb.org! Looking for career readiness information, naceweb.org, looking for first-destination information, naceweb.org. Curious about all our association has to offer….naceweb.org!

 

Yes, the conference has come and gone, but the opportunity to engage with other members is just a website away. Don’t miss the opportunity for outreach to your colleagues, learn first hand what is top of mind for the profession, and don’t think the conference is one and done! I encourage you to find those 50 new people and take advantage of Face2Face, roundtables, training opportunities, and webinars! The possibilities truly are ENDLESS!

Building Memories

ongDavid Ong, Director, Corporate Recruiting, Maximus, Inc.
Twitter: @dtong2565
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/dave-ong/0/604/513

 

Now that #NACE16 is upon us, I found myself reminiscing last night. As part of the NACE Executive Board, I had a number of preconference commitments, and it was during the course of some of these interactions that I realized that this is the 15th anniversary of my very first NACE conference back in 2001 in Las Vegas! After absorbing that fact, I also realized that I was literally having cocktails with the three ladies who helped to make my first conference an experience that I remember vividly to this day.

David with Kathy and Vanessa.

David with Kathy and Vanessa.

I remember feeling very lost at the opening reception. It was a sea of people, almost none of whom I knew. I felt a little intimidated and a bit lonely (or at least as lonely as you can feel in a crowd of 2,000 plus people!). At that moment, someone tapped me on the my shoulder and said “You look like this might be your first time here…”. When I turned around, I was greeted by a woman with a huge smile who introduced herself as Vanessa Strauss (who would soon become the president of NACE). I responded that yes, this was indeed my first conference, and I didn’t have a clue what I was supposed to do next! She laughed, took my arm, and led me over to a group of people surrounding the front podium of the reception area, and she told me that she wanted to introduce me to Kathy Sims from UCLA, the (then) current NACE president. A long conversation ensued where I was welcomed as both a new conference attendee and a relatively new member of NACE. Both Vanessa and Kathy went out of their way to introduce me to several other members over the course of the week, which helped provide me with connections that I value to this day.

Flash forward another decade of so…..Kathy and Vanessa had been urging me for years to volunteer time with NACE, and truth be told, I fought off these overtures for years. They eventually wore me down though (they’re quite an effective tag team!), and I remember getting the call from Vanessa herself that I had been selected to serve on the Board of Directors. How fitting it was that one of the people that helped get me started on my NACE journey was delivering this happy news! And when the news became public, Kathy was one of the first to call with her congratulations, thus completing the circle.

David and Trudy

David and Trudy

Going back to Vegas…..My organization planned a fun university relations event for a small group of career center personnel at a nearby art exhibit. While I knew most of the attendees, this event afforded me some quality time with some particularly influential career center personnel. While there were several such individuals in attendance, I found myself drawn to the team from NYU, which was headed by Trudy Steinfeld. And while she and I talked for a couple of hours, it was amusing to me that we spoke very little about work! We talked baseball, living in NYC, our own college experiences, etc. When the event concluded, we didn’t just do the typical business card exchange; we actually made plans to meet up for happy hour a few weeks later in NYC.

From there, a wonderful friendship has bloomed. Trudy and I (and a large group of mutual friends) have shared cherished memories related to NACE activities, professional development opportunities, overseas trips, etc. When I am looking for professional advice, she is one of the first people I call for counsel, which says a lot.

Now that #NACE16 is ready for launch, I want to urge all of you newcomers out there (over 1,200 strong, at last count) to make the most of this first conference. Try doing these things: 1) Meet as many people as you can at the opening reception. Yes, it can feel pretty crazy, but remember that there a lot of people who have never done this before, so you’re not alone! 2) Attend the newcomer breakfast on Wednesday morning. You’ll get a chance to meet President-Elect Kathleen Powell and other NACE leaders who will be hosting the individual tables. They’ll answer your questions and talk about their experiences with our organization. 3) Don’t eat alone…..Don’t be afraid to sit at a lunch table filled with people you don’t know. Or to organize a group of people to grab dinner at one of Chicago’s many fine eateries.

David Ong

David Ong writing his latest blog while at #NACE16.

Now get out there and network! You’ll be glad you did….

#NACE16 Conference Time

Whether you’re new to NACE’s annual conference or this is your 10th time attending, here are things that will make this hectic and fun week easier.

naceappDownload the app and schedule your time. Set up your conference itinerary and use your smartphone or tablet to be your daily guide. The conference app offers information on all sessions, plus it links you to NACE’s social media so you can get updates and reminders for conference activities. You’ll find a map of the Hilton Chicago and the Expo Hall, and you’ll be able to message your colleagues through the app. To download this app, go to your device’s app store and search for NACE16. The app is free.

Need a little help using the app? Come to a free demonstration, 3 – 4 p.m. Tuesday, at NACE Connect in the Continental Ballroom.

Here’s the weather forecast. The average temperatures in Chicago in early June are typically in the mid- to upper-70s. AccuWeather.com says it will be mostly sunny the week of the conference.

comfortable shoesChoose your shoes for comfort. Business casual is the recommended dress for the event, but comfortable shoes are key. While regular conference events are on two floors of the Hilton Chicago, visiting the two exhibit halls and hitting the concurrent sessions means the potential for a lot of wear and tear on your feet. Wear your most comfortable shoes.luggage tag

Use your new NACE luggage tag. Spot your luggage (and that of other NACE16 attendees) at the luggage carousel quickly with NACE’s new luggage tag, sent to all NACE members in late spring.

Connect to colleagues (and more) in the NACE Connect area! When you’re not in a concurrent session or listening to a keynote, drop into the NACE Connect area to network with colleagues. You’ll find:

  • Recharging Lounge (sponsored by TMP Worldwide): Charge your phone or tablet while you rest your feet. Daily.
  • TECHbar (sponsored by Macy’s, Inc.): Learn how to use the latest apps and ask questions about how to make your technology work smarter for you! Daily.
  • Refueling Station: Snacks!
  • Welcome to Chicago Table (Tuesday only): Stop by and say hello to some of NACE’s Chicago locals and ask them what you shouldn’t miss while you’re in the Windy City.
  • NACE16 Mobile App Demo (3-4 p.m. Tuesday): Learn how to fully use the conference app.
  • Innovation Labs (Tuesday)
  • SMARTtalks (Wednesday)
  • Dinner sign ups (Wednesday)
  • Diversity & Inclusion Insight Labs (Thursday)

First time at the conference? Don’t miss the first-timers session sponsored by Raytheon Company, Wednesday morning in the Continental Ballroom. Spend an hour and eat breakfast while networking with other first timers. Get tips from attendees who have navigated the conference before on how to make the most of your conference experience.

plumshirtsIf the shirt is deep plum, it must be Tuesday. Questions? Need help? NACE staff is easily identifiable by the color of their shirts.

  • Wednesday: Red
  • Thursday: Teal
  • Friday: Green 

badgesIdentify attendees by their badges. Career services professionals wear blue badges; university relations and recruiters, red; business affiliates, purple; expo hall representatives, green, and NACE staff, black.

nace networkianPick up a ribbon for every badge. You’re not a speaker, an exhibitor, a board member, a first timer, or a blogger, but gosh darn, you’d like a ribbon to stick to your badge too.

coffee firstWell, this year, we have a ribbon for you! Twelve new fun ribbons—including NACE Networkian, NACE Nerd, Recruiting Superhero—plus ribbons to mark nace 60thyour 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, and 35th year as a NACE member.

Registration is open. Pick up your registration packet. Tuesday, June 7, registration is open from noon until 8:30 p.m.; and 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday. An information desk will be open from 7 a.m. to noon on Friday.

Get free Wi-Fi in the NACE space at the conference. Login: TMP Password: TalentBrew. (Not available in the Expo Hall or in your hotel room.)

dancing shoesPrepare for a formal evening and wear your dancing shoes. Thursday, attend the NACE 60th Gala Reception from 6 – 7 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom. Then, catch the bus to the Field Museum for the NACE 60th Gala Reception, dinner and dancing, 7 – 11 p.m. You must have a ticket to enter the reception.

Don’t leave your room without these things: Room key, electronic device with the NACE16 app and your schedule loaded, and conference badge (you can’t get into any sessions or events without it). Consider carrying a light sweater. Session rooms may be chilly.

Don’t forget to participate in social media. Tweet, Instagram, Facebook…share your conference experiences with fellow attendees and with those who couldn’t attend this year. See this great blog from Shannon Conklin and Kevin Gaw for details.

And, if you’re interested in joining the NACE blog team…ask for Claudia Allen at the registration desk!

Have a great conference and have a NACE Day! (Yes…we have that ribbon!)

have a nace day

Networking Made Easy for the NACE16 Crowd

Kathleen Powell

Kathleen Powell, Assistant Vice President, Student Affairs, Executive Director of Career Development, Cohen Career Center, William & Mary
President-Elect, National Association of Colleges and Employers
Twitter: @powellka
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kathleenipowell/

Did you know that 90 percent of all people are afraid to walk in to a room full of people they don’t know? It’s true and that’s why networking, mingling, and “working a room” can be daunting! And you might be thinking, “Don’t I have enough connections?” Well networking is about connections and opportunities. So, how does one make the most of opportunities that are presented? Know before you go wins the day every time! With the NACE conference next week, I’m sharing tips that have worked for me. I call them the Three P’s to networking! Preparation, Practice, and Presentation!

Preparation. Before any event, I look at the attendee list, if available, to see who will be attending and what connection I’d like to make. For example, the NACE conference, go to myNace>events> NACE 16 Conference and on the actions carrot, select attendee list. Knowing before you go is a great strategy! Think about your purpose. Another suggestion made by a wise colleague, “You never know when you’re doing business.” What was meant by that is you could strike up a conversation in an elevator and later find out that individual would become a business affiliate or colleague. Go with a plan! Do you want to meet five new people, two new people? It is for you to decide!

Practice. How will I start a conversation, stop a conversation, present a business card? Make an introduction? In the age of technology with text speak and most communication coming through computers and handheld devices, I often get the question, “What should I say?” I smile and recommend, “Hello, my name is (you fill in the blank). It’s nice to meet you.” The person standing in front of you will politely respond and then you start your conversation. The real question I’m being asked is, “What do I say next?” It has to be your own words, but it could be something like, “Have you been to an event like this before?” or “What are you looking forward to with this event?” If the person has participated in such an event before, “What should I expect from this event?” or “Any advice for me?” All of these opening lines are open-ended questions where the person you are engaging with shares more than a yes/no answer. From there you may land on common ground and the rest is history, as they say!

Presentation: You never get a second chance to make a first impression. I’ll repeat that, you never get a second chance to make a first impression! Think about it. How do you want to present yourself? It’s more than just your words! Perhaps this goes without saying, but I’m going to say it. Look the part! Being polished and dressed appropriately for the function you are attending will make you and those around you comfortable. Take your business cards and carry then in your pocket. I keep my cards in my right pocket and those I’ve collected in my left pocket. The last thing I want to do is dig through my handbag searching for my business card holder. I also keep a pen handy as well. After meeting with someone, I try to find a private space to write a note on the back of their card to remind myself if I need to follow up with any specific deliverable. Smile and make eye contact. It’s hard to make an introduction if you’re not looking at the person you’d like to meet! If the event provides name tags, wear them high on the right or if the lanyard tags are provided, make sure you “tie it up” so it hangs at the appropriate length!

Remember, if 90 percent of all people feel the same way about meeting new people, many of us are in this together! Be consider and appropriate, watch your time and be respectful, listen and remember to follow up. For those attending the NACE 16 Conference, I look forward to meeting you and for us to practice our networking skills together!

Explore Chicago While You’re at #NACE16

Shawn VanDerziel photoShawn VanDerziel, Chief Human Resources Officer at The Field Museum
Twitter: @ShawnVDZ
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/svanderziel

 

 

Make the most of your Chicago experience…

I am genuinely happy to welcome my NACE colleagues and friends to town for NACE’s 2016 Conference. I hope you are able to plan extra days before and/or after to explore this fine city. Whether you have just a few extra hours or a couple of days I thought I might offer a few suggestions for exploring the city.

Most of the suggestions are close to the conference hotel, which is in the South Loop neighborhood.

Exercise

Run… jog…walk through Grant Park (directly across from the hotel) or Millennium Park (home to the Cloud/Bean, and summer concerts) and along the Lakefront. The lakefront is not to be missed; it is our pride and joy. Better yet, you can easily rent a bike at Divvy, one of our shared bike stations.

Eat

It’s easy to get to some of Chicago’s best restaurants. Some are within walking distance, but there are many more just a quick/inexpensive taxi ride away in the following neighborhoods/areas: River North, along the Magnificent Mile, the Gold Coast and the not to be missed foodie paradise of the West Loop.

Grab a bite to eat at one of our celebrity-chef restaurants. We have the likes of Rick Bayless, Grant Achatz, Stefanie Izzard, Fabio Viviani, Graham Elliott Bowles, and Takakshi Yagihashi among others. Most will require advance reservations though. Or you might want to checkout a celebrity owned (or named) restaurant like Ditka’s, Michael Jordan’s Steakhouse, RPM Italian, RPM Steakhouse, or Harry Caray’s among many others.

Perhaps you  are in the mood for Chinese, then explore one of the restaurants in Chinatown or for Italian, visit our Little Italy.  Both are short cab rides away.

And there is always pizza. You’ve got to indulge in our world famous deep dish (or our cracker thin)! Within walking distance you’ll find: Lou Malnati’s, Pizano’s, Giordano’s, and Aurelio’s.

Shop

A quick taxi/Uber/Lyft ($6-7) or bus ride ($2.25) will get you to the Magnificent Mile (North Michigan Avenue) where you will find all of the top retailers.

Sports

Bummer… the Chicago Cubs are not in town the week of the conference. However, our other hometown team is. You might want to catch a Chicago White Sox game. They are playing all week and getting to the stadium is quick and easy by cab or even more quickly by the subway/El.

Music

We are known for it… checkout the blues and/or jazz scene. Within walking distance is one of Chicago’s most famous hangouts, Buddy Guy’s Legends. Further afield you will find: Blue Chicago, Green Mill, and B.L.U.E.S.

Theater and Comedy Shows

We have plenty of it. You can find last minute discounted tickets (up to a week in advance) at Hottix.org

Museums (of course!)

Walk (15 minutes) or take a quick cab ride to The Field Museum. That’s where I work. Admittedly, I am biased, but you can’t spend time in Chicago without seeing The Field. We’ve got: Sue, the largest, most complete T-Rex ever discovered; the Lions of Tsavo (from the movie Ghost and the Darkness); the amazing Terracotta Warriors; mummies in our Inside Ancient Egypt exhibition; dinosaurs; spectacular gems; and so much more.

You’ll indulge in social activity and the glamour of The Field Museum during Thursday night’s 60th Anniversary Gala (a must attend event!) , but you’ll want to take a special trip to explore properly.

And

Visit the Art Institute of Chicago, voted the number one Museum in the Country by TripAdvisor. You can walk there in about 10 minutes.

Whatever you do, HAVE FUN! There is something for everyone. I hope you are able to get out of the hotel to find out why Chicagoans love their city; especially in the summer!