Am I Mashed Up or Just Fried? A Journey Into Social Recruiting With Puppies (Part VI):

Chris Carlson

Christopher Carlson, Senior Manager, Talent Acquisition, Booz Allen Hamilton
Twitter: @cciCarlson
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/ccicrc
Blogs from Christopher Carlson

About two weeks ago, I had the chance to attend a social media/recruiting conference in New York City. It was a really great opportunity to learn about best practices in social recruiting from some real industry leaders. While in New York, I had the chance to visit the MoMA as well. If you have never been, it is really a wonderful museum full of amazing art. It got me thinking about something I wrote on my last blog, a quote from Tammy Garmey from TMP “Content is King but Context Rules.”

Our digital content is very much like art in many ways, in that the context in which we see the art can influence our interpretations. We have the chance to present our ideas and messages in so many different ways to reach a wide variety of audiences and tastes. It is always the context in which we view the art that dictates our appreciation.

Walking through the museum looking at amazing pieces by some of my favorite artists, I also noted that many people were using headsets to learn about the pieces and the artists—common in most museums. Some individuals were led by docents on official tours. Still others were outside listening to a live concert that MoMA had in their courtyard—experience art through music. Not only did MoMA expose people to the art works, they provided multiple ways to reach their audience. At this point, you may be saying, “so what is your point Chris?” Good question…

Let’s fast forward to a call with some 20+ representatives from a variety of companies and from the Jobs Accommodations Network (JANworks.org). On this call, we talked about how to make our recruiting content accessible to everyone including individuals with disabilities or differing abilities. We tried to focus the effort on organically created content developed by our employees. Most of the companies represented were already leaders in hiring individuals with disabilities, and we wanted to further enhance our outreach via social media.

A few key points resulting from the call included:

  • Use multiple channels to share your message: Not every social media tool has built-in accessibility and it is important that you don’t use just one to reach your audience. Just like the MoMA, consider options for your audience.
  • Make content accessible at the point of creation: Look for ways to cascade information about how to make content accessible to your employees so that as they create content it will be accessible. By doing so, it will better convey the real meaning and not lose perspective after someone else tries to make it accessible.
  • Include positive images of individuals with disabilities in your content: One thought is to partner with relevant ERGs or to work closely with your marketing team to make sure you have those positive images so that individuals will be drawn to you.
  • Make it routine: When building PowerPoint presentations or videos, always use built-in accessibility tools whether you need to do so or not. Having people make this part of their everyday will ensure that more content is accessible and easier to create.

For me, the discussion around content and making it accessible reminded me of one of the pieces in the MoMA. The piece was entitled “Still Life With Three Puppies.” Our messaging is like that painting. You can paint still life but it becomes so much more enriching and engaging when we include puppies. Find ways to incorporate varieties of media into your messaging such as captions into your videos or word descriptions of your photos. By doing so, more people will be drawn to your message just like we are drawn to the puppies.

There were definitely some other insights into specific tools that you can use and I will be happy to share those with you if you reach me. You can also reach to JAN at www.askjan.org. They are a great resource.

Bring More Than Just Jobs to Campus This Fall

Smedstad-HeadshotShannon Smedstad, Employment Brand Director, Global Communications & Engagement Team, CEB
Twitter: @shannonsmedstad
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/shannonsmedstad
Blogs from Shannon Smedstad.

When a company’s core message on campus is simply “WE’RE HIRING,” it can get lost amidst the other noise.  Students may have a difficult time differentiating jobs at one company over jobs at another. This is particularly true if your organization is new to campus, in a highly competitive industry, or relatively unknown.

According to the CEB 2014 Employment Branding Effectiveness Survey, millennials spend more than 50 percent less time than other generations researching organizations before they decide to apply. On average, millennials spent 12.4 hours learning about employers during their most recent job search, whereas other generations averaged 25.9 hours. Now more than ever, employers must think of innovative and “consultative” ways to increase their employer brand awareness to reach this highly sought after demographic.

One way to stand out, while continuing to add value to your overall campus relationships, is to do more than just promote jobs. You’ll also have to do more than just promote your company. Here are several ideas to brainstorm with your teams as you begin your fall planning:

Scholarships and Award Programs

What college student couldn’t use a little extra cash for school? Scholarships and other monetary awards—offered directly to target universities, via student organization partnerships, or through online submission platforms—are a great way to build brand awareness in a more altruistic way.

For example, if your company hires engineering majors, consider offering scholarships to second- and third-year students. This will allow you to identify engineering talent early and learn more about them, while also positioning your organization as a place that gives back.

Real Life Projects and Case Competitions

Years ago, my previous employer partnered with a professor at Penn State on a semester-long capstone project for one of his classes. We sponsored a team of five incredibly bright students as they worked through a real-world IT issue affecting our business. At the end of the semester, the CIO traveled with me to campus to listen to the group’s presentation. He was so impressed by the students that he wanted to make offers on the spot!

This is just one example of how companies can partner with universities to bring value to students’ academic experiences. It was a great way to get executive buy-in for future partnerships and to engage top university talent on a more consultative level.

Internships and Externships

Right now, many companies are in the throes of summer internship programs. The best companies know the value of providing meaningful work experiences to students. Executing a 10-week internship requires time, effort and resources, as well as people with a passion for developing talent. But what happens when summer is over and students are back on campus? By offering a week-long externship during breaks, organizations can continue to foster relationships and stay top-of-mind with key universities, pipeline candidates, and student organizations.

Purposeful Offerings With Business Outcomes

Building up additional programs on top of your existing campus strategy takes a lot of time and effort. Not only are talent acquisition teams expected to fill 50, 100, or 1,000 entry-level job openings, they are now being asked to commit to developing, marketing, administering, and measuring programs. This can be overwhelming to some campus recruiters, and the programs that should be adding value become just one more box to check.

Before rolling out a new program or revamping an existing one, find a champion—someone who’s excited about owning the program and driving results. A well thought-out initiative that is superbly executed can translate into real business outcomes, including:

•    Higher participation in on-campus events
•    Greater brand awareness at tier-one schools
•    Uptick in website traffic and social media engagement
•    Increased internship and/or full-time job applications
•    Increase in quality of hire due to early identification and relationship building

If your organization does not have the resources for add-on programs, another key way to attract students is through the interactions they have with your recruiters and hiring managers. Encourage your teams to take a more consultative approach to their recruiting or interviewing styles, by seeking to build relationships and trust, listen carefully, and foster open lines of communication.

Instead of funneling candidates through the hiring process like a widget on a conveyor belt, teach recruiters to focus on building relationships and creating positive candidate experiences. The CEB survey also states that millennials receive 12.5 percent more offers than other generations, so dedicating extra attention to the candidate experience is likely to help organizations improve their offer to acceptance conversion rates of millennial candidates.

Will your organization take more than just jobs to campus this fall? How are your teams taking a more consultative approach to hiring millennials? Share your insights below.

You’ll find more information on best practices in recruiting on NACEWeb.

Lessons Learned at #NACE14

ongDavid Ong, Director, Corporate Recruiting, Maximus, Inc.
Twitter: @dtong2565
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/dave-ong/0/604/513

It’s been two weeks since the 2014 NACE Conference, and I’ve finally recovered from the profound lack of sleep that I experienced in San Antonio. (For those of you that weren’t there, the non-stop networking combined with the excitement in the city from the Spurs NBA title win turned our hotel complex into a never-ending celebration chamber!)

With my batteries now re-charged, here are a few general observations from the conference:

1) Our profession is in a very dynamic phase—Is it just me, or was anyone else just in awe of how many critical issues and trends are hitting simultaneously. From First Destinations to OFCCP to Big Data to STEM Education……It’s clear that the game is changing big time! The conference was the perfect opportunity to exchange ideas with my peers, my customers, and our affiliate members.

2) Our future looks bright—If the conference first-time attendee session was any indication, we’re in great hands. The new attendees seemed so highly engaged, inquisitive, and truly excited about being NACE members and they wanted to know how to get more involved, which bodes well for all of our members. Every year this group gets bigger. Case in point: We typically split the newcomers into groups of about 15 people, and we assign past or present NACE board members to facilitate discussion. To our shock, we actually ran short on NACE board representatives! (Kudos to our terrific conference co-chairs Maura Quinn from Liberty Mutual and Fred Burke from Baruch College for stepping in to facilitate!)

3) We have some great leaders at NACE—How can anyone not be impressed by the performance of our fearless leader, Dan Black of EY? The guy attended almost every organized event, chatted with virtually everyone he met, enlightened (and entertained) us with his “Early Show” interviews of NACE award winners. He threw down the ultimate challenge to our members with a new member outreach proposal. He also did a great job with the passing of the torch to President Sam Ratcliffe of VMI, who did a wonderful job of welcoming first-time attendees and gave us an enlightening glimpse into the college recruiting future. Like many of you, I’m really psyched to see what Sam has in store for all of us now that he’s the president!

One last comment….There is real power in blogging—I’ve got to be honest….When the folks at NACE asked me to consider writing this blog, I was a little hesitant. Questions like “What am I going to write about?” “Will anybody read it?” and “If they read it, will they fall asleep?” all entered into my head. Thankfully, the NACE conference changed my view of blogging after I had several encounters with attendees who recognized me from the blog photo (Note to self: Pick up a gift for our company photographer.) and asked to take a selfie with them, which promptly got posted on social media outlets (Other note to self: Learn to take selfies from above not below.) I heard from other NACE bloggers that they had similar experiences to mine, so a huge thanks to those of you that took the time to let us know that you’re enjoying this latest communications outlet from NACE!

That’s it for now….Next NACE stop for me: the Summer of 2014 Board of Directors meeting in Boston.

You’ll find a list of NACE’s Board of Directors on NACEWeb. If you’re interested in becoming a member of the NACE Blog Team, contact Claudia Allen.

Top Companies Hire ‘Blindly Applying’ Interns

Smedstad-HeadshotShannon Smedstad, CEB Employment Brand Director, Global Communications & Engagement Team
Twitter: @shannonsmedstad
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/shannonsmedstad

Eighteen cities. Eighteen companies. Eighteen interns about to embark on the internship adventure of a lifetime. And, when students initially applied, they had no idea of where in the world they would end up. That’s just one aspect of BlindApplying.com that makes it exciting!blind applying

In its inaugural year, the Blind Applying project received a whopping 10,000 applications primarily from students across Europe and Asia. Each student submitted just one application that was then considered by participating companies.

Think of it as the NFL draft of the internship world. College students who apply anticipate a call from any one of 18 top European companies, including Accenture, Bayer, Daimler, BASF, EY, Merck, and Bertelsmann.

Stats on Blind Applying

  • Nearly 50 percent of students had business-related degrees, followed by approximately 23 percent from engineering programs.
  • The most represented applicant countries included Germany, France, Portugal, Italy, India, and the UK.
  • 56 percent of students heard about the program from Facebook.
  • There was an approximate 50/50 split between male and female applicants.

Changing the Lives of Students

As if interning in Paris, Tokyo, Munich, or Sydney wasn’t enough! The lucky 18 interns—who began their paid internships this summer—each receive sponsorship for travel and housing costs. Students are also encouraged to share their internship adventures via their individual Blind Applying blogs.

It’s Happening Again in 2015

When surveyed, the top two reasons so many students participated were the convenience of applying to 18 opportunities using just one CV submission, and a chance to go global. And with more than 80 percent of applicants indicating that they would apply again if offered the chance … it’s on again for next summer! 

Who is Behind Blind Apply?

Driving this project is the Entrypark team of the global research firm Potentialpark, based in Stockholm, Sweden, and the HR community has already taken notice of the team’s innovative work. Blind Applying has received the HR Excellence Award and the Trendence Employer Branding Award.

The team plans to ramp up the program next year. The goal is to offer 30 unique internship opportunities with 30 top companies.

Are U.S. Companies Ready to Hire?

From a workflow process, students apply online and their CVs are reviewed. If their background is a suitable fit, CVs are presented to participating companies. Once a company has selected their top candidates, interviews are conducted. It’s not until the interview phase that students know who’s considering them.

What do you think? Would your company consider participating in something like this? If you’re interested in learning more, please contact Bjorn Wigeman.

 

Am I Mashed-Up or Just Fried: A Journey Into Social Recruiting (Part 5)

Chris Carlson

Christopher Carlson, Senior Manager, Talent Acquisition, Booz Allen Hamilton
Twitter: @cciCarlson
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/ccicrc
Blogs from Christopher Carlson

About two months ago now, our team had our annual Spring Strategy Session. During this session, we reviewed data, as we always do, and started to think about 2014-2015 activities.  However, this year was unique because we invited our digital marketing team, our recruiting marketing team, and our learning and development team to join us.

It was a great!   We did a deep-dive on designing our approach to social recruiting through every stage from “awareness” to “conversion” for both the general audience and the targeted audience.  We became more aware of how to reach and influence candidates. We looked more closely at how we leverage each category of recruitment marketing—paid, owned, and earned.

Several key initiatives resulted from that session across each of those categories.  One of the most consuming of which is content development.  How do we ensure compelling content for those we are recruiting for short-term demand and those we want to engage for future demand? We had a few a-ha moments for sure and thought we had covered a lot of ground.  My head stopped spinning as much as it had in the past.

Then came #NACE14, right on the heels of our session.  BAM! My head started spinning again.  There were several sessions that really provided additional insights into customizing digital content to specific audiences. In addition, there were a few sessions that added to my playlist of words that are sure to be used by my team as part of new drinking games. Of special note would be two specific sessions (don’t worry, I will not plug my own) that I found of great interest that helped me understand more about content and how it can drive recruiting.

“Content is king, but context rules” was not only a great quote from Tammy Garmey from TMP in the Candidate Experience 3.XO session, but became my personal battle cry since leaving #NACE14. In the session she co-presented with Joe Howell from EMC2, they discussed how EMCbuilt a personalized digital content delivery experience for candidates. They showcased the technology platform they leveraged that would sort through the vast amount of content available and present what would be meaningful to a specific candidate.  The technology leverages information about the candidate and suggests content.  Big data and advanced analytics and all sorts of concepts come into play.

Whether your realize it or not, you and I are already seeing this approach applied to us every time we open our browsers or log onto a social media tool.  There is an  advertisement—on your screen probably right now—that someone thinks will be of interest to you based on your online behaviors, cookies, and other key data.   This workshop really brought it home to me that it is so critical to think about how you manage your content and more importantly how you deliver that content in a personalized way. We need to think about attracting the computer science major differently from the history major, just like we would on campus in person. Again, in social recruiting, one size does not fit all.

One of the other great sessions focused on gamification, my new favorite word. It was a SmartTalk given by Danelle DiLibero of RMS. She walked us through how RMS partnered with the developer of a very popular online game that had a direct correlation to their business. They embedded key messaging into the game that would provide real insight into the type of work that RMS does, as well as links to their careers site. Their efforts supported their culture of innovation and provided a vehicle for their employee value proposition. I can definitely see the benefit of this approach. Our team has had greater success with supporting competitions than we have at career fairs. My head is still swirling with the possibilities as our firm is about problem solving for our clients and we look for people who have a passion for solving problems.

It is going to be a fun year as we continue to evolve and formalize our approach to social recruiting, especially after #NACE14 and I will continue to share stories of our progress. On the day I wrote this blog, my Yahoo horoscope confirmed that it is going to be fun: “It’s a great day to try big, crazy ideas—even if they seem too big or crazy to work out. Consider it a day of experimentation and you are sure to learn some new, valuable things.”   Look out y’all it might get a little crazy!

This is the fifth in a series of blog about using social media in recruiting.

What Happened in Vegas…Didn’t Stay in Vegas

ongDavid Ong, Director, Corporate Recruiting, Maximus, Inc.
Twitter: @dtong2565
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/dave-ong/0/604/513

So it’s official, I’m now a NACE blogger! For those who don’t know me, I manage corporate and campus recruiting activities for MAXIMUS, a professional services firm in Reston, Virginia. I’ve also been a long-time NACE member (for nearly 15 years). After serving on the Board of Directors from 2011-2013, I will soon be the new Vice President, Employer, starting this July.

As I prepare for these new responsibilities (which you’ll be hearing about in the coming months if you follow this blog), I find myself occasionally reminiscing about my early (aka, clueless) years as a NACE member. So join me for a trip down memory lane to my first official NACE event—the 2001 Conference in Las Vegas—and how it impacted my career.

If you’re a newer member, you might not be aware that up until 2001, the NACE conference was an every-three-years event. Thankfully, the NACE leadership team had the strategic vision to change it to an annual conference (more on a couple of these leaders later).

So just how did these three-days in Vegas change the course of my career?

I established new relationships. Back then, I had just finished my first year of recruiting for Citigroup in NYC, and was busy building relationships with several new schools from which I’d never recruited. One of those schools was New York University, whose career center was headed by Trudy Steinfeld (#nyuwasserboss). To get to know her team a little better, I invited Trudy and her staff to join my team for a “refreshment break” on the first afternoon of the trip.

Obviously, we spent a good deal of our time talking about recruiting initiatives, but we also veered off to more social conversations where we immediately hit it off. That first conversation not only established a connection between my employer and NYU, but also created the beginnings of an invaluable friendship. Today, I can count on Trudy for guidance and advice (and the occasional refreshment break).

I met NACE leaders. This conference was my first exposure to the NACE leadership team. As (lady) luck would have it, I met then-NACE President, Kathy Sims from UCLA right after the opening session. She was so welcoming to me, a relatively new member of NACE. [On a side note, having served on the Board of Directors, I now know the President has a crazy conference schedule, so the time she took to get to know me is even more impressive.]

Kathy asked about my background, my goals for the conference, and when I was going to start recruiting at UCLA (naturally)! And, being a great leader that she is, she asked me if I was interested in becoming more involved with NACE. Flash forward 10 years and Kathy was one of my nominators for the Board of Directors and provided me with a ton of advice and encouragement when I decided to run for Vice President. You may be aware that Kathy has announced her retirement from UCLA, so I have many bittersweet feelings as I write this.

I experienced a range of emotions. I remember the gamut of feelings running through me from the start of the opening session all the way to the end of the conference. Nervousness because I didn’t know many other attendees. Confusion over what sessions to attend. Frustration at not being able to remember the names of everyone I met. Awe of all the learning opportunities. Appreciation for the generosity of my peers as they shared their knowledge. And that was all okay because I got so much out of the experience.

Fortunately that year, what happened in Vegas didn’t stay in Vegas. The networking that took place led to relationships that lasted well beyond the initial three-day conference. So whether you are attending this year’s conference for the first time (or second or third or fourth, for that matter), I hope that you will make the most of your experience. Track me down, tweet me at the conference, or just stop to say hello. If you can’t attend this year, start thinking about next year—trust me, it will be one of the best decisions you’ll ever make!

NACE14 attendees! Register for any of five free webinars based on popular workshops at the conference.