Career Fairs and How to be a ‘Match’

BlessVaiBless Vaidian, Pace University Career Services and Founder, Career Transitions Guide
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/blessvaidian
Twitter: https://twitter.com/BlessCareers
Blog: http://careertransitionsguide.com

 

With on-campus recruitment and career fairs in full swing, Bless Vaidian offers advice and insight to share with students.

Career fairs showcase match making between employers and job seekers. Numerous screening interviews take place under one roof and in under a few hours. If a student is not a fit, he or she will not be selected by the recruiter for the next round. Only those that “match” proceed.

College campuses are an ideal place to find job and internship fairs. I have worked on and managed career fairs over the years. Those students that are serious about getting a job or internship need to follow this advice: 

Prep You cannot walk into a career fair and wing it if you are serious about finding employment. Just as research is key to interview success, it’s also crucial for the fair. Find out ahead of time what organizations will be attending. Then check out the websites of your target companies, view their job postings, read their latest articles/tweets, and find out if you know anyone in your extended circle that works there. Saying you will “take anything,” shows you are not prepared. And, you will wind up with nothing.

Pre-Screening Recruiters at job and internship fairs have two piles of resumes. Your goal is to make it to the pile that passes the recruiter’s filter. Fill out online profiles ahead of time so that when an employer asks you if you filled out their online application, you can say yes. Make sure the resume you bring to the fair is free of errors, has an easy-to-read format, and highlights exactly what you want it to highlight. Job descriptions should be quantified with metrics, accomplishments, and keywords that are relevant to the industry and posting.

Spotlight Is On The human resource representatives at career fairs are viewing you even before it’s your turn to talk to them. Anything inappropriate you say or do in that room or while waiting on line will be noticed. Be on your best behavior. You should be dressed in interview attire, wearing a smile, and engaging those around you while you wait for your turn. You have only a minute to shine in the spotlight, but remember the spotlight is always on.

Answer the Question: Why You? If you are looking for an internship or job, you should have a pitch. Your pitch answers the question: “Why an employer should hire you.” You can’t think of what to say to that inquiry on the day of the fair. You need to know what skills make you a good candidate. If you don’t know why an employer should hire you, then they won’t. Those that tailor their pitch to match the industry, position, and employer get selected.

More than a Resume What gets you a follow-up meeting after the career fair is more than a resume.  It’s the combination of a good resume and your package presentation: speech, expressions, handshake…etc. Anything that would make the recruiter think you cannot represent their organization, clients, or products will move you into the do-not-pursue pile of applicants. Your communication skills, positive attitude, and energy need to come across the minute you step foot in front of the hiring representative. That is just as important as your resume.

The great thing about career fairs is that those seeking employment can have face time with dozens of recruiters. Hiring professionals that have posts to fill can meet hundreds of applicants.  It’s a win:win situation for both groups. Be the match an employer is looking for by taking your next career fair seriously and taking my advice.

I love to get feedback from recruiters as to what matches were made. When I look through the room of job seekers, I know who is making the cut. Can you spot the students who will do well at the career fair? Share your thoughts in the comments!

Conversation With a Career Center Rose

Smedstad-HeadshotShannon Smedstad, Employment Brand Director, Global Communications & Engagement Team, CEB
Twitter: @shannonsmedstad
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/shannonsmedstad
Blogs from Shannon Smedstad.

As someone who’s made a transition from being on the ground as a college recruiter to a behind the scenes role in employer branding, it’s not often that I get back on campus. However, when I do, it’s a rush of excitement! And, I make the most of those times by observing and talking to as many people as I can (career fairs are great “wells of inspiration” for blog posts).

Recently, I had the privilege of traveling to the University of Pennsylvania’s career fair in Philadelphia. From liberal arts to STEM and Wharton school majors, the students were prepared and exemplified a sense of pre-professionalism. I sat down with the director of Penn Career Services, Patricia Rose, to learn more about her 34 year career in helping to connect students with employers.

What is the role of career services?

Career services is a connector, we’re not a gatekeeper. We don’t have a monopoly on students; for us to be effective in this role as connector, we need to provide obvious value on both sides, to students and employers.

We also have new students coming in every year, and some that do not hear our messages until it’s of greatest importance to them. Therefore regular messaging is important—we have to continue to message over and over again. We have to be the place that has the right information for students.

What has been the greatest change that you’ve seen in career services?

The greatest change is the use of technology. It is easier now for students to get information on employers and easier for employers to get information on students, using LinkedIn, social media, and other tools.

What hasn’t changed?

There are some employers who continue to come on campus once per semester and do not keep us (career services) informed. It can’t be “one and done.” Employers who are successful are the ones that are committed to establishing a presence and make the effort.

How can employers best work with career services?

Work with us and keep us informed. If you are here, hosting a major event or bringing someone from your C-suite to campus, let us know; we can help you get an audience. The summer is a great time to meet with us or invite us to your location, so that we can have a conversation and talk about the best ways to work together.

Also, I would say to be open to students beyond the obvious majors. There are great students in non-business fields, across all majors and school boundaries.

What is your biggest employer pet peeve?

When employers impinge on another company’s “real estate” during career events. And, when companies put undo pressure on students into making offer decisions. They are taking their time to interview with other companies and to make thoughtful decisions. Don’t hound our students!

Read the Reasonable Offer Deadline Guidelines on NACEWeb.

Four Lessons We Can Learn From Business Leaders

BlessVaiBless Vaidian, Pace University Career Services and Founder, Career Transitions Guide
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/blessvaidian
Twitter: https://twitter.com/BlessCareers
Blog: http://careertransitionsguide.com

1) The biggest risk is not taking any risk… In a world that is changing really quickly, the only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks. – Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook Founder

Mark started Facebook in his Harvard dorm room. Was it risky to venture out as an entrepreneur? Yes! It’s risky to start or try anything new. Whether you are in college or a professional with years of experience, our career choices are often masked with uncertainty. Industry leaders will tell you that it’s because they were not afraid of taking risks, that they are successful today.

2) You may not realize it when it happens, but a kick in the teeth may be the best thing in the world for you. – Walt Disney

A few months ago, Business Insider published an article with a list of 23 successful people who failed at first. “Learn from life’s lessons and move on” was the underlying theme in all their stories. Don’t let failure keep you down. Sometimes when we don’t get what we want, another door opens. A mistake young college students make is to think that successful people never hit a rough patch. In fact successful people hit many obstacles, but keep moving forward.

3) We’re living at a time when attention is the new currency…Those who insert themselves into as many channels as possible look set to capture the most value. Participate or fade into a lonely obscurity. – Pete Cashmore, CEO of Mashable

Those people that are well branded and popular on social media outlets, and those with a wide circle of connections get job offers. Have your circle built so that when the time comes, your job search will be much faster than those that live in “obscurity.” The clients and students I work with that have a wide list of connections, attend events, and have a well-loved personality find jobs much faster. I work with hundreds of recruiters every year. They attend events to target candidates for open positions and to keep resumes on file for when there is a vacancy. If you are not getting out of the house and if you are not networking online, be prepared for a longer job search.

4) Technology empowers people to do what they want to do. It lets people be creative. It lets people be productive. It lets people learn things they didn’t think they could learn before, and so in a sense it is all about potential. – Steve Ballmer, Former CEO of Microsoft

When reading a job description, the skills required are clear. A college degree does not guarantee employment. But having all the skills required in a recruiter’s job posting does make you more marketable. Apply to jobs only after you acquire the skills. This way you will not waste the recruiter’s time or get discouraged when you don’t hear back from human resources. You can learn almost anything using online resources or by partnering with the right technology tools.

When a Student Reneges on a Job Offer – An Employer’s Perspective

kayla villwockKayla Villwock, Intern Program Manager, SAS
Twitter: @KaylaRenee8
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kaylavillwock

Hello NACE members, followers, and all! This is my first post as a NACE blog contributor and I am thrilled to be a part of the team. So how did I get here? I guess you can call it “being at the right place at the right time.” While volunteering at the registration booth at the NACE 2014 Conference, I was approached by a couple of NACE employees to be interviewed on my experience at the conference. At the end of my interview, they said “Hey – that was pretty good! Would you like to write for the NACE blog?” And well… here I am!

Ever since this moment I have been noodling on my first blog post. What would make for a good topic of discussion for both employers looking to hire from the university-space as well as career services professionals? I was drawing a blank. In my former role at NetApp (now at SAS), I often interface with career services professionals and it was through one of these conversations that I was enlightened for this post.

Last week during a pre-fall recruitment season planning call, one of my career services contacts mentioned her concern over an increasing trend at her university. She has noticed that more and more students were accepting offers of employment to then decline at a later date for a more appealing opportunity. I reassured her that this is happening at many universities and explained that employers were definitely feeling the effects. Based on this conversation, she asked that I create a brief write-up on the  impact of an offer “renege” that could be shared with students at the respective university. I then thought “I bet many universities would like this kind of information to share with their students.” And voila – my first blog post idea.

So, I want to share my thoughts on how employers are affected when a student accepts a job offer and then declines at a later date. The goal of this post is twofold: 1. To provide a resource for career service professionals to help students understand the negative impact and consequences for making the choice to back out on an offer of employment and 2. To begin a dialogue from industry and career service professionals on other challenges with this issue and discuss potential resolutions. I welcome your feedback and comments and have listed some discussion questions below. I look forward to hearing from you regarding this ever-popular issue as well as other topics as I begin my journey in the blogging world.

Enjoy!

-Kayla Villwock


When a Student Reneges on a Job Offer

1. Employers are missing out on great talent.

Campus recruiting has become fiercely competitive, especially for certain technical majors. It is now the status quo for employers to have most of their full-time entry-level job offers out in the fall before students head off for Thanksgiving break. Several university career centers have even set an ‘earliest deadline date’ by which employers must abide in order to limit the pressures of early deadlines on their students. When that deadline hits, it is understood by employers that most of the highly sought-after talent from the best universities will have already accepted an offer.

Now what about the other companies who may not be as early to the punch? These companies may get on campus in the spring and come in contact with a student who has already accepted an offer. One thing leads to another and next thing you know, a student is put in a tricky situation. The rockstar student decides to decline the original offer from Large Corporation A and go with XYZ start-up (just as an example). Large Corporation A is now in a pickle. They have an opening to fill, it is late in the season, and most of the ‘top’ students have job offers. Company A will likely reach out to the runner up candidates for the opening, only to find that they have accepted other jobs. At this point, it is likely that Large Corporation A will have to ‘settle’ for a student that is not as good of a fit as the original hire. This leads to unhappy recruiters, disgruntled hiring managers, and worst of all – a loss in confidence in hiring students in the first place.

Students: Think about this. When you accept a job offer, you may be filling the ‘dream job’ of one of your high-potential classmates. Keep this in mind as you are considering accepting an offer. If the role is not in line with your career wishes and goals – be patient and do not accept in the first place. There is likely a job out there that would fulfill all of your wishes. Likewise, there is probably someone else out there who would be ecstatic to have the job that you are unsure about accepting.

2. Recruiters and hiring managers have a loss of morale.

Imagine completing a Sudoku puzzle – a highly complex puzzle with pieces that must align in order for the puzzle to all fit into place – and then having a new one appear before your eyes and having to start all over again. Recruiting to fill an opening is often times like this puzzle. There are many moving parts to ensure you hire the right person into the right position. Recruiters keep a running tab on their openings – every position filled is one step closer to the end of the quest to fill them all – which in some cases is 100+ positions. When they are nearing the end of their mission and then they have to ‘re-do’ the puzzle, it is disheartening and quite frustrating.

The recruiters aren’t the only ones who frustrated by the decline. The acceptance of an offer by a student is followed by great excitement from the hiring manager. They quickly begin anticipating the arrival of their new hire. What work can they take on? Who will be their mentor? What new skill sets will they bring to the team? When they receive a decline after having done all of this planning, it is a huge disappointment. Sometimes it even causes anger – and rightfully so. They have to have to start reviewing resumes and begin the interview process all over again. The interview process not only takes up the manager’s time, but the time of their team members on the interview team. And time is money. All of this leads to a loss in morale from both the recruiter and hiring manager for finding the next great student to fill the role that has re-opened.

3. Positions go un-filled.

Many times a renege comes at the tail-end of the recruitment season – around April and May. At this time of the academic year, very few students are still searching for jobs. Recruiters spend a great deal of time spinning their wheels to fill the opening, and often the effort does not end in finding a good fit to fill the role. In this case, the position can go un-filled. In some cases, the budget set aside for the hire will be allocated for other purposes. This can have a great impact. Final hiring numbers are lowered which can in turn effect the following year’s hiring numbers. When managers have the opportunity to hire again in the future, they choose to open the new positions at a higher level to avoid going through losing headcount again. Ultimately, positions going un-filled does not help build the business case for hiring students.

What are the potential implications to a student for declining an offer after accepting?

1. Employer black-listing

Certain employers will keep a running list of names of student reneges – a ‘do not call’ list if you will. Even if it is not documented in this way – recruiters will remember. If a student was given a job offer, they were given one for a particular reason – because they stood out amongst the crowd. During the interview process, the recruiter sees the student’s name come through emails, looks at their resume many times, and talks about the candidate often with the hiring manager. All of this repetition leads to memorization. Therefore, when the candidate’s name comes up again in the future – it is tied to a negative experience that the recruiter will not forget. Consequently, the student’s choice that they made back in college could inhibit the opportunity of working with the employer in the future.

2. Loss of career services alumni privileges

Universities value their corporate partnerships greatly and do not condone students accepting an offer and then declining at a later date. They understand the impact it has to the companies and do not want to take the risk of having the respective companies stop recruiting their students. This being said, universities are putting their foot down on the trend of student reneges and are doing so through their career services center. Certain universities are denying access to job boards and career placement services if a student reneges on an offer and they find out about it.

3. The world is smaller than you think…

In an era of social media and virtual connections, the world has become very small. Many university recruiters, especially in similar industries, rub shoulders at recruiting events and communicate on a regular basis. They speak about and gather additional information in regards to the students who decline after accepting. LinkedIn makes this especially possible. In more than one occasion, I have heard of students declining a job offer after accepting due to ‘personal reasons’ or to ‘travel abroad’, to then have the recruiter see on LinkedIn that the student has accepted a job at a highly-acclaimed employer within weeks after the decline. This creates an impression of poor morals and can burn more bridges than the initial renege itself. If a student must make the decision is to decline after accepting, it is much more acceptable if there is a truthful and understandable reason behind the decision.

In end, everyone plays a part in ensuring that this trend does not become even more apparent in the university recruiting and career services world. Students must consider the negative effects and implications of making a decision to renege on an offer. Career service professionals should be a guiding voice when counseling students through their career decisions. And lastly, employers should be considerate in the recruiting process by giving a reasonable amount of time for an offer deadline so that the student can make an educated, well-thought-out decision in the first place.

For more information on NACE’s guidelines for career service and recruiting professionals, take a look at NACE’s Principles for Professional Practice.

NACE members will find a student-directed version of this article for your website in NACEWeb’s Grab & Go.


I want to hear your thoughts.

What do you believe is the root cause for the increase in offer reneges?

Has your organization done a study to analyze the root cause of the increase in offer reneges? If so, what were the findings?

Career Service Professionals: Are you penalizing students for declining an employer’s offer after having already accepted? If so, how?

Employers: Do you have a ‘black-listing’ process? Are you seeing any other adverse impacts due to student reneges?

 

Am I Mashed Up or Just Fried? A Journey Into Social Recruiting With Puppies (Part VI):

Chris Carlson

Christopher Carlson, Senior Manager, Talent Acquisition, Booz Allen Hamilton
Twitter: @cciCarlson
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/ccicrc
Blogs from Christopher Carlson

About two weeks ago, I had the chance to attend a social media/recruiting conference in New York City. It was a really great opportunity to learn about best practices in social recruiting from some real industry leaders. While in New York, I had the chance to visit the MoMA as well. If you have never been, it is really a wonderful museum full of amazing art. It got me thinking about something I wrote on my last blog, a quote from Tammy Garmey from TMP “Content is King but Context Rules.”

Our digital content is very much like art in many ways, in that the context in which we see the art can influence our interpretations. We have the chance to present our ideas and messages in so many different ways to reach a wide variety of audiences and tastes. It is always the context in which we view the art that dictates our appreciation.

Walking through the museum looking at amazing pieces by some of my favorite artists, I also noted that many people were using headsets to learn about the pieces and the artists—common in most museums. Some individuals were led by docents on official tours. Still others were outside listening to a live concert that MoMA had in their courtyard—experience art through music. Not only did MoMA expose people to the art works, they provided multiple ways to reach their audience. At this point, you may be saying, “so what is your point Chris?” Good question…

Let’s fast forward to a call with some 20+ representatives from a variety of companies and from the Jobs Accommodations Network (JANworks.org). On this call, we talked about how to make our recruiting content accessible to everyone including individuals with disabilities or differing abilities. We tried to focus the effort on organically created content developed by our employees. Most of the companies represented were already leaders in hiring individuals with disabilities, and we wanted to further enhance our outreach via social media.

A few key points resulting from the call included:

  • Use multiple channels to share your message: Not every social media tool has built-in accessibility and it is important that you don’t use just one to reach your audience. Just like the MoMA, consider options for your audience.
  • Make content accessible at the point of creation: Look for ways to cascade information about how to make content accessible to your employees so that as they create content it will be accessible. By doing so, it will better convey the real meaning and not lose perspective after someone else tries to make it accessible.
  • Include positive images of individuals with disabilities in your content: One thought is to partner with relevant ERGs or to work closely with your marketing team to make sure you have those positive images so that individuals will be drawn to you.
  • Make it routine: When building PowerPoint presentations or videos, always use built-in accessibility tools whether you need to do so or not. Having people make this part of their everyday will ensure that more content is accessible and easier to create.

For me, the discussion around content and making it accessible reminded me of one of the pieces in the MoMA. The piece was entitled “Still Life With Three Puppies.” Our messaging is like that painting. You can paint still life but it becomes so much more enriching and engaging when we include puppies. Find ways to incorporate varieties of media into your messaging such as captions into your videos or word descriptions of your photos. By doing so, more people will be drawn to your message just like we are drawn to the puppies.

There were definitely some other insights into specific tools that you can use and I will be happy to share those with you if you reach me. You can also reach to JAN at www.askjan.org. They are a great resource.

Bring More Than Just Jobs to Campus This Fall

Smedstad-HeadshotShannon Smedstad, Employment Brand Director, Global Communications & Engagement Team, CEB
Twitter: @shannonsmedstad
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/shannonsmedstad
Blogs from Shannon Smedstad.

When a company’s core message on campus is simply “WE’RE HIRING,” it can get lost amidst the other noise.  Students may have a difficult time differentiating jobs at one company over jobs at another. This is particularly true if your organization is new to campus, in a highly competitive industry, or relatively unknown.

According to the CEB 2014 Employment Branding Effectiveness Survey, millennials spend more than 50 percent less time than other generations researching organizations before they decide to apply. On average, millennials spent 12.4 hours learning about employers during their most recent job search, whereas other generations averaged 25.9 hours. Now more than ever, employers must think of innovative and “consultative” ways to increase their employer brand awareness to reach this highly sought after demographic.

One way to stand out, while continuing to add value to your overall campus relationships, is to do more than just promote jobs. You’ll also have to do more than just promote your company. Here are several ideas to brainstorm with your teams as you begin your fall planning:

Scholarships and Award Programs

What college student couldn’t use a little extra cash for school? Scholarships and other monetary awards—offered directly to target universities, via student organization partnerships, or through online submission platforms—are a great way to build brand awareness in a more altruistic way.

For example, if your company hires engineering majors, consider offering scholarships to second- and third-year students. This will allow you to identify engineering talent early and learn more about them, while also positioning your organization as a place that gives back.

Real Life Projects and Case Competitions

Years ago, my previous employer partnered with a professor at Penn State on a semester-long capstone project for one of his classes. We sponsored a team of five incredibly bright students as they worked through a real-world IT issue affecting our business. At the end of the semester, the CIO traveled with me to campus to listen to the group’s presentation. He was so impressed by the students that he wanted to make offers on the spot!

This is just one example of how companies can partner with universities to bring value to students’ academic experiences. It was a great way to get executive buy-in for future partnerships and to engage top university talent on a more consultative level.

Internships and Externships

Right now, many companies are in the throes of summer internship programs. The best companies know the value of providing meaningful work experiences to students. Executing a 10-week internship requires time, effort and resources, as well as people with a passion for developing talent. But what happens when summer is over and students are back on campus? By offering a week-long externship during breaks, organizations can continue to foster relationships and stay top-of-mind with key universities, pipeline candidates, and student organizations.

Purposeful Offerings With Business Outcomes

Building up additional programs on top of your existing campus strategy takes a lot of time and effort. Not only are talent acquisition teams expected to fill 50, 100, or 1,000 entry-level job openings, they are now being asked to commit to developing, marketing, administering, and measuring programs. This can be overwhelming to some campus recruiters, and the programs that should be adding value become just one more box to check.

Before rolling out a new program or revamping an existing one, find a champion—someone who’s excited about owning the program and driving results. A well thought-out initiative that is superbly executed can translate into real business outcomes, including:

•    Higher participation in on-campus events
•    Greater brand awareness at tier-one schools
•    Uptick in website traffic and social media engagement
•    Increased internship and/or full-time job applications
•    Increase in quality of hire due to early identification and relationship building

If your organization does not have the resources for add-on programs, another key way to attract students is through the interactions they have with your recruiters and hiring managers. Encourage your teams to take a more consultative approach to their recruiting or interviewing styles, by seeking to build relationships and trust, listen carefully, and foster open lines of communication.

Instead of funneling candidates through the hiring process like a widget on a conveyor belt, teach recruiters to focus on building relationships and creating positive candidate experiences. The CEB survey also states that millennials receive 12.5 percent more offers than other generations, so dedicating extra attention to the candidate experience is likely to help organizations improve their offer to acceptance conversion rates of millennial candidates.

Will your organization take more than just jobs to campus this fall? How are your teams taking a more consultative approach to hiring millennials? Share your insights below.

You’ll find more information on best practices in recruiting on NACEWeb.

Lessons Learned at #NACE14

ongDavid Ong, Director, Corporate Recruiting, Maximus, Inc.
Twitter: @dtong2565
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/dave-ong/0/604/513

It’s been two weeks since the 2014 NACE Conference, and I’ve finally recovered from the profound lack of sleep that I experienced in San Antonio. (For those of you that weren’t there, the non-stop networking combined with the excitement in the city from the Spurs NBA title win turned our hotel complex into a never-ending celebration chamber!)

With my batteries now re-charged, here are a few general observations from the conference:

1) Our profession is in a very dynamic phase—Is it just me, or was anyone else just in awe of how many critical issues and trends are hitting simultaneously. From First Destinations to OFCCP to Big Data to STEM Education……It’s clear that the game is changing big time! The conference was the perfect opportunity to exchange ideas with my peers, my customers, and our affiliate members.

2) Our future looks bright—If the conference first-time attendee session was any indication, we’re in great hands. The new attendees seemed so highly engaged, inquisitive, and truly excited about being NACE members and they wanted to know how to get more involved, which bodes well for all of our members. Every year this group gets bigger. Case in point: We typically split the newcomers into groups of about 15 people, and we assign past or present NACE board members to facilitate discussion. To our shock, we actually ran short on NACE board representatives! (Kudos to our terrific conference co-chairs Maura Quinn from Liberty Mutual and Fred Burke from Baruch College for stepping in to facilitate!)

3) We have some great leaders at NACE—How can anyone not be impressed by the performance of our fearless leader, Dan Black of EY? The guy attended almost every organized event, chatted with virtually everyone he met, enlightened (and entertained) us with his “Early Show” interviews of NACE award winners. He threw down the ultimate challenge to our members with a new member outreach proposal. He also did a great job with the passing of the torch to President Sam Ratcliffe of VMI, who did a wonderful job of welcoming first-time attendees and gave us an enlightening glimpse into the college recruiting future. Like many of you, I’m really psyched to see what Sam has in store for all of us now that he’s the president!

One last comment….There is real power in blogging—I’ve got to be honest….When the folks at NACE asked me to consider writing this blog, I was a little hesitant. Questions like “What am I going to write about?” “Will anybody read it?” and “If they read it, will they fall asleep?” all entered into my head. Thankfully, the NACE conference changed my view of blogging after I had several encounters with attendees who recognized me from the blog photo (Note to self: Pick up a gift for our company photographer.) and asked to take a selfie with them, which promptly got posted on social media outlets (Other note to self: Learn to take selfies from above not below.) I heard from other NACE bloggers that they had similar experiences to mine, so a huge thanks to those of you that took the time to let us know that you’re enjoying this latest communications outlet from NACE!

That’s it for now….Next NACE stop for me: the Summer of 2014 Board of Directors meeting in Boston.

You’ll find a list of NACE’s Board of Directors on NACEWeb. If you’re interested in becoming a member of the NACE Blog Team, contact Claudia Allen.