Organize Your Workflow and Save Paper

Laura CraigLaura Craig, Assistant Director, Internships and Experiential Education, Temple University Career Center
Twitter: @BuckeyeVirginia

Happy summer semester everyone! Before you can get to the end of the summer, though, do you feel like you can get to your desk? Building on James Marable’s earlier post for the NACE 2015 Conference, I wanted to take a deeper dive into one of the apps he mentioned, Evernote.

Evernote bills itself as “the modern workspace that enables you to be your most productive.” It’s a cloud-based service that allows you to create text, photo, and audio notes across a range of interfaces, combine multiple forms of media into one note that you can share with others, and organize everything in a meaningful way for later use. It has radically changed how I look at productivity, and I hope it can do the same for you!

Here are three ideas from my workflow to help you make the most of Evernote:

Banish a blizzard of paper from your desk: Before Evernote, I planned everything out on paper and gathered more paper for handouts. Then I created physical file folders for all that paper and filed them away. My computer monitor was decorated with a wide array of Post-Its and other scraps of paper that were vitally important, but lacked a permanent home.

Not anymore!

Now, I create a new note with my ideas, and attach any ideas for handouts to that same note so I don’t have to hunt for them in multiple places. I organize individual notes into topical notebooks and tag categories across notebooks. The screenshot below shows you an example of note organization. You see my “Program Planning” notebook with historical/current data around past programs and supporting content I’d like to use for future programs. I’ve highlighted my tag list in yellow. This list allows me to group items by category across notebooks.

craig evernote desktop

I may have notes about how to use the Symplicity Counseling Module within this notebook, but I use the Counseling Module tag, highlighted in orange, to categorize everything I have about it in Evernote. 

To-do lists are also far more dynamic within Evernote. Instead of a list of static items, I can add additional information, updates, and next steps to accomplish each item. Once I complete an item, I don’t have to get rid of it if I don’t want to, making it easy to use it as a recurring to-do list.

Free your inbox from “reference” items: Raise your hand if your inbox contains hundreds or even thousands of items “for reference.” One of the best features of Evernote is that you can e-mail documents into your account and sort them into individual notebooks from the e-mail message. In the screenshot below, you’ll see that I’m sending a meeting agenda into my Temple University notebook, and the note will be tagged “communications.” It won’t get lost once you send it to Evernote because anything that’s in your account is searchable, so give your inbox a break!

craig evernote emailSlay the paper monster: I remember at my first job having folder upon folder of articles and ideas that I wanted to share with students. Did I ever do that? No—I never saw that paper again after I carefully filed it away. Two additional Evernote add-ons have really helped me cut down on the amount of physical paper I retain, making it more likely that I’ll use the paper I have.

Scannable App: This free iOS app allows you to capture high quality scans of any document and share directly into your Evernote account, as well as through other channels. I would call this a must have app to lighten your load!

Doxie Scanner: If you’ve got a bigger paper monster to slay, consider investing in a Doxie Scanner. These scanners are small, easy to use, and have great Evernote integration. The small size makes it easy to use for home and work, and you could also take this to #NACE16. I’ve probably scanned more than 2,000 pieces of paper with my Doxie, so they are quite durable.

Do you already use Evernote? What’s your favorite feature? What organizational project are you tackling at work this summer? Share your ideas in the comments.


Developing Career Goals Holistically

Melanie BufordMelanie Buford, Program Coordinator/Adjunct Instructor, Career Development Center, University of Cincinnati

Dan Blank, a career coach who works primarily with creative professionals, offers the following advice in his webinar “Take Back Your Creative Life.”

“Career goals should not be formed in isolation. You must take into account all of your responsibilities (personal and professional), and be sure to account for your own well-being. This includes physical and mental health.” Blank encourages his clients to integrate their career and personal goals in order to set themselves up for success.

Many undergraduate students start their career decision-making process by selecting a major based on the subjects they enjoyed in high school. Students interested in majoring in one of the applied sciences tend to follow this pattern. Several students I’ve worked with tell me they’ve chosen to major in engineering because they were “smart” in high school or strong in math and science, but they don’t know much about the field itself. Time and again, these students arrive at the career development center wondering why they’re not more interested in the engineering coursework and field experiences.

The problem isn’t engineering. The problem is that these students formed career goals in isolation. They didn’t consider the environment they’d be working in, the physical location of their organization, the skills they enjoy developing and want to build on, or the ways they hope to grow as people and as professionals. Fortunately, the University of Cincinnati provides a co-op program that allows engineering students to get full-time work experience before graduation.

Career goals, increasingly, need to be formed holistically. Gone are the days when choosing a career was simply a matter of matching your best school subject to an industry. The market is volatile; new opportunities are being created and other avenues are becoming less viable. A law career isn’t the safe choice it once was, and the nonprofit world has expanded to include diverse organizations tackling new social issues. It’s more common that professionals will relocate to a new city for a job opportunity, and more workers than ever are changing jobs and moving to new sectors over the course of their careers.

We are facing the so-called “paradox of choice.” Research has demonstrated that if we are presented with more opportunities, decision-making becomes more difficult and satisfaction less likely.

When a student steps into a career development office today, they’re faced with a much broader set of options than they would have been 30 years ago. They could go to medical school in their hometown or they could spend two years in the Peace Corps and teach grade school students in Lithuania. They could go to graduate school for computer science or launch a start-up with friends based on their ideas for a new app.

In order to make these decisions, students have to consider not only what talents they have, but what kind of life they want to lead.

It is critical, therefore, that students take a holistic approach to developing their career goals. We encourage them to apply this lens both to themselves and to the field they’re considering. Here are a few questions students should consider during the career exploration process:

What skills do I have and want to develop?

What type of work environment might best fit my temperament?

What type of diversity do I hope to have in my work environment?

How is the industry I’m considering expected to evolve in the next few decades?

What city, state, or country might I want to live in?

What have my career goals been and how have they changed?

What role would I like technology to play in my career?

How important is stability to me and how willing am I to take risks?

Each of these questions will take time to answer as students develop more clarity on their identities and values. Is it any wonder career goals formed at age 18 often feel premature? These are questions we wrestle with throughout our lives.

To me, this only underscores the importance of committing to a continuous career development process, not just for students, but for graduates. Attempting to build your life looking only through a narrow lens of career is bound to work against your happiness. We must support students around this process by acknowledging its complexity and encouraging them to consider the multiple implications of a potential career path.

NACE members can pick up a student-directed version of this blog, Develop Your Career Goals Holistically, in Grab & Go.


Blank, Dan. (2015). Take Back Your Creative Life Webinar. We Grow Media.

Cole, Marine. (2014). U.S. Job Market Has Changed Dramatically in 15 Year. The Fiscal Times.

Hedges, Kristi. (2012). The Surprising Poverty of Too Many Choices. Forbes.


Is Career Fair Networking Really So Hard? Four Tips for Students

Kathy DouglasKathy Douglas, Associate Director Career Development Office, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Twitter: @fescdo

If you are in a Google group, are a member of a family, or met someone at your college or university orientation who is still your friend, you already know how to network. We meet, form bonds, text, and call our friends to share good news. As a species, we are natural networkers—our survival depends on it.

Schmoozing at career fairs and events is what most people think of when defining networking—standing out in a crowd or making a lasting impression that will land you a job or internship. The reality for most mortals is, however, that although it is important to practice small talk and have good interpersonal skills, most of us do not exude extraordinarily magnetic personalities.

Working magic in a crowd, in fact, is not the most important part of networking.

Great networkers know what any career fair recruiter will tell you: At the end of the day, recruiters’ feet hurt, their voices are raw, and aside from a few exceptional interactions, they have spoken with so many individuals they don’t remember who they spoke with about what.

This is why the real art of job-search networking comes in after the actual fair—in the follow up.

When advising students on strategies for two major annual career fairs (one for 1,300+ students from eight universities; one for 250 students from two universities), I emphasize four things:

  1. Strategically select top employers to visit: Quick Internet research provides information to help determine which employers align best with your career goals. Arrive early and visit your top choices while you (and the recruiters) are fresh.
  2. Ask good questions: Advanced research will help you prepare smart questions. After a quick introduction, ask a question about recruiting level or specific practice areas to be sure you are not wasting your time or theirs—Are you hiring at the masters level? Are you interviewing for your renewables practice? If you already know what they are recruiting for, start there—“I’d like to learn more about the project areas for the policy internships.”
  3. After discussions, find a place to stop and take notes: Notes don’t have to be extensive. I use business cards and/or a small notebook to write the reason I want to follow up, contact information, and content of conversation.
  4. Follow up within a few days: Decide which leads are of interest and follow up with an e-mail that picks up where the discussion left off. If you have been directed to an online application, complete it, send the recruiter a thank you and let them know you applied. If you connected personally with a recruiter, but there is no immediate opportunity for you, send them a thank you note and a LinkedIn request. There is no need to follow up on every single contact. It’s okay to be strategic.

If you have taken good notes after a productive conversation, it is easy to follow up. And most often you are doing the recruiter a favor. The work you put in to making the recruiter’s job easier, whether it results in an immediate outcome for you or not, is a positive and generous act.

And you never know where follow-up will lead. Through courteous follow up and strategic networking, job seekers get interviews, discover the hidden job market, and learn the inside scoop on organizations.

NACE members can pick up a free student-directed copy of this blog for use online or in publications.

When the Changing Professional Culture Is Challenging

katie smith at duke universityKatie Smith, Assistant Director, Duke University Career Center,
Twitter: @ksmith258

Checking the morning e-mail flood, there’s one from*, the alias of a student that I met with recently. He asked how to network appropriately with an alumna who had just sent out a job opportunity.

His question is typical. His e-mail address, not so much. It made me smile, but gave me pause. Is it professionally appropriate?

I have a “bad” resume example that I use when teaching students about resumes, and the group usually giggles over the address. We can agree that it’s not a very professional address, and we all know it’s a pretty tame example.
If this student was looking for an opportunity as a programmer at a small, funky tech company, the gaming reference might be appreciated and I might have let it go. However, since he’s looking into a more conservative field, I decide to bring the e-mail address to his attention, reminding him that some people may not see it as professional. It turns out that the student is surprised I can see his e-mail alias at all—he thought he was communicating through his school-sanctioned account, which is linked to his personal account.

What’s “professional” seems to be an increasingly challenging question for students to navigate. When it comes to communication, traditional advice has retained traction; employers and alumni visiting Duke’s campus consistently share anecdotes about the importance of writing skills, professional e-mail communication, and appropriate uses of social media to represent oneself and one’s company.

We think we know how to advise on writing professional application materials, until a student asks which “Game of Thrones” character she should feature in her short essay, or when another student asks for feedback on the poem he wrote in place of a cover letter—two examples of students responding to company prompts.
A recent job description that came through my e-mail recommended, for example, that students submit: “A resume (if you have one), your year in school, a list of relevant coursework, your favorite movie, a city/country you’ve never been to but want to see, your favorite programming language, and your favorite breakfast. Get into it, I love breakfast.”

It is fun, yes, but it’s confusing. Should a non-breakfast-eating student be honest about his preference? How will that be perceived? What would a student who doesn’t watch “Game of Thrones” say?

As advisers providing feedback on these type of questions, conversations regarding organizational culture and authenticity are often invoked. Students walk a fine line between demonstrating personality and maintaining professionalism.

Gone are the days when we can turn students around at the door of an open career fair because they aren’t dressed professionally. The employers themselves often tend to show up in branded T-shirts, jeans, and even goofy hamburger-shaped hats, and many are seeking students whose casual dress reflects their own organizational culture.
I’ve seen students conduct successful in-person interviews with the top tech companies in the world…while wearing sweatpants. Traditional advice suggests dressing one step above what you expect your employer to be wearing, but what does one wear to a career fair when one target company is wearing T-shirts, and another is wearing a formal business suit? How does one introduce herself when one company is expecting jokes and magic tricks, and another a traditional elevator pitch?

They’re tricky questions.

Students will benefit by knowing that there is never a single “right” answer, and that they can help themselves each step of the way by preparing and conducting research into culture and expectations prior to contact or communication. Career professionals can, and should, do the same. While not everyone is ready to ditch professionalism as it was once known, we do need to be prepared to help students navigate new environments effectively. Having an understanding and appreciation for burgeoning creative, casual, and open cultures will help us all prepare students for the jobs of the future.

*E-mail address has been changed to protect student privacy.

Five Visual Content Tools to Help You Stand Out

Amanda Carchedi

Amanda Carchedi, University of Connecticut Publicity and Marketing Administrator, Center for Career Development

Anyone who has been tasked with managing social media for his or her organization knows that creating and curating visual content that students will finding engaging and interesting is a full-time job. Unfortunately, not every office is able to have a dedicated social media manager or graphic designer, leaving this time-consuming task as an extra responsibility for a member of your staff or, if you’re lucky, a student worker. However, there are time-saving tools available (for free!) that can help your department create stunning images for your social media and beyond. Whether you are looking for a quick image to post on Instagram or an informational graphic to add to your blog or website, there are ways to simplify these processes. Here are a few tools that can help: allows you to create stunning infographics in minutes. Choose from thousands of infographic templates and design elements that can be customized to create visual representations of information and ideas.


If you don’t have a designer on your team, Canva can help you create designs for web or print. Choose from more than 1 million photos and hundreds of fonts to make the perfect image. The free online program also allows you to easily edit photos and collaborate between staff members.


Iconfinder is a library of more than 340,000 icons that can be used to spice up any design. Choose from a variety of free options or purchase icons for as low as $1.

Turn your data into beautiful charts and infographics using allows you to visualize your data using a variety of templates. You can then simply share your images on a website or blog using the provided embedded code.


Pablo helps you design engaging images for social media quickly and easily. Choose from the available background photos or upload your own image, and insert the text you would like to appear over your image. Done.

Got a favorite image creation tool? Please share in the comments!


NACE15 Revisited: Putting Learning Into Action

joe hayesJoe Hayes, Assistant Director, Employer Relations & Internships, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Twitter: @_JosephHayes

You know a conference was beneficial when your return flight home is delayed several hours and a 4 a.m. arrival doesn’t feel that bad. Perhaps the long delay was a needed blessing in that it forced reflection on all things learned at NACE15. I’d almost go as far to say “thank you” unidentified airline for the delay, but those would be words uttered by no one ever.

The 2015 NACE Conference provided many nuggets of information that I hope (and some I have already begun) to implement into our work—ultimately benefiting the student-employer relationship.

COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere
First, Lindsey Pollak’s keynote was inspiring. There could honestly be an entire blog on this alone. From the Millennial shift from traditional employment to “tours of duty,” and the basic skills that need to be taught (the handshake, how to answer a phone, and interesting items such as “how to fail” and “how to resign.”)—Ms. Pollak was the right speaker at the right time to kick off the first full day at NACE.

A quick takeaway and action item from Ms. Pollak’s talk centered on how to connect with the largest work force in America—Millennials. Here, Ms. Pollak described COPE, “create one, publish everywhere.” This mantra illustrates the importance of connecting with students in a manner that best resonates with them—which to Millennials, can be everything and anything. For example, in career services we often create professional development trainings for students. Following the COPE method, we will continue to host training events, but will look to make it more lasting. This may include not only having the event, but live tweeting from it, streaming the event live, recording and re-using it on our website, pushing it out via audio recording, publishing the text translation, featuring it in a future newsletter, and so forth. In other words, use technology to the fullest to target those that may prefer to get their information in various formats.

In addition to COPE, and in similar fashion, customization toward the user/student was a central theme of NACE15. In other words, asking your target audience for feedback and customizing it toward them can and will be critical for success.

On my first day back from NACE, our office, the Academic and Career Development Center, was looking to further increase student usage of our office-run job and internship listing system—UNO Career Connect. One suggestion was whether our current branding was customized in messaging to students. We examined the listing system tag line—“UNO Career Connect: Connecting UNO to Career Opportunities” versus a shortened alternative title.

Following the theme of customization, we ran short focus groups around campus—asking students, faculty and staff what best resonated with them. To our surprise, nearly 80 percent of faculty and staff supported the former and nearly 80 percent of students (the intended audience) supported the latter—with feedback from students stating, “Say what it is,” and “Less is more.” This complete opposite feedback is making us rethink how we target to and get buy-in from students, and ensure our services are customized.

NACE15 left a positive impression and provided many lasting takeaways that can easily and effectively be implemented in our daily work. Now if only NACE could help solve airline delays!

Redefining Professional Development for Career Advisers

Ross WadeRoss Wade, Assistant Director, Duke University Career Center
Personal blog:
LinkedIn URL:
Twitter: @rrwade
Blogs from Ross Wade.

Does professional development for career services staff need an update? Is the model of “go to a conference or do an assessment training” still as relevant as career services is changing so much and so quickly? What can we do to grow as professionals, connect more with employers and alumni, and gain credibility with our students and other stakeholders? I think it is time to consider redefining what professional development for career services staff means, and how it is done. I’m not talking about ditching annual conferences, they are of great value, what I’m saying is I think it is time to add a few more options.

In July of 2014, Farouk Dey and Christine Y. Cruzvergara, co-authored an article called “10 Future Trends in College Career Services.” Number 10 in their inspiring and thought provoking piece, “New Breed of Professionals,” resonated with me—especially the statement, “To be successful, career center staff must become agile content experts and network catalysts who will lead communities and develop meaningful connections among their constituents.” In my experience, in order to gain credibility with students, having experience in the field in which I advise (media, arts, and entertainment) is very important. When I tell students that I’ve worked in documentary and digital media, and know of some great companies that could be a good fit for them (based on my personal experience) I get student buy-in very quickly.

My ideas for tweaking career services staff professional development options involve creating opportunities for gaining industry experience; generating and growing relationships with employers, alumni, faculty, and staff; and serve as a means for staff to gain some “street cred” (with students, employers, and faculty).

The concept of career staff having the option to do some form of industry internship during the summer is very exciting to me. The internship doesn’t have to be full-time; it could be eight to 10 hours a week over four to six weeks. The internship could be hands-on, or more observational and include informational interviews. Regardless of the specifics, this experience would give staff a chance to understand industry skills and trends as well as positions and roles within specific industries and companies, and the chance to connect with experts and HR professionals.

For example, there is a wonderful art start-up in my area connecting artists to consumers via social media and storytelling—I’d love to intern there, creating content, connecting with artists, and growing the art scene in my community. Think of all the connections I’d make and skills I’d learn. My improved knowledge of this industry and number of contacts in art I’d make would generate credibility with faculty and students.

Approaching employers with the idea of hiring an “adult”/career staff intern may at first raise some eyebrows, but just as we tell our students, if one creates a pitch and plan (with a timeline, tasks, and goals), that is brand new or a modified version of an existing internship program, what could we lose? Don’t want to intern at company? Try an internship at another office at your institution.

For example, it would be a great opportunity to intern with the communications office at my home institution, or in the multicultural center. Think of the new connections to be made and opportunities to find points for future collaboration! Is research your thing? Approach a faculty member focused on an industry or topic of relevance to career development, and pitch a research idea. Spend 10 or so hours a week during the summer researching and writing. Career staff doing research with faculty – whaaaat?! It may sound crazy, but I think it is a wonderful idea, and I bet it is already happening at institutions across the country.

Other benefits include staff cross training opportunities after the internship or research is completed, heightened staff engagement and excitement, and great content (e.g. photos, blog posts, interviews with professionals) to share across campus via social media to generate interest in career services. What ideas do you have? I’d love to get employer thoughts on this. How would you redefine professional development for career services staff?