Why Recruiters Ignore Students’ LinkedIn Invitations

Andres TraslavinaAndres Traslavina, Director of Global Recruiting, Whole Foods Market
Twitter: @traslavina
LinkedIn: http:www.linkedin.com/in/traslavina

I receive a number of daily invitations from people I don’t know, including students, who want to connect on LinkedIn.

My first reaction when I see such invitations is to ignore and delete. However, I changed my views on this a while ago based on my understanding of the fundamental differences in people’s relationship talent and circumstances.

Personalizing an invitation is one common “tip” or advice provided by recruiting and networking professionals.  So why do people keep sending me impersonal invites?

Here are my theories:

  • They have not received or read anything that implies this is bad practice. In addition, LinkedIn makes it easy to ignore what would, under other circumstances, be a bad practice. LinkedIn’s objective is to continue to grow their user base.
  • They simply want to quickly grow their network and want to spend the least amount of time doing it.
  • Success for the sender depends on building as many connections as possible.
  • People’s circumstances and perspectives are very different: Active candidates, networkers, passive candidates, happy employees, sales professionals, etc.

Naturally, I am compelled to connect with those who have interests in common with me. In recruiting, this natural ability helps me discover commonalities between me, or the brand I represent and the potential job candidate.

All recruiters know how to research candidates, and often use their available social channels to accomplish this. If you truly enjoy this process, you are a natural recruiter. If you enjoy the process of “hunting” for people without necessarily feel eager to connect and you are great at it, you are a natural sourcer.

These are two different sets of talent. Can you have both? Absolutely.

My point is that for individuals like me, a non-personal invitation will not likely “push” the right button. In summary, my advice coincides with most recruiting professionals: “Personalize your invitation, it takes one minute.”

However, the next time you receive an “I’d like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn,” think about their circumstances and the differences in our natural abilities to connect with others.

Follow Andres on Twitter @traslavina or connect with him on LinkedIn (just make sure it’s personalized).

 

NACE Flash Poll – Internships

kevin grubbA post by NACE Ambassador Kevin Grubb
Assistant Director at Villanova University’s Career Center.
Twitter: @kevincgrubb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevingrubb
Blog: “social @ edu”.

An issue that’s making national headlines this year is that of internships. In fact, it hit the news recently again: Conde Nast announced that they are discontinuing their internship program for 2014 after two former interns filed a lawsuit over issues of pay.

So, I’m curious: NACE blog readers, what do you think about internships? Vote in the flash poll below and share your thoughts in the comments! (Note: flash poll votes are anonymous)

For more on internships, read NACE’s Position Statements on US Internships and 15 Best Practices for Internship Programs.

NACE Membership: Making It Personal

Dan BlackDan Black, Americas Director of Recruiting, EY LLP
2013-14 NACE President

LinkedIn: Dan Black
Twitter: @DanBlack_EY
Ernst & Young LLP

Among the items I always carry with me are my car keys, my phone, and a reminder that, every day, I need to personally connect with at least one NACE member. Why? Because I believe in the power of networking and, when a personal relationship develops, it reinforces the strength of the profession.

Empowering members to make personal connections—to people, resources, and professional development opportunities—is central to NACE’s new membership model, which was designed by a task force of NACE members to break down the layered complexity of previous structures and provide expanded benefits to all members. I was proud to be a member of the task force and very excited to see the new model being rolled out.

What does this mean for you? The first key benefit is inclusivity. Under the new model, you can bring more people from your organization into the fold and help them develop their own professional expertise. It promotes the learning, networking, and engagement of staff at all levels of your organization.

The second key benefit of this model is access. You and your staff will have expanded access to “non-benefit” resources. For example, I participate in all of the surveys NACE generates for employers. Under the new membership model and because I am a survey participant, all the members in my organization will now have access to these surveys’ research reports. Being able to operate from the same foundation of information and resources is important to my organization since we strive to attract, engage, and hire top-level candidates as “one team.”

It doesn’t matter if you’re part of a large corporation with a global recruiting presence or you’re a one-person career services office at a small college—you will benefit from NACE’s new membership model. It will give you greater access to the information you need, the development opportunities you want to take advantage of, and the personal connections you want to make.

Make the change today! You don’t have to wait until your scheduled renewal to take advantage of the new structure. Bring membership benefits to more people in your operation right away by contacting the NACE Membership Team at customerservice@naceweb.org or 610.868.1421.

Strategies to Help Students Get the Most from Their LinkedIn Experience

Espie SantiagoEspie Santiago, NACE Guest Blogger, is an assistant director of career counseling at the Stanford University Career Development Center
Twitter: @espie_s
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/espiesantiagoOn Friday, August 23, my colleague Bev Principal and I will be conducting a session on “Strategies to Help Students Get the Most from Their LinkedIn Experience.” As career services professionals and employers, we all know that LinkedIn is a mandatory tool in today’s job market, but it can be challenging to convince students of its value without structured programs. It’s even more challenging when faculty and academic departments on your college campus don’t use LinkedIn themselves, and therefore don’t support or encourage students to use it. We’re excited to share with you how we, at the Stanford University Career Development Center, were able to successfully grow our LinkedIn program amongst students, faculty and staff, thereby helping students get the most from their LinkedIn experience. Ours is one such success story, but we’re also anxious to hear anecdotes from others on the do’s and don’ts of building social media programs at your respective organizations.

I am really looking forward to meeting fellow social media enthusiasts throughout #NACESocial!

Debrief of #NACE13: Day 1

Sarah MartinA post by Guest Blogger, Sarah Martin, College Relations and Social Media Recruiter, Garmin International
Twitter: @workatgarmin
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/SarahMartin1I had the privilege to attend 3 workshops on Day 1: Setting Standards for the Candidate Experience, Professional Standards for University Relations and Recruiting, and Effectively Utilizing Mobile Technologies. Conferences tend to be information overload, so I’d like to share my quick take-a-ways from each workshop.

Setting Standards for the Candidate Experience:
• Build your own business case with numbers and dollars
• Audit yourself
• It’s critical to seek feedback from your candidates (and not just those you end up hiring)
• Match your medium to your audience
• Be truthful when answering candidate questions
• Deliver what you promise
*Presenter: Gerry Crispin, CareerXroads

Professional Standards for University Relations and Recruiting:
How many of you knew there were URR standards published in 1976? Did you realize those standards were recently updated for the first time?! Thank you #NACE13! The updated standards are currently available through the NACE13 app and will be on the NACE web site within the next couple of weeks. I’m impressed that 40+ individuals came together to “get it right.” This document is sure to help employers across the country assess the current state of their College Recruitment programs, as well as, provide guidance for a lasting, successful future. I’m eager to take a closer look at the details!
*Presenter: Jeff Goodman

Effectively Utilizing Mobile Technologies:
Not surprising: Nearly half of all 18-29 year-olds who access the Internet on their phones, do the majority of their online browsing on their mobile device. Surprising: Many companies utilize text messaging as a successful medium for recruitment. We have a list of avenues in which we intend to reach out to our candidates, but text messaging hasn’t even been on our radar. The numbers don’t lie, though. The case studies presented in this workshop provided insight to several successful campaigns. The biggest take-a-way for me: mobile is where the action is! If you don’t have your hat in the ring, you are missing out on quality candidates. When communicating with candidates through mobile technologies, it’s essential that you are concise, relevant, and professional. We are all aware that we have a very short period of time to make an impression on our candidates… and mobile technology shortens that timeframe even further. Now, time to strategize and get a plan in place.
*Presenters: Lindsay Stanton, Job Search Television Network and Jay Floersch, PeopleScout Inc.

Overall… a very impressive Day 1!

#NACE13: Let the Countdown Begin

Sarah MartinA post by Guest Blogger, Sarah Martin, College Relations and Social Media Recruiter, Garmin International

Twitter: @workatgarmin

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/SarahMartin1

#NACE13. My first NACE conference! I’ve been looking forward to this event for months and am so honored to participate as a guest blogger. My background? I’ve been recruiting for 9 years, the last 3 of which have been exclusively college recruitment at Garmin International. A year ago we started incorporating social media into our company recruitment efforts, which has been an extremely interesting and educational adventure. I’m so thankful to have a mentor who has paved the way for social media within Garmin! Our current recruitment efforts, with regards to social media, are primarily focused on Twitter (@workatgarmin). There are so many avenues to reach potential candidates, we are continually evaluating the most strategic and effective ways to connect with our target audience.

It’s amazing to think about how much my role as a recruiter has changed over the last (almost) decade. When I started recruiting, the company I worked for (a progressive healthcare system) had paper applications. We filled our openings by attending career fairs and other recruitment events. Today at Garmin (an innovative technology company), we accept online applications, attend virtual career fairs, host a variety of recruitment events, and are inserting ourselves into the ever changing world of social media as it relates to recruitment. One thing that hasn’t changed? The value of networking. I look forward to meeting a variety of individuals at #NACE13: Career Services Representatives, College Recruiters, and other industry experts.

There are so many great workshops to attend, I’m not sure if I will be able to fit everything in. I’m lucky that a co-worker of mine is also attending, so we can tag team. Now comes the time to get strategic and prioritize! One workshop at the top of my list is “Social Media and College Recruits: Bring an “A Game.” The title alone speaks my language, and a bonus is that the presenter is an expert on this topic. Sign me up!

I’m happy to share the information I learn at #NACE13. Please stay tuned, because I will be blogging throughout the course of the conference, and I’m open to any questions/feedback.

Meet the #NACE12 Staff!

On Tuesday, the NACE (female) Staff Members are wearing bright blue polo shirts. If you need any assistance today, keep an eye out for anyone wearing these shirts and feel free to approach them. Below is the NACE staff photo taken this morning. If you see any of us out and about, make sure you say hello!

 NACE Staff at the 2012 Conference & Expo