Meet the 2016-17 NACE Board of Directors

Kathleen PowellKathleen I. Powell, NACE President; Associate Vice President for Career Development at William & Mary University

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE? When I started in the profession, many years ago, I was told you get out of an organization what you put in to it.  So, very early in my career, I pursued opportunities to serve on committees, chair and co-chair, eventually serving on the board at different times in my career.  It was a natural way to be of service to an organization that has a national voice in our profession.
What led you to your career path? This is a funny one. I went to college to be a nurse. Truth of the matter, I really don’t like being around sick people and organic chemistry, carbon bonds, and my interests were not a good fit.  I tried five majors and it was my time as a resident assistant that the director of residence life sat me down and told me about higher education careers. The rest is history!  (P.S.  For all the nurses and chemistry majors out there, thank you!)
What was your very first job?  My very first job was working at a convenience store in high school!  My best friend’s mom managed the store and it was quite the job. Then, during college, in the summers, I worked in an amusement park as a ride hostess—what a blast!  After college, I went to graduate school and landed my first job in career services and NEVER looked back!
Something personal: I enjoy basket weaving and biking. I biked across Iowa and Ohio and that was amazing.  I love to eat and cook and we have two dogs that I adore.  Cooper is a chocolate lab and Tucker is an English black lab.  I enjoy spending time with my husband and children, and life in general!

glen fowlerGlen Fowler, NACE President-Elect; Recruiting & Training Manager at California State Auditor

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE? I sought increased engagement with the NACE community because it inspires and recharges me!  Through NACE I am able to learn from my peers, and contribute to the profession.  I appreciate NACE’s emphasis on member resources, providing a forum to discuss industry challenges and opportunities, and leading initiatives like the 21st Century Career Services Model and Professional Standards for University Relations & Recruiting—but, and most importantly, I appreciate the opportunity NACE provides me to network and have fun with my peers.
What led you to your career path? My path to recruiting was not intentional.  After completing my master’s degree, I joined the California State Auditor’s office as a performance auditor.  I audited for a number of years, and then joined the executive team where I conducted legislative bill and audit analyses, among other responsibilities.  After several years, the Auditor General offered me the office’s recruiter role.  A year later he asked me to rejoin the executive team.  He sensed my reluctance, and recognized that I’d found a passion for recruiting.  I’d discovered how rewarding it was to find talented folks and support them in their success with our organization.
What was your very first job? My first job was at a golf course where I washed golf carts and picked up range balls.  Keep in mind that in those days, golfers would continue to hit range balls while I was out picking them up.  Occasionally I’d hear one fly past my head—really, I’m not kidding!  Thank goodness for today’s child protection laws.
Something personal: I’m the proud owner of two misbehaving dogs named Molly and Leo.  For instance, we often find our outdoor chair cushions strewn about the back lawn. Just when I’m going to discipline my furry friends for their naughty behavior, they pounce on me and lick me—and all the while their tales are wagging!  Molly’s and Leo’s “wonderful way” keeps everything in perspective for me.

dawn carterDawn Carter, NACE Past-President; Director, Early Careers at Intuit

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE? After pursing leadership avenues through the regional associations, I wanted to continue to expand my experience and volunteer leadership voice at a national level.  Through my time in various NACE leadership roles I have had the opportunity to work on and with such amazing people in the field.  Many times I was provided opportunities to learn new things by jumping into a team, taskforce, or committee that was a new topic for me.
What led you to your career path? As I started my career in talent acquisition, I loved the part of my job of that helped folks find their role in the company in a way that tied their passion.  I fell into university recruiting by chance and immediately fell in love. Where else do you have a chance to help students launch their careers.
What was your very first job? My first job out of university was into Marriott’s leadership program. As I transitioned my career from the hospitality industry into human resources, I started as a HR coordinator role and then worked my way up into different roles in university programs and recruiting.
Something personal: Love to travel!  Enjoy traveling to somewhere new and learning about food, art, and cultural differences.

chris carlsonChristopher Carlson, NACE Vice President-Employer; Director of Talent Acquisition and Diversity at Tennessee Valley Authority

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE? I pursued leadership with NACE for a number of reasons with the foremost being that NACE is about innovation and service.  The opportunity to help serve with other innovators toward a mission that is critical to our nation’s success is what drives me.
What led you to your career path? An inspiring mentor and manager led me into my career path. She was a wonderful woman who taught me the importance of human in human resources.
What was your very first job? My first job was working the Haunted River at Kings Dominion just outside of Richmond, Virginia.  I still know the announcements if you want to hear them.
Something personal: I am an urban hiker.  Drop me in a major city and I can wander for hours.

norma Guerra gaierNorma Guerra Gaier, NACE Vice President-College; Director, Career Services, Texas State University

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE? I was fortunate to have strong professional mentors who inspired and encouraged me to get involved early in my career. That’s all it took—once I served on a committee and met (via phone conferences) colleagues from across the country, I knew that I wanted to serve. Many of the colleagues I met over the years are now life-long friends who continue to inspire and challenge my thinking regarding our work. I am honored to serve our profession through my involvement with NACE, and my hope is that I can serve as a resource for others who seek to learn more about our work and get involved in the career services and university recruitment field.
What lead you to your career path? I have always had a passion for the art of communication, both verbal and written. As a college student, I spent countless hours in the career center creating and perfecting various cover letters and resumes for the different jobs that I interviewed for through the on-campus interviewing program. I found interviewing intriguing and spent much of my time studying the various types of interview styles and questions that I encountered. I got my first job through this process, but more importantly, just a year later, I got my start as a career services professional with the same career center I used as a student.
What was your very first job? As a recent college graduate, my first job was in retail. I was hired as the manager of a brand new sock shop called Something’s Afoot. I was able to help create store design, hire all staff, and create policies for operations and staffing.
Something personal: In my spare time, I enjoy exploring and traveling with my husband, Bill, and teenagers, Jacob and Abbie. We also love our four-legged family members, Roxy (pug), Bella (rat terrier/Chihuahua), and Kramer (Chihuahua).

o ray angleO. Ray Angle, NACE Director-College; Assistant Vice President for Career & Professional Development, Gonzaga University

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE? NACE has provided the profession with so much content and support over the years that I wanted the chance to give back by serving the NACE membership.
What led you to your career path? I worked in a college career center as an undergrad student and, by chance, discovered career services as a profession.
What was your very first job? I was a newspaper delivery boy starting when I was 11 years old.
Something personal: I’ve been in all 50 states, in 17 countries, and on five continents.

susan brennanSusan Brennan, NACE Director-College; Associate Vice President, University Career Services at Bentley University

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE? I am a passionate career services leader and advocate and excited to share my ideas and energy with wonderful NACE colleagues. I am proud of the groundbreaking work happening in our profession and ready to broaden my perspective, to learn and grow personally and professionally, and to have fun and build new friendships in the process.
What led you to your career path? After graduate school, I worked as a human resources strategy consultant and found myself consistently gravitating toward higher education assignments and clients. Through many soul searching conversations with my personal career advisory board and mentors, I learned about an opportunity to transition to career services and have never looked back!
What was your very first job? After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania, I wanted to find a way to combine my passions for education and service with my strengths in marketing and relationship building. Working with the Board of Trustees as a development assistant at the Boston Children’s Museum allowed me to learn the fundamentals of nonprofit management while feeling like I was making a difference in the lives of children and families.
Something personal: I have been married for 23 wonderful years to Mike, who is a lawyer by day and a chef by hobby, requiring me to wake up at 5 a.m. each morning to try to work off the previous evening’s delicious calories! The importance of our work hits home every day, as our son, Jake, just completed sophomore year at Tulane and is interning on Capitol Hill while our son, Dan, is wrapping up junior year of high school and is now embarking on his college search journey.

Christine CruzvergaraChristine Cruzvergara, NACE Director-College; Associate Provost and Executive Director for Career Education, Wellesley College

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE? NACE is an organization that has given me a lot in my career. Over the years, I’ve made deep friendships, benchmarked with exceptional colleagues, and grown as a professional. It’s my desire to give back to my colleagues and to serve my profession.
What led you to your career path? I originally thought I’d be a family and marriage counselor but feared that I would get burnt out listening to people’s marital problems for 40 hours a week! My advisers in college encouraged me to think about a career in higher education as a way to use my helping skills in a different context. Along the way, great colleagues and mentors pushed me to realize my potential in ways I couldn’t have imagined.
What was your very first job? My first job was running new student orientation at George Washington University. My first part-time job (at 15) was a waitress in a retirement home.
Something personal: I love travel, tv, skiing, and eating, in no particular order! I especially love doing those things with my husband, Alex and my playful 3-year-old, Andreas.

caroline cunninghamCaroline Cunningham, NACE Director-Employer; Director, University Relations & Diversity Programs, GE Digital

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE? I have learned so much and made so many wonderful friends throughout my nine years of involvement with NACE that I really wanted to give back.  The future of URR and career services is so dynamic and exciting and I want to be a part of shaping NACE’s strategy to support that.
What led you to your career path? I fell into recruiting. I started out in HR thinking I wanted to be in employee relations and had a former boss suggest that I would be good at recruiting. After a few years on the experienced side, I had an opportunity to assist with university recruiting and found my true passion. I have never looked back.
What was your very first job? Outside of babysitting and doing odd jobs around the neighborhood, I worked as a summer day camp counselor at our local community center.  I had a group of 3- and 4-year-olds for three hours a day and had to keep them entertained with fun and enriching activities.  It was a ton of fun and definitely lead me to a life-long path of being linked to education and supporting future generations in their development.
Something personal: I never played team sports when I was growing up but have two daughters who play competitive soccer. Most of my spare time is spent shuttling them to practice, attending games and tournaments, and volunteering for their teams.  Through my daughter’s experiences I have seen them grow in so many areas— leadership, teamwork, integrity, and perseverance to name a few. Supporting their commitment is truly one of the most rewarding parts of my life as a parent. When I do have a few minutes to myself, you will most likely find me catching the latest and greatest Broadway show, attending a concert, or simply watching The Voice!

 carlena harrisCarlena Harris, NACE Director-Employer; Human Resources Manager, Recruiting Operations, National Instruments

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE?  I’m passionate about sharing what I have learned and experienced to assist individuals, teams, and organizations in reaching their goals.  National Instruments has been a member of NACE for many years and I thought it would be great to serve on behalf of my employer.
What led you to your career path? I was promoted to a software development manager position mid-way in my career, which allowed me to recruit team members for the organization via conferences and university career fairs.  I enjoyed that part of my job, so I decided to prepare for a full–time talent recruiting opportunity.  I joined National Instruments in 2014 as a human resources manager within the University Recruiting Operations team.
What was your very first job? I worked at AstroWorld in Houston, Texas in the games operation department. That job helped me develop my customer service skills.
Something personal:  I’m an active mom of two teenagers, a cyclist, a huge Prince fan, and I love to cook.

Janet LasaterJennifer Lasater, NACE Director-College; Vice President, Employer and Career Services, Kaplan University

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE?  I wanted to give back to my profession. I started getting involved by volunteering on committees for NACE and really enjoyed the work and time with others, that led to me exploring additional roles with NACE.
What led you to your career path? I was a resident assistant in college and loved working in student affairs, but I wanted to try a few years in the “real world” after graduating with my B.A. I got involved with recruiting for a staffing company and one of our recruiting sites was a small art/design school. I found that career services was the perfect fit for me because it combined my passion for students along with the motivation of hitting goals in recruiting.
What was your very first job? When I was 14, I worked at a Dairy Queen for a few weeks—not that exciting or glamorous. That was clearly not my career path.
Something personal: My family and I love going on Disney cruises—we’ve been on quite a few now. Our favorites so far have been the Mediterranean and Alaska.

Margaret paulinMargaret Paulin, NACE Director-Employer; Manager, Sector University Relations & Recruiting, Northrop Grumman

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE? I have had the good fortune to serve on several NACE committees and decided to further serve NACE members by contributing as a board member.
What led you to your career path? My first position in university relations and recruiting started as a six-month rotational assignment. Well beyond those six months now, I moved forward in the profession and never looked back.
What was your very first job?  
I worked at USA cheerleading camps the summer after graduating from college and managed a red brick residence hall at San Jose State University.
Something personal: I have two senior furry children, Sadie and Buddy, which rule our house. Sadie is a chocolate lab that we raised as a puppy and Buddy is an American Bulldog, pit mix—he is a rescue shelter dog. The two complement and keep each other occupied during the day.

pam websterPam Webster, NACE Director-Employer; Assistant Vice President, Talent Acquisition, Enterprise Holdings

What led you to pursue leadership with NACE?  As a leader in Talent Acquisition for Enterprise, I believe it’s important to give back to the profession in a volunteer capacity.  Not only does it help strengthen our brand within the college/university community, but it gives me the opportunity to network and learn from thought leaders in the space.  I have gained lifelong friends along the way which is a bonus!
What led you to your career path?  Getting into recruiting was a little bit of luck and a leap of faith. Enterprise promotes from within and when we started expanding significantly in the late 80s, new positions were created in our field operations. I was a branch manager at the time and had been with the company about four years and my manager (our current CEO, Pam Nicholson) came to me to ask if I would be interested in filling one of the new spots. I have been with Enterprise for 31 years and in some form of talent acquisition for 27 of those years, being one of the pioneers in campus recruiting for Enterprise.
What was your very first job?  My first job was in high school, working at a plant nursery. I was responsible for watering, fertilizing, and transplanting plants as they grew to get them ready for retail sales. Unfortunately my experience did not pay off as I do not have a green thumb and can’t keep most plants alive.
Something personal: I am an avid animal lover and in the past two years after losing two cats who were 17 and 19, I adopted a pit bull mix, Tilly, who was a street dog and in foster care for a year. Last summer, I took in a stray cat I named Coco and her litter of five kittens, that were about three weeks old. When the kittens were 12 weeks old, two of my work colleagues each took one of the kittens, another friend took one, my mom took Coco, and we kept two of the kittens, Jaxon and Princess, and added to our household of now three cats and a dog. I have also spent time volunteering for the Humane Society of Missouri and served on the board for a local horse rescue.

Read the full biographies of NACE’s 2016-17 Board of Directors on NACEWeb.

Practice Interviews and Anxiety

Kara BrownKara Brown, Associate Director of Career Development, Gwynedd Mercy University
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brownkara
Twitter: https://twitter.com/gmercyucareers

A key issue that I have noticed with the majority of practice interviews that I conduct with students is anxiety. Often during a practice interview I observe symptoms of anxiety including: pressured speech, agitation of hands and feet, sweating, increased heartrate, nervous laughter, and sometimes crying. I am quickly able to identify these symptoms because in addition to my career counseling background, I also am trained in clinical mental health counseling.

While interview anxiety can be uncomfortable and difficult to address with students, I have found it to be extremely important to discuss. In some cases, anxiety can be linked to fear, lack of self-confidence, and/or lack of experience. It is important to address these issues head on before the student goes into an interview.

What can career counselors/advisers do to help?

Address it. Whenever we are in an uncomfortable situation we tend to want to ignore it. However, ignoring the anxiety that a student is experiencing in regard to interviewing could potentially continue to worsen the anxiety. Therefore, address the issue with, “I notice that you seem anxious. Tell me about that.”

Actively listen. Listen to what the student is telling you. For example, I had a student explain that they did not feel qualified for the position that they were applying to. So I went through each job requirement, and asked the student to give an example of how they met that requirement. The student felt more confident because they were able to verbally reason why they were qualified for the position.

Encourage practice. For some students, continuing to practice for an interview can help boost their confidence and decrease their anxiety.

Provide anxiety reducing techniques. There are several techniques that anyone can use to reduce anxiety. This may require a bit of research to find which one would work best for your students. While working with students with interview anxiety, I typically recommend that they use the technique of “being present.” I explain to them that while they are sitting in the lobby prior to going in for an interview, they take a few slow deep breaths, and notice what is going on around them. For example, what does the room look like? What do you smell? What are you feeling? I find that this process helps to lower a student’s anxiety by refocusing their attention on to something else.

Refer. There may be situations in which a student’s anxiety is so severe that they may require counseling services. It is important to have a referral process in place with your university’s counseling service in case these kinds of situations were to occur.
After you have conducted a practice interview with a student, make sure that you follow up with that student to find out how the interview went for them. Ask these students, “What went well? What did not go well? Did anything surprise you?” This kind of follow up allows the student to self-evaluate, and also helps to maintain their connection with your career development center.

Liberal Arts and STEM: Happily Ever After?

 

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Pamela Weinberg
Website: www.pamelaweinberg.com
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/pamelaweinberg/
Twitter: @pamelaweinberg
Blogs from Pamela Weinberg.

A recent New York Times headline stopped me cold. It was entitled: “A Rising Call to Foster STEM Fields, and Decrease Liberal Arts Funding.” The article spoke of a handful of state governors who were suggesting that students majoring in liberal arts would not receive state funding for their education and that only those students “educated in fields seen as important to the economy” would benefit from funding.

As a liberal arts major and a career coach who believes in the value of a liberal arts education, this was stunning. Of course teaching students “hard” skills is important. Nobody would argue that teaching undergraduate students how to code is a bad idea. However, there is much evidence that hard skills alone don’t make for a successful employee. According to a recent Wall Street Journal article, a study conducted by USC’s Annenberg School of Communications and Journalism found that “Future leaders must be strong in quantitative, technical, and business skills. But to advance in their careers, they also need to be good strategic thinkers and must have strong social and communications skills.”

The WSJ article made the case for the importance of continuing to offer a liberal arts curriculum to students. The author makes the critical point that liberal arts and STEM needn’t be an “either/or” proposition. A Forbes.com blog speaks of the many smaller college and universities, such as Rochester Institute of Technology, which have created cross-disciplinary or integrated curriculums, that require STEM students to complete a general education program. At the same time, liberal arts schools like Lafayette University are beginning to reform their curriculums to keep them more relevant.

Critics of liberal arts education will make the case that majoring in a liberal arts field doesn’t guarantee a job with high earnings. This is true. No major can guarantee that. However, some of our country’s most successful and well-paid CEOs majored in liberal arts disciplines: Mark Parker, President and CEO of Nike (political science), Howard Schultz, Chairman and CEO of Starbucks (communications) and Bob Iger, Chairman and CEO of The Walt Disney Company (television and radio)

One of the tenets of a liberal arts education is practicing critical thinking. According to the WSJ article “Technical and business skills can get graduates in the door, but an ability to think critically and communicate effectively can play an equal, if not larger role in determining success.” It would seem then, that students of all majors would benefit from a mix of courses that are STEM based and liberal arts based.
I would love to hear your opinions on this—please let me know how you are advising your liberal arts majors in their career searches.

NACE16: Finished, But Not Forgotten!

Kathleen Powell

Kathleen Powell, Assistant Vice President, Student Affairs, Executive Director of Career Development, Cohen Career Center, William & Mary
President-Elect, National Association of Colleges and Employers
Twitter: @powellka
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kathleenipowell/

NACE16 is over, but you’re just getting started! Remember to rekindle your connections, unpack the sessions you attended and share those with your team, and decide what’s next for you as you engage with your professional association. Whether you were a first-timer to the NACE conference or a seasoned expo goer, I think you will agree that the four days in Chicago were robust, thought-provoking, and quite the return on investment. The keynote speakers hit it out of the park. The content of their information aligned well with the work we all do around career readiness, STEAM, generational issues, and life profit! I think we could all use a bit more life profit.

Whether you collected business cards or connected through MLI alumni meet ups, LAP events, or hospitality opportunities, or grabbed lunch or dinner with old or new colleagues, staying connected will keep the information and conversations shared fresh and top of mind. You might remember President Dawn Carter challenging us to meet 50 new people while at the conference? I would echo her challenge and ask you to consider continuing the charge and connecting with members of our association. Did one of the sessions you couldn’t attend spark your interest, but you couldn’t be two places at once? Not a problem, visit NACEWeb and click on the MyNACE tab. Choose “purchase history” and click on the “Actions” arrow next to the conference. You will get a drop-down menu of options, including “View Handouts.” Find the handout for that session you missed. If you have more questions, contact the presenter/presenters. Our association members are excited about their work and willing to share best practices!

Kathleen Powell sparkles at the closing of the conference.

Kathleen Powell sparkles at the closing of the conference.

NACE16 rolled out the First-Destination Survey Results for the Class of 2015 and it was robust! The Advocacy Committee presented the most up-to-date information on FLSA and OPT changes, and discussed the NACE Position Statement on Diversity and Anti-Discrimination. The Career Readiness Tiger Team shared updates on the Career Readiness Toolkits and there was lively discussion around how institutions and employers are aligning and mapping the seven core competencies around career readiness within their work.

The conference provided Techbyte opportunities, SMARTalks, Innovation Labs, and an Innovation Challenge! Members of our organization were recognized for their dedication to the profession and their outstanding work that moves the needle for our association.

There is no doubt NACE16 was a success. That success is shared as there is so much happening behind the scenes that makes the expo hum. It’s our members, who share their time and talent with all of us, that keeps us nimble, informed, and prepared for what’s next to come in our professional work.

Kathleen Powell sparkles at the closing of the conference.

Kathleen Powell, NACE President 2016-17, speaks to the audience at the NACE16 closing session.

So, you might be thinking, “This is all wonderful, but I didn’t attend the conference.” Don’t fret my pets—(one of my grandmother’s favorite expressions)—you can find the Advocacy issues on naceweb.org! Looking for career readiness information, naceweb.org, looking for first-destination information, naceweb.org. Curious about all our association has to offer….naceweb.org!

 

Yes, the conference has come and gone, but the opportunity to engage with other members is just a website away. Don’t miss the opportunity for outreach to your colleagues, learn first hand what is top of mind for the profession, and don’t think the conference is one and done! I encourage you to find those 50 new people and take advantage of Face2Face, roundtables, training opportunities, and webinars! The possibilities truly are ENDLESS!

Building Memories

ongDavid Ong, Director, Corporate Recruiting, Maximus, Inc.
Twitter: @dtong2565
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/dave-ong/0/604/513

 

Now that #NACE16 is upon us, I found myself reminiscing last night. As part of the NACE Executive Board, I had a number of preconference commitments, and it was during the course of some of these interactions that I realized that this is the 15th anniversary of my very first NACE conference back in 2001 in Las Vegas! After absorbing that fact, I also realized that I was literally having cocktails with the three ladies who helped to make my first conference an experience that I remember vividly to this day.

David with Kathy and Vanessa.

David with Kathy and Vanessa.

I remember feeling very lost at the opening reception. It was a sea of people, almost none of whom I knew. I felt a little intimidated and a bit lonely (or at least as lonely as you can feel in a crowd of 2,000 plus people!). At that moment, someone tapped me on the my shoulder and said “You look like this might be your first time here…”. When I turned around, I was greeted by a woman with a huge smile who introduced herself as Vanessa Strauss (who would soon become the president of NACE). I responded that yes, this was indeed my first conference, and I didn’t have a clue what I was supposed to do next! She laughed, took my arm, and led me over to a group of people surrounding the front podium of the reception area, and she told me that she wanted to introduce me to Kathy Sims from UCLA, the (then) current NACE president. A long conversation ensued where I was welcomed as both a new conference attendee and a relatively new member of NACE. Both Vanessa and Kathy went out of their way to introduce me to several other members over the course of the week, which helped provide me with connections that I value to this day.

Flash forward another decade of so…..Kathy and Vanessa had been urging me for years to volunteer time with NACE, and truth be told, I fought off these overtures for years. They eventually wore me down though (they’re quite an effective tag team!), and I remember getting the call from Vanessa herself that I had been selected to serve on the Board of Directors. How fitting it was that one of the people that helped get me started on my NACE journey was delivering this happy news! And when the news became public, Kathy was one of the first to call with her congratulations, thus completing the circle.

David and Trudy

David and Trudy

Going back to Vegas…..My organization planned a fun university relations event for a small group of career center personnel at a nearby art exhibit. While I knew most of the attendees, this event afforded me some quality time with some particularly influential career center personnel. While there were several such individuals in attendance, I found myself drawn to the team from NYU, which was headed by Trudy Steinfeld. And while she and I talked for a couple of hours, it was amusing to me that we spoke very little about work! We talked baseball, living in NYC, our own college experiences, etc. When the event concluded, we didn’t just do the typical business card exchange; we actually made plans to meet up for happy hour a few weeks later in NYC.

From there, a wonderful friendship has bloomed. Trudy and I (and a large group of mutual friends) have shared cherished memories related to NACE activities, professional development opportunities, overseas trips, etc. When I am looking for professional advice, she is one of the first people I call for counsel, which says a lot.

Now that #NACE16 is ready for launch, I want to urge all of you newcomers out there (over 1,200 strong, at last count) to make the most of this first conference. Try doing these things: 1) Meet as many people as you can at the opening reception. Yes, it can feel pretty crazy, but remember that there a lot of people who have never done this before, so you’re not alone! 2) Attend the newcomer breakfast on Wednesday morning. You’ll get a chance to meet President-Elect Kathleen Powell and other NACE leaders who will be hosting the individual tables. They’ll answer your questions and talk about their experiences with our organization. 3) Don’t eat alone…..Don’t be afraid to sit at a lunch table filled with people you don’t know. Or to organize a group of people to grab dinner at one of Chicago’s many fine eateries.

David Ong

David Ong writing his latest blog while at #NACE16.

Now get out there and network! You’ll be glad you did….

#NACE16 Conference Time

Whether you’re new to NACE’s annual conference or this is your 10th time attending, here are things that will make this hectic and fun week easier.

naceappDownload the app and schedule your time. Set up your conference itinerary and use your smartphone or tablet to be your daily guide. The conference app offers information on all sessions, plus it links you to NACE’s social media so you can get updates and reminders for conference activities. You’ll find a map of the Hilton Chicago and the Expo Hall, and you’ll be able to message your colleagues through the app. To download this app, go to your device’s app store and search for NACE16. The app is free.

Need a little help using the app? Come to a free demonstration, 3 – 4 p.m. Tuesday, at NACE Connect in the Continental Ballroom.

Here’s the weather forecast. The average temperatures in Chicago in early June are typically in the mid- to upper-70s. AccuWeather.com says it will be mostly sunny the week of the conference.

comfortable shoesChoose your shoes for comfort. Business casual is the recommended dress for the event, but comfortable shoes are key. While regular conference events are on two floors of the Hilton Chicago, visiting the two exhibit halls and hitting the concurrent sessions means the potential for a lot of wear and tear on your feet. Wear your most comfortable shoes.luggage tag

Use your new NACE luggage tag. Spot your luggage (and that of other NACE16 attendees) at the luggage carousel quickly with NACE’s new luggage tag, sent to all NACE members in late spring.

Connect to colleagues (and more) in the NACE Connect area! When you’re not in a concurrent session or listening to a keynote, drop into the NACE Connect area to network with colleagues. You’ll find:

  • Recharging Lounge (sponsored by TMP Worldwide): Charge your phone or tablet while you rest your feet. Daily.
  • TECHbar (sponsored by Macy’s, Inc.): Learn how to use the latest apps and ask questions about how to make your technology work smarter for you! Daily.
  • Refueling Station: Snacks!
  • Welcome to Chicago Table (Tuesday only): Stop by and say hello to some of NACE’s Chicago locals and ask them what you shouldn’t miss while you’re in the Windy City.
  • NACE16 Mobile App Demo (3-4 p.m. Tuesday): Learn how to fully use the conference app.
  • Innovation Labs (Tuesday)
  • SMARTtalks (Wednesday)
  • Dinner sign ups (Wednesday)
  • Diversity & Inclusion Insight Labs (Thursday)

First time at the conference? Don’t miss the first-timers session sponsored by Raytheon Company, Wednesday morning in the Continental Ballroom. Spend an hour and eat breakfast while networking with other first timers. Get tips from attendees who have navigated the conference before on how to make the most of your conference experience.

plumshirtsIf the shirt is deep plum, it must be Tuesday. Questions? Need help? NACE staff is easily identifiable by the color of their shirts.

  • Wednesday: Red
  • Thursday: Teal
  • Friday: Green 

badgesIdentify attendees by their badges. Career services professionals wear blue badges; university relations and recruiters, red; business affiliates, purple; expo hall representatives, green, and NACE staff, black.

nace networkianPick up a ribbon for every badge. You’re not a speaker, an exhibitor, a board member, a first timer, or a blogger, but gosh darn, you’d like a ribbon to stick to your badge too.

coffee firstWell, this year, we have a ribbon for you! Twelve new fun ribbons—including NACE Networkian, NACE Nerd, Recruiting Superhero—plus ribbons to mark nace 60thyour 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, and 35th year as a NACE member.

Registration is open. Pick up your registration packet. Tuesday, June 7, registration is open from noon until 8:30 p.m.; and 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday. An information desk will be open from 7 a.m. to noon on Friday.

Get free Wi-Fi in the NACE space at the conference. Login: TMP Password: TalentBrew. (Not available in the Expo Hall or in your hotel room.)

dancing shoesPrepare for a formal evening and wear your dancing shoes. Thursday, attend the NACE 60th Gala Reception from 6 – 7 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom. Then, catch the bus to the Field Museum for the NACE 60th Gala Reception, dinner and dancing, 7 – 11 p.m. You must have a ticket to enter the reception.

Don’t leave your room without these things: Room key, electronic device with the NACE16 app and your schedule loaded, and conference badge (you can’t get into any sessions or events without it). Consider carrying a light sweater. Session rooms may be chilly.

Don’t forget to participate in social media. Tweet, Instagram, Facebook…share your conference experiences with fellow attendees and with those who couldn’t attend this year. See this great blog from Shannon Conklin and Kevin Gaw for details.

And, if you’re interested in joining the NACE blog team…ask for Claudia Allen at the registration desk!

Have a great conference and have a NACE Day! (Yes…we have that ribbon!)

have a nace day

Networking Made Easy for the NACE16 Crowd

Kathleen Powell

Kathleen Powell, Assistant Vice President, Student Affairs, Executive Director of Career Development, Cohen Career Center, William & Mary
President-Elect, National Association of Colleges and Employers
Twitter: @powellka
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kathleenipowell/

Did you know that 90 percent of all people are afraid to walk in to a room full of people they don’t know? It’s true and that’s why networking, mingling, and “working a room” can be daunting! And you might be thinking, “Don’t I have enough connections?” Well networking is about connections and opportunities. So, how does one make the most of opportunities that are presented? Know before you go wins the day every time! With the NACE conference next week, I’m sharing tips that have worked for me. I call them the Three P’s to networking! Preparation, Practice, and Presentation!

Preparation. Before any event, I look at the attendee list, if available, to see who will be attending and what connection I’d like to make. For example, the NACE conference, go to myNace>events> NACE 16 Conference and on the actions carrot, select attendee list. Knowing before you go is a great strategy! Think about your purpose. Another suggestion made by a wise colleague, “You never know when you’re doing business.” What was meant by that is you could strike up a conversation in an elevator and later find out that individual would become a business affiliate or colleague. Go with a plan! Do you want to meet five new people, two new people? It is for you to decide!

Practice. How will I start a conversation, stop a conversation, present a business card? Make an introduction? In the age of technology with text speak and most communication coming through computers and handheld devices, I often get the question, “What should I say?” I smile and recommend, “Hello, my name is (you fill in the blank). It’s nice to meet you.” The person standing in front of you will politely respond and then you start your conversation. The real question I’m being asked is, “What do I say next?” It has to be your own words, but it could be something like, “Have you been to an event like this before?” or “What are you looking forward to with this event?” If the person has participated in such an event before, “What should I expect from this event?” or “Any advice for me?” All of these opening lines are open-ended questions where the person you are engaging with shares more than a yes/no answer. From there you may land on common ground and the rest is history, as they say!

Presentation: You never get a second chance to make a first impression. I’ll repeat that, you never get a second chance to make a first impression! Think about it. How do you want to present yourself? It’s more than just your words! Perhaps this goes without saying, but I’m going to say it. Look the part! Being polished and dressed appropriately for the function you are attending will make you and those around you comfortable. Take your business cards and carry then in your pocket. I keep my cards in my right pocket and those I’ve collected in my left pocket. The last thing I want to do is dig through my handbag searching for my business card holder. I also keep a pen handy as well. After meeting with someone, I try to find a private space to write a note on the back of their card to remind myself if I need to follow up with any specific deliverable. Smile and make eye contact. It’s hard to make an introduction if you’re not looking at the person you’d like to meet! If the event provides name tags, wear them high on the right or if the lanyard tags are provided, make sure you “tie it up” so it hangs at the appropriate length!

Remember, if 90 percent of all people feel the same way about meeting new people, many of us are in this together! Be consider and appropriate, watch your time and be respectful, listen and remember to follow up. For those attending the NACE 16 Conference, I look forward to meeting you and for us to practice our networking skills together!