Facebook: The One Place Organic Is Not a Selling Point

Megan WollebenMegan Wolleben, Assistant Director, Career Development Center, Bucknell University
Twitter: @MeganWolleben LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/meganwolleben

Facebook Zero: Considering Life After the Demise of Organic Reach by Social@Ogilvy

When I first saw the above article on Twitter I favorited it; not because it was my favorite piece of news but because I wanted to keep my eye on it. It’s been in the back of my mind rattling around since and I was thankful for the reminder, and thoughts it provoked, when I saw a friend and colleague (the ever-awesome Shannon Kelly of UPenn) start it as a conversation in a LinkedIn group of which I am a member.

The news about the “end of organic reach,” made me feel a little better about myself. Until it was spoken aloud I was left wondering if it was just me. As our post reach numbers hit all-time lows I thought, “Was it something I said?” And while it’s always nice to know it’s not only you, the outcome is still not ideal. We all noticed the changes and probably, in some small way, knew (or feared) what it meant, what was coming.

As the article points out:

In 2012, Facebook famously restricted organic reach of content published from brand pages to about 16 percent. In December 2013, another round of changes reduced it even more.

But destination zero? The conversation on LinkedIn mentions the concern for smaller businesses and non-profits which touches on one of my major issues: Facebook treats all pages as the same. And by the same, I mean as big brands: GM, Coke, Nike – brands with BIG budgets and BIG agencies behind them. Regardless of what side of the table you are coming from, big business or career services, I think we should be upset about the fact that what “destination zero” essentially does is blocks your content to existing fans unless you pay. “Your Facebook Page’s Organic Reach Is About to Plummet,” article from Social Media Today raise a very poignant question: couldn’t Facebook somehow allow existing fans to be reached via organic means, and worked out a way that businesses pay to reach new fans? We all worked hard to get these fans. At my career center we paid for ads on Facebook to attract fans to our page. Now we are essential being forced to pay to communicate with existing fans, and any new ones, ad infinitum.

I keep asking myself, should we just leave Facebook? Or should we pony-up and pay for reach? When we created our Facebook page it was not driven by organic reach or ROI. It was about having a presence in a space where our students were (and still are) active. That is the same reason we hang up posters outside of the cafeteria. Facebook allowed our office a space for quick updates on an easy to navigate platform that students check frequently.

I found it so easy to jump in to using Facebook but I’m hesitant to jump out and I’m not sure why. If you asked me yesterday, in a fit of frustration, I would have said I wanted to give up and delete our page once and for all. Is anyone considering this? I know what’s pushing me out but I’m not sure I know what’s keeping me. What’s keeping you (and your career center) there?

 

Am I Mashed Up or Just Fried? A Journey Into Social Recruiting

Chris Carlson
Christopher Carlson, Senior Manager, Talent Acquisition, Booz Allen Hamilton
Twitter: @cciCarlson
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/ccicrc

Reading regular updates on corporate engagement and investment into social media suggests that it is becoming a critical piece of corporate recruiting strategies.  The influence of social recruiting and media on university recruiting continues to evolve.  Many traditional campus recruiting models are being challenged by new paradigms in means of communication.  Our team has been in the process of evolving our social recruiting strategies for university recruiting, and when asked to contribute to the NACE Blog, I thought it would be appropriate to develop a series of blogs designed to share more about my personal journey into social recruiting.

Let me start the series by sharing a personal perspective.  I hate to confess this, but I learned recruiting in a small office back in the day when recruiting was done by putting an advertisement in a local paper and that was pretty much our only strategy.  We opened the envelopes of those who applied and proceeded to review them, and put them into two piles—qualified and not-qualified.  I still remember counting the months and years of experience on each of the qualified resumes with a red pen for review by the hiring manager and the EEO officer. We thought 150 applicants was a lot.

Over the years, I recruited during the introduction of the Internet and job boards. I still am close with some recruiters who were in the chat room of the original OCC, which became Monster. We went from 150 applicants per  job posting to thousands. They came in from all over the world. Technical recruiting exploded, but it was still contained in the confines of job boards and postings. Throughout this whole period, some things remained constant in university recruiting—posting positions, career fairs, on-campus interviews, meeting professors, and student group meetings. Technology advanced a greater ease in posting as we didn’t have to mail a flyer anymore, but still nothing dramatic happened.

Fast forward to now…every student has a smart phone and/or a tablet. Career services staff leverage social media to keep students informed and even trained. There are apps like Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, and Vine that allow individuals to communicate instantly and to large numbers of people.  My head whirls sometimes just thinking about it all. Should I be mashing something so I can “mashup?” If I am on Twitter, am I twittering or tweeting, and why am I putting a hashtag in front of everything? Do I have to write in complete sentences?  Who are these people and why do they want to connect with me?

Our team met just over a year ago to review the changing landscape on campuses and within our business. We reviewed our resources, outreach, tools, and historical metrics.  We discussed our challenges and opportunities. We then started to realize that we needed to embrace a remote, social recruiting strategy. We started down that path and are still moving in that direction. Over the coming months I am going to discuss the transition from traditional campus recruiting to embracing this “brave new world.” I will be discussing processes, lessons learned, and best practices.

In true social media fashion, I encourage you to share your stories with me as well. We can mashup together, and I hope you will continue to follow me down my #journey. I will also be presenting at #NACE14 on this topic in more detail.

Everyone Is a Recruiter, best practices on establishing a social recruiting approach that takes into account both internal and external tools and audiences, will be presented by Christopher Carlson and Courtenay Verret, Talent Acquisition Program Associate, American Red Cross.

The One Thing Underlying Really Good Career Advice

kevin grubbNACE Ambassador Kevin Grubb
Assistant Director at Villanova University’s Career Center.
Twitter: @kevincgrubb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevingrubb
Blog: “social @ edu”.

How many times during any given year do you say something like the following statements?

  • “At the career fair, make the first move and introduce yourself to the company representatives with a smile and strong handshake.”
  • “It’s a good idea to create and manage a great social media presence online: have you made a LinkedIn profile yet?”
  • “Effective networking is one of the most essential elements to a successful job search. You have to put yourself out there.”

The answer is probably “a zillion.”

These pieces of career advice are frequently mentioned around the web and in career centers across the country. For good reason, too—they’re all important messages for any job seeker to hear. In 2013, I started paying attention to them more, and specifically, the resistance felt from the recipients of this advice. What was it that made some people quick to act on these words and others hesitant about it?

There was one theme that struck me most: courage. Courage underlies these pieces of advice. It’s taking action on something even when facing the fear of it.

Take the student whom you know is top notch on paper. You’ve seen her resume: she’s academically stellar with noteworthy experiences in and out of the classroom. But, she’s not one to generate a conversation. Simply advising her to introduce herself to an employer at a career fair might not work. She might need not only the “how to” of proper introductions, but also some time spent building the courage to do it.

Or, how about the student who is interested in journalism? One great piece of advice for him might be to start a blog. Not only would this give him a venue to practice his work, it would also give him the opportunity to invite others to read it. Perhaps it could turn into a portfolio of writing samples for future job applications. Beyond the instructions for setting up a blog and tips on effective posts, it may take some courage building to help him get comfortable with the idea of putting his work out there.

When I’m talking with someone who’s hesitant about following these pieces of advice, I ask them to identify the cause of their nervousness. Once a fear is named, we can create a plan to address it together. Maybe it’s writing a few “blog posts” and e-mailing them only to close family and friends to get experience hearing feedback. It could be setting the goal of initiating one in person introduction per week, even among peers on campus, until things feel comfortable. Experiencing a few small wins can build the momentum to something bigger.

NACE blog readers, what are your thoughts on courage in career conversations?

New Millennial Attitudes on Technology and Their Future

kevin grubbA post by NACE Ambassador Kevin Grubb
Assistant Director at Villanova University’s Career Center.
Twitter: @kevincgrubb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevingrubb
Blog: “social @ edu”.

Working in the field of college career services and college recruiting fascinates me. There are many reasons why, but one of the foremost is that speaking with college students keeps me on my toes. With every new class comes a new set of trends to consider.

The "New Millennials"

The “New Millennials” are the next to enter higher education. What trends will they bring with them?

For the past several years and in the next several to come, many of the trends center around Millennials. Viacom, parent company of MTV, VH1, Comedy Central and more, recently released some insightful information about the “New Millennials” – the younger set of Millennials, now ages 13-17. As many of them are the college students of tomorrow, I considered reading this as future-minded professional development for myself. Here are my five most interesting facts from the report:

  1. A large majority of New Millennials are worried that the economy of today will have a negative impact on their future. I see anxiety about getting a job in the “real world” in current students frequently, and this finding makes me wonder what concerns and emotions New Millennials will bring to the table.
  2. The percentage of New Millennials who agree that “My parents are like a best friend to me” is up 10 percent (now to 68 percent) since 2010. I am reminded instantly of the “Bring Your Parents to Work” day idea discussed already on the NACE blog.
  3. 70 percent of New Millennials report that “I learn how to do things on YouTube” or “I go to YouTube for DIY videos.” Confession: YouTube helped me learn how to tie a necktie. So, maybe this goes for us “old Millennials,” too. The finding also makes me glad we’ve already been working on our YouTube presence in our office.
  4. 80 percent of New Millennials say that “Sometimes I just need to unplug and enjoy the simple things.” This just makes me happy. I have a group of Millennial friends that I get together with on Sundays for breakfast. All of us are in education, whether primary, secondary, or higher, and we often talk about how we hope students will break from technology from time to time. I hope this continues.
  5. A key finding of the report is that New Millennials are increasingly finding private ways to share things on social media. On the flip side, I read recently that Facebook is now requiring all users to be available in a Facebook search. I hear discontent with Facebook often from students and friends. Will this shift be another notch against the world’s largest social network?

NACE blog readers, what’s your take on Millennials and trends in our work?

Image credit: flickr.com

Twitter for Job Search: Be the Smartest Candidate in the Room

20111112_weinberg-048-Edit-web[1]

A post by NACE Guest Blogger, Pamela Weinberg
Website: www.pamelaweinberg.com
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/pamelaweinberg/
Twitter: @pamelaweinberg

For most job seekers LinkedIn is the “go-to” social media site. (I will talk about LinkedIn in another post.) I have been encouraging students lately to take to Twitter to get the most up-to-date information about the companies and industries they are interested in and to build their personal brands.

Here are some tips you can share with students about using Twitter for the job search:

  • Follow companies where you would like to work. You will have real time information on hiring, expansion, and new product development. And when the time comes for an interview, you will be completely up-to-date on company happenings.
  • Follow industry experts. Not sure who they are? Check out www.listorious.com to see who the top tweeters are in each industry.
  • Retweet relevant posts. Your twitter posts should reflect your career interests and aspirations. A student interested in a marketing position should follow and repost interesting and topical articles about marketing.
  • Search for jobs: Websites such as www.twitjobsearch.com list many positions only found through Twitter. Why? Because employers want to hire those who are social media savvy.
  • Connect Directly: Someone that you follow say something interesting and you want to comment? Go right ahead! It’s a great way to develop relationships with experts in your chosen field. Anyone on Twitter can be sent a direct message by placing the @ before their Twitter handle in the message box.

Want to get started? Tweet me at @PamelaWeinberg!

The Importance of Social Media and Measuring ROI in Career Services Practices

Heather TranenA post by Guest Blogger, Heather Tranen
Associate Director, Global Communications & Strategic Outreach, NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development
Twitter: @htranen
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/heathertranen

 

 

Social media continues to grow in scope and power. There are so many platforms out there, and our students are all over them. To this generation, it’s almost as if things don’t actually happen unless they are filming, photographing, tweeting or status updating it.Screen Shot 2013-09-18 at 7.40.15 PM.png

Gen Y overshares and hyperconsumes content in the online space. They feel like things aren’t actually happening unless it’s happening on social media.

“They take technology for granted. They live through social media. They want the world their way, and they want it now.” – Forbs on Gen Y

As career services professionals, we need to navigate our communication strategies to both speak their language, and teach them to become fluent in the language of the professional world. Through social media, we can engage students in the space they are comfortable with, and then lure them into our office to connect to the tangible resources they need to be successful after college – a bait and switch of sorts.

These days, most understand that social media is here to stay. However, whether or not there is value in it remains questionable by many. Therefore, measuring ROI is crucial. Knowing the difference between vanity and actionable metrics is extremely important!

Vanity Metrics: It’s always nice to have a large following and fans to make us feel super important and liked. These vanity metrics are often how supervisors judge whether we are doing a good job. Yes, these are important. However, who are these individuals following or liking us? Are they strangers, or actually connections who are engaging and utilizing our resources?

Actionable Metrics: What really matters is whether our campaign translated into “performance” outcomes. Who retweeted us, who became more aware of our resources and came to the office to utilize them? These are the questions we should all ask when engaging with students in the social media space.

Metrics and ROI are becoming increasingly important in higher education.  I recommend looking at platforms like Hootsuite, Twitonomy, Klout, and Facebook admin pages to help you gather a valuable measurement of your engagement in the online space. Correlating the timing of your social media messaging with spikes in attendance or counseling requests also serves as a more abstract way of showing the impact of your social media practices, and proving you are social media all-stars!

Strategies to Help Students Get the Most from Their LinkedIn Experience

Espie SantiagoEspie Santiago, NACE Guest Blogger, is an assistant director of career counseling at the Stanford University Career Development Center
Twitter: @espie_s
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/espiesantiagoOn Friday, August 23, my colleague Bev Principal and I will be conducting a session on “Strategies to Help Students Get the Most from Their LinkedIn Experience.” As career services professionals and employers, we all know that LinkedIn is a mandatory tool in today’s job market, but it can be challenging to convince students of its value without structured programs. It’s even more challenging when faculty and academic departments on your college campus don’t use LinkedIn themselves, and therefore don’t support or encourage students to use it. We’re excited to share with you how we, at the Stanford University Career Development Center, were able to successfully grow our LinkedIn program amongst students, faculty and staff, thereby helping students get the most from their LinkedIn experience. Ours is one such success story, but we’re also anxious to hear anecdotes from others on the do’s and don’ts of building social media programs at your respective organizations.

I am really looking forward to meeting fellow social media enthusiasts throughout #NACESocial!

NACE Social Media Mashup:
Pre-Event Online Networking

Espie SantiagoEspie Santiago, NACE Guest Blogger, is an assistant director of career counseling at the Stanford University Career Development Center
Twitter: @espie_s
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/espiesantiago




Today I was fortunate to have participated in NACE’s Social Media Pre-Event, which was a live virtual speed-networking session. Working in university career services over the years, I’ve definitely overdosed on my share of in-person speed-networking events, but this was the first time I’ve ever joined one online. And boy did I enjoy using this type of technology to get connected to Mashup attendees prior to #NACESocial this Thursday and Friday – what a great way to engage some of us before the event even begins! Hosted by Brazen Careerist, I was able to easily chat with a handful of career services professionals and employers to learn about their specific interests in using social media today. I look forward to continuing our conversations in person at the Mashup. Special thanks to those I chatted with including Diana Wong, Dawn Carter, Glen Fowler, Alice Camuti and Ashley Hoffman.

Social Media Bridges the Gap in Communication and Engages Constituents in NYU Wasserman Center’s Award-winning #iamlimitless campaign

Heather TranenA post by Guest Blogger, Heather Tranen
Associate Director, Global Communications & Strategic Outreach, NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development
Twitter: @htranen
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/heathertranen

 

What do President Obama, Spike Lee, Macy’s College Recruiting, and Italy have in common? They were all an integral part of NYU Wasserman Center’s  NACE Innovation Excellence Award-winning#iamlimitless global social media student engagement campaign (don’t try saying that ten times fast).

photo (3).jpg

We were all excited about our big win at the awards ceremony, but I was still nervous about people actually showing up to the presentation the following day. I figured maybe 30 people would show up – half of which would hail from our own institution. When the room filled up and people were lined up outside of the door, I thought maybe everyone would leave once they realized Justin Bieber wasn’t performing.

A few awkward jokes and flubbed video showing later, the crowd still remained to hear myself and Sneh share NYU’s #iamlimitless campaign. No pressure, right?

Nerves aside, it was incredibly exciting to see so many people interested in what our campaign offered students and other constituents. This blog post serves to provide an overview of the campaign and share the resources and best practices you can adopt to create a campaign of your own.

What is #iamlimitless?

Sneh asked the audience.

“I am limitless. Say it out loud. It Feels good, right?”

And it does. #iamlimitless empowers students to tell their career story to their peers through the powerful tool of social media.

Through the #iamlimitless campaign, the Wasserman Center saw a drastic increase in student and employer engagement. Our previous, primarily email and print-centric campaigns left a large portion of the Gen Y student population disconnected from career events and services relevant to their needs. The #iamlimitless campaign bridged the communication gap through a targeted, incentive based initiative. The campaign brought to life the Wasserman’s “limitless” opportunities motto, encouraged students across the globe to tell their global career stories, and morphed the intimidating notion of career development into a friendly, accessible entity. Additionally, the campaign served as a brand building opportunity for employers and local businesses. Organizations ranging from Macy’s to small cafes in the Greenwich Village area sponsored our raffle prizes. At the end of each week of the fall semester, those who   used  #iamlimitless to share their career stories across social platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram were entered into a raffle and winners were announced via Twitter and Facebook.

Screen Shot 2013-06-07 at 2.20.00 PM.pngScreen Shot 2013-06-07 at 2.18.07 PM.pngScreen Shot 2013-06-07 at 2.43.23 PM.png

Why Social Media?

There are so many platforms out there, and our students are all over them. To this generation, it’s almost as if things don’t actually happen unless they are filming, photographing, tweeting or status updating it. Gen Y overshares and hyperconsumes content in the online space.

“They take technology for granted. They live through social media. They want the world their way, and they want it now.” – Forbs on Gen Y

As professionals we need to navigate our communication strategies to both speak their language, and teach them the language of the professional world. The #iamlimitless campaign served as a way to engage students in the space they are comfortable with, and then lure them into our office to connect to the tangible resources they need to be successful after college – a bait and switch of sorts.

ROI: Vanity vs. Actionable Metrics

Vanity Metrics: It’s always nice to have a large following and fans to make us feel super important and liked. These vanity metrics are often how supervisors judge whether we are doing a good job. Yes, these are important. However, who are these individuals following or liking us? Are they strangers, or actually connections who are engaging and utilizing our resources?

Actionable Metrics: What really matters is whether our campaign translated into “performance” outcomes. Who retweeted us, who became more aware of our resources and came to the office to utilize them? These are the questions we should all ask when engaging with students in the social media space.

Did it work? You be the judge!

#iamlimitless was used 133% times more than the second highest hashtag used by the Wasserman Center

#iamlimitless was cited over 100 times across the Wasserman Center’s social media platforms

@NYUWasserman was mentioned 150% times more in the campaign launch month of September 2012

@NYUWasserman’s Klout score increased by 10 points!

Participation in events like our career fair and applications for our Funded Internship Award increased exponentially.

We caught the attention of the Washington Square News and an article in support of the campaign was published and disseminated to its 100k subscribers.

NEXT for NYU Wasserman Center and #iamlimitless

The Wasserman Center will launch it’s #iamlimitless Socializer campaign this fall. It will further engage a broader audience by incentivizing students who get the most likes, repins, and retweets on posts that connect their peers to the Wasserman Center’s resources. Stay tuned for the results of it!

DIY Social Media Campaigning

Start Small:  Don’t feel like you need to throw a rager for your first social media party. Think about starting small with a one-time incentive to complement an individual event.

Operate on One Platform: Use one established platform that you are comfortable with before you expand to a multi-platform approach. Our first experience with a campaign was with a Macy’s event hosted using Foursquare specials. Those who checked in during the time of the event were entered into a raffle to win prizes donated by Macy’s.

Build Buzz and Engage All Constituents: Build buzz both online leading up to the launch of your campaign, but also in person by engaging all constituents. We engaged student affairs offices, faculty, alumni and local organizations to help support the campaign.

Provide  Affordable: Incentives: You also don’t have to break the bank. Incentives don’t need to be expensive. Students love swag, but the majority of our incentives were provided by employer sponsorships, or members of the NYU surrounding businesess. You can even think of non-monetary incentives like an informational interview with one of your employer partners.

Track Impact: Using your Facebook page’s admin metrics, Hootsuite ow.ly clicks, Twitonomy metrics, and Klout score are just a few ways to see what’s working, what needs tweaking, and how effectively your office is engaging with your constituents.

Thanks again to everyone who supported the #iamlimitless campaign, and who came to our presentation and asked insightful questions. Twitter was also ablaze with #iamlimitless chatter. You can check out our Storify for more on what #NACE13 folks had to say about the #iamlimitless presentation! NACE 2013 was such an awesome experience and we can’t wait to see what’s in store for next year’s conference! If anyone is interested in continuing the social media conversation, hit me up on Twitter at @HTranen!

#NACE13: Let the Countdown Begin

Sarah MartinA post by Guest Blogger, Sarah Martin, College Relations and Social Media Recruiter, Garmin International

Twitter: @workatgarmin

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/SarahMartin1

#NACE13. My first NACE conference! I’ve been looking forward to this event for months and am so honored to participate as a guest blogger. My background? I’ve been recruiting for 9 years, the last 3 of which have been exclusively college recruitment at Garmin International. A year ago we started incorporating social media into our company recruitment efforts, which has been an extremely interesting and educational adventure. I’m so thankful to have a mentor who has paved the way for social media within Garmin! Our current recruitment efforts, with regards to social media, are primarily focused on Twitter (@workatgarmin). There are so many avenues to reach potential candidates, we are continually evaluating the most strategic and effective ways to connect with our target audience.

It’s amazing to think about how much my role as a recruiter has changed over the last (almost) decade. When I started recruiting, the company I worked for (a progressive healthcare system) had paper applications. We filled our openings by attending career fairs and other recruitment events. Today at Garmin (an innovative technology company), we accept online applications, attend virtual career fairs, host a variety of recruitment events, and are inserting ourselves into the ever changing world of social media as it relates to recruitment. One thing that hasn’t changed? The value of networking. I look forward to meeting a variety of individuals at #NACE13: Career Services Representatives, College Recruiters, and other industry experts.

There are so many great workshops to attend, I’m not sure if I will be able to fit everything in. I’m lucky that a co-worker of mine is also attending, so we can tag team. Now comes the time to get strategic and prioritize! One workshop at the top of my list is “Social Media and College Recruits: Bring an “A Game.” The title alone speaks my language, and a bonus is that the presenter is an expert on this topic. Sign me up!

I’m happy to share the information I learn at #NACE13. Please stay tuned, because I will be blogging throughout the course of the conference, and I’m open to any questions/feedback.