Using Facebook to Easily Connect Students and Employers

Smedstad-Headshot

Shannon Smedstad, Employer Branding & HR Social Media, Geico
Twitter: @shannonsmedstad
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/shannonsmedstad

Before we jump into the meat of this post, I’ve got a few initial questions for you …

EMPLOYERS: Does your company have a career-related Facebook page?

CAREER CENTERS: Do you have a Facebook page?

BOTH: Could you be doing more with your page?

If you answered “yes” to two out of three of these questions, please keep reading.

Most people know that Facebook is good for sharing photos and status updates. But, what if we could use Facebook as a virtual career fair platform? How exactly would that work?

facebook_logoThe Magic of Facebook for College Recruiting

You can access Facebook from anywhere: desktop, phone, dorm room, or in-between classes. You can chat with an individual or group. You can share information and link to jobs. Some recruiters already use Facebook to connect with job-seeking students.

As the manager of a corporate career page on Facebook, I have now successfully led three virtual career fairs … right on Facebook!

  • June 2013: More than 230 people engaged with recruiters over a two-day virtual career fair. Hires were made!
  • November 2013: We took a more targeted approach and attracted 75 students to our page during a one-day fair. It cost us less than $50.
  • April 2014: Co-hosted a virtual career fair with a collegiate honor society and grew our followers by 3 percent in one day and organic reach was the highest it’s been year-to-date. It’s still too early to know if we’ve made any hires—my fingers are crossed!

Advice and Lessons Learned

When it comes to social media, you have to be willing to take some calculated risks and try new things. Social platforms are designed for real time communication; we just have to be creative in our thinking to create opportunities to do just that.

To me, these Facebook career fairs fall into the low risk/low cost/potential high reward category. It’s all about the planning, promotion, human resources, and execution of the plan, not how much it costs. Here are some of my top tips for anyone interested in hosting your own virtual event:

  • Determine your audience and whether you have any existing partners that will work through this idea with you.
  • Give yourself plenty of time to create a targeted, multi-channel promotional plan.
  • Visual imagery is important in attracting talent and sharing details of the event.
  • Schedule a pre-fair call with the recruiters to talk through what to expect and how you might want to handle certain requests or situations.
  • Make sure that your page (booth) is properly manned during the allotted career fair time, and for a day or two after (questions continue to trickle in).
  • Measure results using Facebook Insights, ATS data, and feedback from the entire team to determine whether the event was successful and worth doing again.

Since our most recent event, we’ve had two student organizations reach out with interest to our team. When you can bring people, technology, and opportunities together for the greater good … it’s a beautiful thing. Thanks, Facebook.

Career Coaching Notes: Dream Job Activity

Rayna AndersonRayna A. Anderson, Career Adviser at Elon University
Twitter: @Rayna_Anderson
LinkedIn: www.LinkedIn.com/in/RaynaA
Blog: RaynaAnderson.wordpress.com

Sometimes, students are clueless on where they should begin their job or internship search. They may not be able to think past the obvious words associated with their course of study, like: finance, psychology, or business. So before they begin to look for opportunities based on these broad terms, I require them to have a bit of fun with the search.

First, based on the student’s expressed interests, assessment results, or current major, I have them conduct an ordinary search using a major job board. I don’t give them any special instructions, other than to look for a position that they could not realistically apply for right away; they simply need to find a job that really excites them. Once they have found their “dream job” posting, we use it as a motivational tool and guide for what jobs or internships they may actually qualify for.

Dream Job for Career Planning/Motivation:

For this portion of the exercise, the “education” or “experience” sections of the dream job description will be most helpful. This information gives the student insight into what skills or credentials they might be lacking, and in enough time for them to start acquiring them. By conducting a gap analysis, they can identify some differences between what they have to offer and what the employer is looking for. The dream job posting is a tangible reminder that with the right planning, they could someday have a position like this.

Student Self-Assessment:

  1. Am I on the right academic path to someday qualify for this job?
  2. What experience can I get now to better prepare me?

Dream Job as a Search Guide

Based on the “job duties “or “skills” sections of the dream job posting, the student should highlight words that they are naturally drawn to. This might include keywords such as: “patient,” “direct,” “counsel,” “analyze,” “create,” or “research”. Now, the student is ready to combine some of these specific words with broader terms to find internships or entry-level jobs that they actually qualify for.

Student Self-Assessment:

  1. Which of these job duties am I most excited to perform?
  2. Are their entry-level jobs that include some of these same skills and responsibilities?

By having the student first find a dream job posting, they are able to identify their instinctive interests and where they’d want to be in a few years. This way, even if they fall short of securing this type of position, they are further along than they would have been if they’d never began planning their education and professional development based on their ideal job!

Read more from Rayna Anderson!

Good Advice: The Best Graduation Gift of All

sue-keever-wattsSue Keever Watts
Owner, The Keever Group
Blog: http://keevergroup.wordpress.com/
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/sue-keever-watts/0/aa/b60
Twitter: @SueKeever

 

50 Rules Your Children Won’t Learn in School was written by Charles J. Sykes in 1996. Sykes offers honest, sometimes harsh advice to students about the real world. Whether you’re about to say goodbye to students for the summer or hello to graduates who will soon join your organization, it’s a good time to revisit a few of Sykes’ words of wisdom.

Rule 1: Life is not fair – get used to it!

Rule 2: The world won’t care about your self-esteem. The world will expect you to accomplish something BEFORE you feel good about yourself.

Rule 3: You will NOT make $60,000 a year right out of high school. You won’t be a vice-president with a car phone until you earn both.

Rule 4: You think your teacher is tough? Wait till you get a boss.

Rule 5: Flipping burgers is not beneath your dignity. Your grandparents had a different word for burger flipping—they called it opportunity.

Rule 6: If you mess up, it’s not your parents’ fault, so don’t whine about your mistakes, learn from them.

Rule 7: Before you were born, your parents weren’t as boring as they are now. They got that way from paying your bills, cleaning your clothes, and listening to you talk about how cool you thought you were. So before you save the rain forest from the parasites of your parent’s generation, try delousing the closet in your own room.

Rule 8: Your school may have done away with winners and losers, but life HAS NOT. In some schools, they have abolished failing grades and they’ll give you as MANY TIMES as you want to get the right answer. This doesn’t bear the slightest resemblance to ANYTHING in real life.

Rule 9: Life is not divided into semesters. You don’t get summers off and very few employers are interested in helping you FIND YOURSELF. Do that on your own time.

Rule 10: Be nice to nerds. Chances are you’ll end up working for one.

Read more from Sue Keever Watts.

 

 

Shine Bright: How to Stand Out at Job Fairs, Networking Events, and More

Lakeisha MathewsLakeisha M. Mathews, Director, Career and Professional Development Center, University of Baltimore
Twitter: @RightResumes_CC
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/lakeishamathews/

Pop singer Rihanna’s 2012 song titled “Diamonds” topped the charts in more than 20 countries and became her 12th number-one single going quadruple platinum and selling more than 7.5 million copies worldwide. The song is about a couple’s love that is so strong it shines bright as a diamond. The chorus is my favorite part, where the singer chants: “Shine bright like a diamond…You’re a shooting star I see…So shine bright…We’re beautiful like diamonds in the sky.”

It’s not the song’s love story that strikes me the most, but the vivid imagery of two people being able to stand out amongst a crowd. To me, there is a correlation between standing out in a crowd and successful participation in networking events such as job fairs. Knowing how you stand out and shine in a crowd is relevant for students looking for work, launching careers, and seeking to build professional brands in today’s chaotic and competitive workplace. Professional brands are built on the ability to determine what separates you from another job seeker. Instead of teaching our students to look, act and sound like every other job seeker, we must teach them to shine and stand out from others.

We have all heard the 55/38/7 rule which asserts that success is based 55 percent on what you look like, 38  percent on what you sound like, and 7 percent on what you say. Oftentimes, students attend job fairs and networking events but leave without having established new connections or serious job prospects, not because they weren’t prepared, but because they didn’t stand out. When asked why they failed to broaden their network, students usually place the blame on the employer—saying the employer was not really looking to hire anyone. I turn the table, placing the responsibility with the student, because it’s no longer the early bird that gets the worm, but the bird that shows up and shines bright!

Building a professional brand that shines and stands out at networking events starts with developing a strong self-concept. That is, understanding your strengths, interests, skills, and talents, which all combine to shape your professional brand. This is a challenge for most young adults and even some career changers. To help students of all ages and backgrounds develop a strong awareness of their brand and identify their value factors—areas they shine in—I use the 55/38/7 rule:

What I Look Like (Physical – 55 percent):
– Wearing appropriate and professional attire
– Ensuring a stylish polished look
– Understanding your best features and how to enhance them

What I Sound Like (Verbal & Nonverbal – 38 percent):
– Strong public speaking skills – confidence, clarity, conviction
– Positive nonverbals – handshake, eye contact, good posture, and a smile

What I Say (Content – 7 percent):
– Captivating professional pitch
– Ability to articulate what you have to offer
– Thorough knowledge of the company and/or industry

It’s important to note that as career professionals, we probably spend more time working with a student on what they say and less on what they look like and how they speak, both of which carry weight in the employment process. Successful professionals and those who rise to the top of their company or industry are noticed first for how they look and sound before anyone cares to hear what they have to say. Challenging students to work on all three areas of their professional brand will help them develop an authentic professional brand that shines bright in the labor market.

Read more from Lakeisha Mathews.

Career Coaching Notes: 7 Powerful Questions

Rayna AndersonRayna A. Anderson, Career Advisor at Elon University
Twitter: @Rayna_Anderson
LinkedIn: www.LinkedIn.com/in/RaynaA
Blog: RaynaAnderson.wordpress.com

Considering that our job is not to give answers, but instead is to guide others toward self-discovery, powerful questioning can make all the difference in an advising session. The list below is a short compilation of questions I’ve collected over time, and concludes with my most recent favorite:

  1. What do you daydream about the most?
  2. What have been some of your proudest moments?
  3. If you wrote a book that could improve the world, what would it be about?
  4. If you had to go back to school tomorrow, what would you major in?
  5. What do you want to be known for after you retire?
  6. If you didn’t have to go to class/work tomorrow but still had to work, what type of work would you do?
  7. What excites you?

The last question was taken from The 4-Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss. In the book, Ferriss states that, “Excitement is the more practical synonym for happiness, and it is precisely what you should strive to chase. It is the cure-all.” He argues that most people will never know what they want and that this question is a more precise alternative that reflects the actual objective. If you have any powerful questions that you often use with students or clients, comment and share below!  

Read more from Rayna Anderson.

The Assessment Diaries: Quick and Qualitative

Desalina Allen

Desalina Allen, Senior Assistant Director at NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development
Twitter: @DesalinaAllen
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/desalina

Some of the assessment activities I have shared take time to develop (like the Pre/Post Dining Etiquette Survey) and/or require staff buy-in, training and socialization (like the Resume Rubrics).  Just last week, I decided super last minute that I wanted to assess a networking presentation for international students…last minute, as in, 20 minutes before the event. This exercise is proof that assessment doesn’t have to take hours and hours of your time—sometimes a quick pre/post writing exercise can give you insight into what needs to be changed about a program.

I need to invoke my earlier reminder that I promised to be honest when sharing my experiences with assessment, and this post is no different.  I’d like to say I was happy with these results, when instead I was disappointed to find that I probably assessed the wrong learning goal. I started with the fact that I wanted students to gain a more nuanced understanding of networking. Here’s what I did:

Twenty minutes before the presentation I grabbed some colorful paper—yellow would be used for my pre-assessment and pink for the post assessment. This color choice was not at all based on any carefully planned and research-supported theory that bright paper makes people happy; in fact, I did it to make sure I could keep the two “surveys” separate.

At the beginning of the event, I asked the students to spend two minutes writing about networking. It could have been their definition of networking or just words that come to mind; grammar and complete sentences not necessary. I then did the same thing at the end of the event.

I could have just looked through and summarized key trends from each sample, but I decided to get fancy, transcribe the text, and enter it into Wordle, a tool that generates word clouds.

Here’s the Pre-Workshop Wordle

Screen Shot 2014-02-11 at 3.18.09 PM.png

And the Post:

Screen Shot 2014-02-11 at 3.20.44 PM.png

While the results show that I focused on the importance of relationships, I don’t think I can claim that students gained a more in-depth understanding of networking.  What I did learn is that it seems like students already had a handle on the definition of networking, so perhaps I needed to assess their comfort level actually knowing how to network!

While this wasn’t the most successful assessment attempt, I do think that it can be great when you are trying to compare students’ knowledge of more difficult to assess topics (think professionalism, diversity, self-awareness).

Would you try it?

Read more of Desalina Allen’s blogs on assessment!

The Devil Does Wear Prada

Lakeisha MathewsLakeisha M. Mathews, Director, Career and Professional Development Center, University of Baltimore
Twitter: @RightResumes_CC
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/lakeishamathews/

One of my favorite movies is the Devil Wears Prada, where Meryl Streep (one of my favorite actresses) plays the role of Miranda Priestly, the editor of a popular fashion magazine. Costarring with Meryl is Anne Hathaway as Andrea Sachs, a frumpy assistant who has no interest in fashion. I like the movie for many reasons, for instance, there is great fashion, a peek at Paris Fashion Week and cameos of fashions’ top designers. However, my love of the movie runs deeper with an appreciation of the career development themes that are evident in the professional image evolution of Anne Hathaway’s character throughout the film.

Initially, Anne Hathaway’s character was resistant to the style culture she found herself in, denying that anything was wrong with her frumpy image as long as she produced good work. However, once she allowed her image to be upgraded by a colleague she realized having a professional image is a part of putting your best foot forward and impacts how others view you in the workplace.

Many of our students are in a need of what I like to call The Devil Does Wear Prada talk. No, I am not implying that they need to purchase designer clothes and become obsessed with their wardrobe. But, I do encourage students to consider their professional image as a part of the career development process. This can be a sensitive issue to bring up with students, nevertheless, it is essential and sets them up for a competitive advantage in a tough labor market. In my career coaching experience with both traditional and non-traditional students, I have had many The Devil Does Wear Prada talks with students including discussions around how to style hair, skirt length, appropriate make-up, faith-based ornaments, tattoos, etc. Each discussion is different and every student must develop an authentic image that makes them feel self-assured and comfortable. Awareness is the first step and includes:

1. Investing in a professional wardrobe that is appropriate to your industry and company;
2. Developing an awareness of what looks good on you and makes you feel confident;
3. Paying attention to the little things: clean nails, shaven beards, polished shoes, etc;
4. Finding a go-to store for purchasing an affordable professional wardrobe whether it’s Target, Banana Republic, or Macys;
5. Wearing a hairstyle that brings out your facial features and frames your face in a complimentary manner.