The Assessment Diaries: Rubric Roundup

Desalina Allen

Desalina Allen, Senior Assistant Director at NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development
Twitter: @DesalinaAllen
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/desalina

I recently wrote about the problem with asking students to assess their own learning. In a nutshell—studies show we are not able to accurately measure our own learning and that we even tend to overestimate what we have learned.

This concept can definitely be applied to resumes.  Even the best resume presentation or one-on-one review isn’t always enough to really teach students what makes an excellent vs. just an OK resume.  We already know this anecdotally—when students come back for two, three, or four reviews and haven’t yet mastered some of the basics it demonstrates just how complex marketing yourself on paper can be.  Thus, we cannot use students’ self-reported learning after these events or meetings as evidence that they really learned. 

As career services professionals, we could critique resumes in our sleep.  I know I’ve easily reviewed thousands of resumes in my five short years working in career development! For this reason, when we want an accurate understanding of how well our students are marketing themselves via their resumes it makes more sense for us as experts to evaluate them.

Enter resume rubrics. Rubrics are a way to standardize the way we define and measure something.  They also make our evaluation techniques more transparent and clear to students and can be a useful tool in training new staff members.

When I started developing a rubric for NYU Wasserman, I found it extremely helpful to look at examples from NACE and other schools.  I then created a draft and brought it first to my assessment team and then to staff as a whole for feedback.  Several revisions later, we had a document that made explicit what we look for in a resume.  More specifically, we defined what makes an excellent resume vs. a good resume vs. one that needs improvement.

Once you have your rubric, you can track and report on how your students are doing as a whole (or by class year, major, etc.).  If you have enough time and patience, you can also follow a student’s progress over time or after a specific resume intervention. For example, evaluate a student’s resume before a workshop and then encourage them to come back with changes and evaluate it again.  Did they improve? Which topics were still difficult to grasp? Might you need to spend more time addressing those during the workshop?

Below you will find some examples of resume rubrics that I have found helpful, as well as the rubric we use at NYU.  Do you use rubrics at your institution?  If so, please share them in the comments section!

Examples:
NACE (Resume), ReadWriteThink (Resume and Cover Letter), Amherst Career Center (Resume), Illinois State (Resume), Liberty University (Online Resume)

NYU Wasserman:

Don’t miss “The Mystery of the Resume Writing Assessment” Part 1 and Part 2.

Read more of Desalina Allen’s blogs on assessment!

100 Days Until #NACE14!

Chaim ShapiroChaim Shapiro
Website: http://chaimshapiro.com/
Twitter: @chaimshapiro
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chaimshapiro

People seem to like even numbers. Logically, there is no reason why people feel a stronger connection to 100 versus 99 or 101, but no matter, because today marks 100 days until the NACE 2014 Conference in San Antonio.  If you are like me, you already have your countdown timer set (see here: http://bit.ly/NACE14_Countdown ) but, if you haven’t, what are you waiting for?

The conference is YOUR opportunity to take an active role in charting the future of our profession.  It is your chance to engage and provide your feedback on all the major issues facing our profession (someone once made a GREAT video about that: http://youtu.be/wT1hxrz64R4).  There is also NO better time to meet your colleagues than at the conference.  It is the BEST networking event of the year. You can look for me, I will be wearing a VERY special hat in honor of my workshop: “Be the Davy Crockett of the LinkedIn Frontier! (My workshop focuses on what you need to know to empower your students to harness the full power of LinkedIn. Learn the inside tricks and tips to identify and engage decision makers who can act as the crucial link to sourcing and employment opportunities for your students.)

You might not want to tell your boss, but having attended numerous conferences, I can also attest that they are a LOT of fun, and there are plenty of opportunities to take in the local sights (although I hope my Chicago Blackhawks will be back in the Stanley Cup Championship, keeping me tethered to the TV at night).

The Early Bird Special ends on March 1.  February is that sneaky month with 28 days, so remember that March 1 is tomorrow!  Remember the Alamo and sign up today! http://naceweb.org/ConferenceExpo/register.htm

NACE Flash Poll: Will Social Media Replace the Resume?

kevin grubbNACE Ambassador Kevin Grubb
Assistant Director at Villanova University’s Career Center.
Twitter: @kevincgrubb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevingrubb
Blog: “social @ edu”

The use of social media in recruiting is a hot topic that’s not cooling down anytime soon. College recruiters consider a candidate’s online presence carefully, and college students use social media to learn about and connect with employers of choice.

A 2012 Forbes article, Facebook Can Tell You if A Person is Worth Hiring, cites research from Northern Illinois University which “suggests a person’s Facebook page can predict job performance and academic success.” This PCMag article discusses Klout’s possible influence on hiring decisions. And, of course, we all know how influential LinkedIn has been in recruiting lately. All of this talk has many speculating that “social media is the new resume.”

So, NACE blog readers, weigh in: do you think social media will replace the resume? Vote in the poll and share your thoughts on the future in a comment!

The Trouble With Job Postings

Janet R. LongJanet R. Long
Principal, Integrity Search Inc.
Blog: http://inyourownvoice.wordpress.com/
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/janetrlong/
Twitter: @IntegritySearch

Teaching students to navigate and reply effectively to job postings—whether through internal referral systems or external job sites—is a tenet of most career development curricula. There are valuable skills to teach, from developing pointed, persuasive communication to learning to think from an employer’s perspective.

The question is, do these skills go far enough?  Are we preparing today’s emerging graduates to become tomorrow’s passive and complacent  job seekers? The trouble with job postings is that they represent only a snapshot of potential opportunities out there. What’s more, they drive large volumes of traffic to a relative handful of jobs, creating instant and intense competition for every role.

When working in private practice with mid-career job seekers, I encourage them to use the 80/20  rule when it comes to postings. That is, to spend about 20 percent of search time replying to advertised opportunities, and the remaining  80 percent using these postings as a springboard to inform a more pro-active approach.

It’s not too early to give our students the gift of this perspective.  Beyond first-destination landings, it will empower them to propel their efforts beyond the too-frequent black hole of applicant tracking systems designed to weed out rather than invite in.

Here are three ways to help our students look at and leverage job postings to get ahead of the curve:

1) Target employers of interest. Never mind if there’s not a current posting related to a specific area. If this employer is in hiring mode, more relevant roles may develop at any moment. Encourage your students to follow companies on social media, seeking  informal introductions to  internal recruiters. This helps the recruiter as well, who is often measured on metrics such as “time to fill” open roles. Having a talent pipeline for tomorrow’s openings is a strategic advantage—and it allows for informal dialogue before a cast of thousands applies to a specific posting.

2) Looks at what’s trending. On Twitter and beyond, the advertised portion of the job market is a researcher’s paradise! For instance, your students can look for common job titles and descriptive language, even in areas outside of their target geography. This gives them the right vocabulary to use when seeking out networking connections as well as to suggest potential titles and skill areas on their own resumes and LinkedIn profiles.

3) Go for the bold.  Many students already have a dream company in mind when they come to you for help and guidance. Take a tour together of the company’s website and job listings, Twitter feed, LinkedIn page, etc., and help them learn to identify challenges waiting to be solved by a smart, passionate new graduate. Show them how to put this insight to use with existing institutional resources such as alumni networks as well as their own emerging networks. Sometimes it pays to take a risk and reach out to higher-level individuals—it’s an old hiring tenet that you can get referred down the food chain but rarely up!

Have your students tried these techniques?  What are some success stories?

The One Thing Underlying Really Good Career Advice

kevin grubbNACE Ambassador Kevin Grubb
Assistant Director at Villanova University’s Career Center.
Twitter: @kevincgrubb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevingrubb
Blog: “social @ edu”.

How many times during any given year do you say something like the following statements?

  • “At the career fair, make the first move and introduce yourself to the company representatives with a smile and strong handshake.”
  • “It’s a good idea to create and manage a great social media presence online: have you made a LinkedIn profile yet?”
  • “Effective networking is one of the most essential elements to a successful job search. You have to put yourself out there.”

The answer is probably “a zillion.”

These pieces of career advice are frequently mentioned around the web and in career centers across the country. For good reason, too—they’re all important messages for any job seeker to hear. In 2013, I started paying attention to them more, and specifically, the resistance felt from the recipients of this advice. What was it that made some people quick to act on these words and others hesitant about it?

There was one theme that struck me most: courage. Courage underlies these pieces of advice. It’s taking action on something even when facing the fear of it.

Take the student whom you know is top notch on paper. You’ve seen her resume: she’s academically stellar with noteworthy experiences in and out of the classroom. But, she’s not one to generate a conversation. Simply advising her to introduce herself to an employer at a career fair might not work. She might need not only the “how to” of proper introductions, but also some time spent building the courage to do it.

Or, how about the student who is interested in journalism? One great piece of advice for him might be to start a blog. Not only would this give him a venue to practice his work, it would also give him the opportunity to invite others to read it. Perhaps it could turn into a portfolio of writing samples for future job applications. Beyond the instructions for setting up a blog and tips on effective posts, it may take some courage building to help him get comfortable with the idea of putting his work out there.

When I’m talking with someone who’s hesitant about following these pieces of advice, I ask them to identify the cause of their nervousness. Once a fear is named, we can create a plan to address it together. Maybe it’s writing a few “blog posts” and e-mailing them only to close family and friends to get experience hearing feedback. It could be setting the goal of initiating one in person introduction per week, even among peers on campus, until things feel comfortable. Experiencing a few small wins can build the momentum to something bigger.

NACE blog readers, what are your thoughts on courage in career conversations?

Life Lessons From the Chicago Cubs

Chaim ShapiroChaim Shapiro
Website: http://chaimshapiro.com/
Twitter: @chaimshapiro
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chaimshapiro

February 13, 2014 probably doesn’t mean much to most people, but to die-hard Chicago Cubs fans like me, it is one of the most important days of the year.  Pitchers and catchers report for their first day of Cubs spring training camp today.

“People often laugh at the hapless Cubs—not to mention their fans. The Cubs, often dubbed as the “lovable losers” have not won a World Series in 105 years—not since 1908 (as the joke goes in Chicago, any team can have a bad century).”

No, they aren’t picked to be a contender, and I have been predicting a championship EVERY year for the last 37 years, but I am going to put my heart and soul into rooting for them once again (I am sorry, Dan Black, I have NO compassion for Yankees fans who are worried about not making the playoffs).

Disappointment is a fact of life to Cubs fans, and yet, every year, without fail, we bounce back (after short recriminations about Billy Goat curses and Steve Bartman), relishing the new opportunity of a fresh season.  We have been dealt crushing blows in 2003 and 1984 (and 1969 for those who are old enough to remember), yet we always bounce back the following year with the same level of optimism.

I would argue that there is an important life lesson to be learned from Cubs fans.  We have all been disappointed. We have all put in the time and effort only to see a project or an idea fail. The real question is what you do next? Do you give up or do you rededicate yourself to achieving your goal?  After you fail, do you put the same time, effort, and passion into your next attempt? If you don’t you have a LOT to learn from the “lovable losers” and their fans, because I guarantee  you after 105 years of team and 36 seasons of personal heartbreak and disappointment, without a doubt, 2014 is Anno Catuli, (Latin for Year of the Cub)!

The Assessment Diaries: The Mystery of the Resume Writing Assessment (Part 2)

Desalina Allen

Desalina Allen, Senior Assistant Director at NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development
Twitter: @DesalinaAllen
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/desalina

When we last left off, you were shocked at the fact that your post-resume writing seminar survey results could have been so misleading.  Students reported to have learned the basics of resume writing but, when you followed up with an in-person meeting with one of your attendees, it was obvious that the tips and guidelines you provided were not applied.

Have you ever created or taken a survey with a question or questions like the ones below?

This seminar improved my understanding of resume writing basics:
Strongly Disagree/Disagree/Neutral/Agree/Strongly Agree

I learned something from this seminar:
True/False

As a result of this seminar, I now understand what employers look for in a resume:
Strongly Disagree/Disagree/Neutral/Agree/Strongly Agree

What is the problem here?  Well, if you are simply looking for evidence that students believe they have learned something from your event there is no problem at all.  But, if you are trying to collect evidence that students actually learned something well then …..

Why? Because studies show* that students are not able to accurately measure their own growth or learning.  Not only do they incorrectly estimate growth, they tend to overestimate it.  It makes sense, right? If someone asks you after a presentation or a class if you learned something, how do you really know if you did?  

As a result of this, we cannot use students’ self-reported growth as evidence of growth.  Instead, we have to utilize other assessment methods to really prove they learned something.  How? By doing a pre- and post-assessment of student knowledge (like I did for our etiquette dinner) and comparing results, or coming up with a standardized way to evaluate resumes (via a rubric) and look at the change over time.

Last year, one of our learning goals was to ensure that students were learning career- related skills like resume writing.  We did away with our post seminar surveys and instead created resume rubrics to use with students.  I’ll be sharing that experience in my next few posts, along with helpful resources if your office is look to create your own resume rubrics!
*Thank you to Sonia DeLuca Fernandez, our Director of Research and Assessment for Student Affairs, for this article that can be found in Research and Practice in Assessment, Volume 8.