Make Your Resolution to Join the Advocacy Revolution

Marilyn MackesMarilyn Mackes, Executive Director
National Association of Colleges and Employers
Twitter: @NACEMarilyn
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/marilyn-mackes/8/210/a70

Before we know it, we will be reliving our holiday festivities through our phone camera pics and will be making New Year’s resolutions for 2014. Hmmm—choosing a new diet plan? Practicing the latest exercise regimen? Expanding the reading list?

Advocacy Mashup for Career ServicesI recommend creating an impact on our profession and the specific work we do by being a part of NACE advocacy initiatives. And there is one really great way to get started.

On January 31, 2014, NACE will host the Advocacy Mashup for Career Services in Washington, D.C. Those attending this one-day event (space is limited to the first 120 people registered—as of this writing we are filling up fast!) will participate in three focused sessions:

  1. First-destination surveys,
  2. Unpaid internships, and
  3. International students and immigration reform.

I know all of us engaged in career services recognize these as “hot topics” that directly touch the students and employers we serve. And they surface MANY questions for which we need answers.

So here’s my list of why attending this event should be one of your resolutions for the New Year:

  1. As lawmakers and institutional leaders place more emphasis on outcomes and “scorecards,” we need to know the what, how, and when for collecting data about our graduates. NACE’s First-Destination Task Force has released preliminary guidelines for career centers and institutions to deliver reliable and comparable outcomes data. (Federal agencies and legislators are already interested in these guidelines, so what better way to be prepared than to join us at the Mashup!)
  2. There has been much debate about the practice of unpaid internships—“valuable” work experience vs. “free” labor. You will gain information about the role of career services in the context of this issue and engage in discussion about current regulatory guidelines.
  3. Advising international students continues to challenge career services as current hiring restrictions limit their ability to gain employment. You will learn what proposed immigration legislation entails and how this could impact your services to students.
  4. Overall, you will hear from Washington experts from federal organizations and public policy groups addressing the issues that matter to you and your institution.
  5. This could be a great way to engage others at your institution that care about these issues, your vice-presidents and institutional research administrators in particular. Together you can get first-hand access to federal perspectives.

For more details about the event and to register, visit www.naceweb.org/events/advocacy-mashup.aspx

One last thought regarding your New Year’s resolution: Your voice counts, so whether it’s at the Advocacy Mashup or other advocacy initiatives that lie ahead, GET ENGAGED! To learn more, check out the information provided on NACEWeb.

Finally, though a bit early, I wish you all a very happy new year … and huge success with your resolutions!

Note: An employer-focused relations and recruiting mashup is planned for late March. Watch NACEWeb for details.

NACE Flash Poll – Are We Placement Officers?

kevin grubbNACE Ambassador Kevin Grubb
Assistant Director at Villanova University’s Career Center.
Twitter: @kevincgrubb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevingrubb
Blog: “social @ edu”

A hotly debated term in career services is “placement.” Are first-destination surveys reports on “placements” of students? Should career services offices take on the role of being “placement” officers? Especially with the college “return on investment” talk heating up, this is something I hear many discussing.

So, career services professionals, what do you think? Vote in the flash poll below and share your thoughts in a comment! (Note: flash poll votes are anonymous.)

 

For more on first-destination surveys (sometimes called “placement” surveys), read NACE’s Position Statement on First-Destination Surveys. First-destination surveys will be one of the topics discussed at the Advocacy Mashup for Career Services on January 31, 2014, in Washington, D.C.

The Assessment Diaries: Beyond Satisfaction

Desalina Allen

A post by NACE Guest Blogger, Desalina Allen, Senior Assistant Director at NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development
Twitter: @DesalinaAllen
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/desalina

I almost waited to write this post until my assessment of our recent Dining for Success (DFS) etiquette dinner was complete.  Almost. I wanted to write about the learning demonstrated via our pre- and post-assessment after I was sure they actually demonstrated students learned something. Then I realized that I promised to provide a realistic overview of what it’s like to work with assessment day-to-day.

You know how sometimes when you start something new, more experienced people say things like “it’s not so scary” or “you’ll get the hang of it in no time”?  I may be guilty of saying these exact things when introducing assessment to others.  But I have a confession: The assessment of this event is scaring me.

Our DFS program has always been a hit with employers and students.  How do we know they like it?  We give out a post event survey that basically measures satisfaction with the event (and allows students to rate their overall learning):

The truth is, how could you not like an event like this? They get a great (oftentimes free) meal at a popular local restaurant, a chance to network, and tons of dining and interview tips. This is why moving away from a satisfaction survey is so scary – students are generally satisfied with our events and it’s rewarding (and easy) to share a summary of these surveys (95% of students reported that they would recommend this event to friends!).   

The problem is that, as educators, satisfaction isn’t all that we care about.  We want students to walk away having learned something from our events and learning can be challenging to measure. So, in an effort to make sure students were actually walking away with new information we prioritized topics of importance, introduced more structured activities to teach these topics, and provided enhanced training for our employers and staff.  

In assessment lingo: we set learning goals!  Here they are:

Students will be able to….

  • Identify the proper table arrangements at a formal dinner (including placement of silverware, bread plate, water and wine glass)

  • List two guidelines regarding what to order during a mealtime interview

  • List three appropriate discussion topics for a networking event

  • List three topics to avoid discussing during a networking event

  • List appropriate ways to follow up with professionals after events

To evaluate these goals, we measured students’ current level of knowledge with a pre event survey sent out with registration confirmations: you can view it here. Then at the end of the event, we had students fill out a nearly identical paper survey and encouraged input from employers and career services staff.  We also asked them ONE satisfaction question (because, hey, satisfaction is also important).

We are still tabulating the students’ responses and it’s nerve wracking.  I’m hoping I can share some really great improvements in their knowledge but there is always a risk that this doesn’t show up clearly in the survey results.  

Being that this is the first time we’ve approached the assessment of this event with pre and post surveys I’m sure there will be changes we need to make to the process.  I’ll be sharing the results and what we learned from this process in a follow up post but would love readers to share their experience setting and evaluating learning goals.  Has it worked for you? Have you evaluated programs this way? Any tips for pre and post surveys? What were the results? Any feedback on the learning goals or survey?

Resume Ramblings: The Objective

Marc Goldman, Executive Director, Career Center, Yeshiva University

Marc Goldman, Executive Director, Career Center, Yeshiva University
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/marcjgoldman Twitter: @MarcGoldmanNYC

Throughout my 20-year career in this business, I have reviewed more than my share of student and alumni resumes.  At the beginning of my career, an objective statement was a fairly common element on resumes and one suggested by many career counselors.  Over the past two decades, I have heard great debate over this brief introductory statement.  And today, it is viewed by some as the appendix (non-vital organ reference) of the resume.  Some counselors and employers opine that it should never be included.  Others say it can still be helpful to the job seeker to kick off their application document.  And of course, the more astute professionals (or fellow alumni of my Psych 101 course at Cornell), will put forth, “It depends.”

Here at Yeshiva University, my team has volleyed this bouncing ball of confusion back and forth many times.  We decided to take it to the street, so to speak, and survey some of our partner employers to solve this elusive mystery once and for all.  What did we learn from this quickie survey of a small sampling of employers?

  • 43 percent responded that they are fine with an objective that is a one-line statement of the targeted goal of the resume
  • 11 percent responded that they are fine with an objective that is a longer statement including specific candidate qualifications
  • 18 percent responded that they are fine with an objective that is more of a detailed summary of the resume
  • 27 percent responded that they did not want to see an objective on a resume at all

Basically, we noted a diversity of opinions in our survey results, which mirror the myriad views on the subject I have encountered over time.  Where do I stand at this point in my career?  No more stalling, Goldman.  Fess up and proclaim to the World Wide Web your thoughts on the objective.  Here goes nothing…

The objective is – wait for it – OPTIONAL.  I have always believed that and still do to this day.  There are situations when it can be helpful and effective for an applicant, and there are times when it is useless and pure fluff.  Here are a few points related to my philosophy on this “important” topic:

1)      An objective can provide a resume with direction when it might not otherwise have a clear one.

2)      An objective can note the target of a career transition when the resume content only details transferable skills from indirectly related experience.

3)      An objective can help the student with extremely limited experience demonstrate a goal in mind to prospective employers.

4)      An objective can provide the introduction you need when a contact is passing along your resume as a referral to another contact and so on and so on.  Did I just date myself with this obscure shampoo commercial reference?

5)      An objective is unnecessary when there is a strong clear theme to one’s resume.

6)      An objective is unnecessary when you are sending a cover letter in which you discuss your intentions as an applicant.  (Alas, the devil’s advocate in me voices the opinion that many employers don’t read the cover letter, so maybe an objective is still needed.  Ah, the cover letter.  A tale for another blog entry!)

7)      IF an objective is used on the resume, please be specific.  I actually saw one recently that I shall paraphrase as the following, “Looking for a position in the working field.”  Okay, that’s a bit extreme, but you get my meaning.

What does all of this signify in the greater job search scheme of things?  Will the objective or absence of one make or break one’s shot at that dream opportunity?  All I can tell you is that the objective is something quite subjective.

New Millennial Attitudes on Technology and Their Future

kevin grubbA post by NACE Ambassador Kevin Grubb
Assistant Director at Villanova University’s Career Center.
Twitter: @kevincgrubb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevingrubb
Blog: “social @ edu”.

Working in the field of college career services and college recruiting fascinates me. There are many reasons why, but one of the foremost is that speaking with college students keeps me on my toes. With every new class comes a new set of trends to consider.

The "New Millennials"

The “New Millennials” are the next to enter higher education. What trends will they bring with them?

For the past several years and in the next several to come, many of the trends center around Millennials. Viacom, parent company of MTV, VH1, Comedy Central and more, recently released some insightful information about the “New Millennials” – the younger set of Millennials, now ages 13-17. As many of them are the college students of tomorrow, I considered reading this as future-minded professional development for myself. Here are my five most interesting facts from the report:

  1. A large majority of New Millennials are worried that the economy of today will have a negative impact on their future. I see anxiety about getting a job in the “real world” in current students frequently, and this finding makes me wonder what concerns and emotions New Millennials will bring to the table.
  2. The percentage of New Millennials who agree that “My parents are like a best friend to me” is up 10 percent (now to 68 percent) since 2010. I am reminded instantly of the “Bring Your Parents to Work” day idea discussed already on the NACE blog.
  3. 70 percent of New Millennials report that “I learn how to do things on YouTube” or “I go to YouTube for DIY videos.” Confession: YouTube helped me learn how to tie a necktie. So, maybe this goes for us “old Millennials,” too. The finding also makes me glad we’ve already been working on our YouTube presence in our office.
  4. 80 percent of New Millennials say that “Sometimes I just need to unplug and enjoy the simple things.” This just makes me happy. I have a group of Millennial friends that I get together with on Sundays for breakfast. All of us are in education, whether primary, secondary, or higher, and we often talk about how we hope students will break from technology from time to time. I hope this continues.
  5. A key finding of the report is that New Millennials are increasingly finding private ways to share things on social media. On the flip side, I read recently that Facebook is now requiring all users to be available in a Facebook search. I hear discontent with Facebook often from students and friends. Will this shift be another notch against the world’s largest social network?

NACE blog readers, what’s your take on Millennials and trends in our work?

Image credit: flickr.com

The Assessment Diaries: 5 Questions to Ask Before Creating a Survey

Desalina Allen

A post by NACE Guest Blogger, Desalina Allen, Senior Assistant Director at NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development
Twitter: @DesalinaAllen
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/desalina

In addition to some of the methods I’ve already mentioned surveys can be a great way to collect both quantitative and qualitative information from students, employers and other key career services stakeholders. There are definitely questions you should ask yourself before deciding that a survey is the right collection method, but I’ll save those for another post.

For now, let’s assume you are dead set on surveying and you just don’t want to end up like this guy:

Image courtesy of GifBin.com

Here are five questions to ask yourself before you start designing and distributing your survey:

What information do I absolutely need to collect? Consider whether you already have access to accurate information on students like major, department and graduation date before asking these questions in your survey.  If you do, you can ask for a student ID and match up the two sets of information.  Many of the online survey software platforms also allow you to upload a list of survey recipients and send each one a customized hyperlink so you don’t need to collect name and contact information. When we survey, we rarely ask for school, major or grad date because we often have this information updated via our Career Services Management System and/or registrar records.  Two or three fewer questions, now that’s exciting.

What is your population? When you review your results or write your report, what is the group that you are trying to describe?  Will it be students who attended a resume seminar (more specifically: a resume seminar on December 13 or any resume seminar throughout the year)? Is it all juniors, or only juniors who have completed summer internships?  Having a clear understanding of  your population, will help you answer the next question which is:

How many responses do I need? Depending on your survey method, budget and population size you may not get responses from everyone.  This is OK – statistics allows you to describe your population without having data from everyone. This chart is really helpful – find the approximate size of your population on the far left column and then find the corresponding number of responses necessary to describe that population.  For example if you are trying to describe a population of 25,000 undergraduate students, you may only need between 700 and 10,000 responses – depending on how certain you want assumptions to be.  You should also be sure that there is not a difference in the group that did and did not respond to your survey.  For example, if all of your responses came from people who attended a particular event, your results may be skewed as these people may differ from the total population.  Finally, do some benchmarking and check past reports to get an idea about the response rate that is considered reasonable.  In the example above, a 40 percent response rate (10,000/25,000) may be acceptable for a student satisfaction survey but not for your annual first destination survey.

How will I collect this information?  Websites like SurveyMonkey offer free accounts and many institutions have licenses for software such as Qualtrics (my platform of choice). Of course there is always the old fashioned paper and pencil method, which is still a very effective way to collect information. Career Service professionals may also check to see if their existing Career Services Manager system offers surveying features (Symplicity’s NACElink system offers this as an add-on).

Will multiple methods be required to achieve the desired number of responses? Using one method of surveying may not be enough to achieve your target response rate or get the information you need.  Consider using a combination of paper forms, online surveying, phone surveying, in-person interviews, and even online research. My fellow NACE guest blogger, Kevin Grubb, mentioned that the new NACE position statement on first destination surveys will now use the term “knowledge rate” instead of response rate as we often collect information from faculty, employers, and even LinkedIn research to gather information about our students career outcomes.

What do you think? Add your thoughts in the comments section!

Twitter for Job Search: Be the Smartest Candidate in the Room

20111112_weinberg-048-Edit-web[1]

A post by NACE Guest Blogger, Pamela Weinberg
Website: www.pamelaweinberg.com
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/pamelaweinberg/
Twitter: @pamelaweinberg

For most job seekers LinkedIn is the “go-to” social media site. (I will talk about LinkedIn in another post.) I have been encouraging students lately to take to Twitter to get the most up-to-date information about the companies and industries they are interested in and to build their personal brands.

Here are some tips you can share with students about using Twitter for the job search:

  • Follow companies where you would like to work. You will have real time information on hiring, expansion, and new product development. And when the time comes for an interview, you will be completely up-to-date on company happenings.
  • Follow industry experts. Not sure who they are? Check out www.listorious.com to see who the top tweeters are in each industry.
  • Retweet relevant posts. Your twitter posts should reflect your career interests and aspirations. A student interested in a marketing position should follow and repost interesting and topical articles about marketing.
  • Search for jobs: Websites such as www.twitjobsearch.com list many positions only found through Twitter. Why? Because employers want to hire those who are social media savvy.
  • Connect Directly: Someone that you follow say something interesting and you want to comment? Go right ahead! It’s a great way to develop relationships with experts in your chosen field. Anyone on Twitter can be sent a direct message by placing the @ before their Twitter handle in the message box.

Want to get started? Tweet me at @PamelaWeinberg!

Expanding the Reach of Our NACE Membership

Marc Goldman, Executive Director, Career Center, Yeshiva University

Marc Goldman, Executive Director, Career Center, Yeshiva University
LinkedIn:  http://www.linkedin.com/in/marcjgoldman
Twitter: @MarcGoldmanNYC

I have always been proud to be an active NACE member, volunteering my time and efforts for the betterment of our profession and the chance to connect with colleagues across the country and the world.  In the past, from a financial standpoint, it has been challenging to share this membership with my team.  I have wanted my staff to feel like a part of our profession on a grander scale and to benefit from such a robust wealth of resources, information, and support as much I have throughout the years.

Until this year, I was a member under our institutional membership status, and one staff member also had an e-membership.  Now, under the new tiered membership system, our member fees increase by only about 50 percent, but this allows FIVE professionals in my office to have full membership instead of TWO!  As soon as I saw the NACE e-mail promotion of this new system, I called NACE to adjust our 2013 membership status, so my team could reap the same rewards from NACE that I have enjoyed for so many years.

The Spotlight online newsletter and extensive survey reports issued by NACE will be shared across our two campuses and members of our team much more easily.  NACE website information, Principles, white papers, best practices, and networking will be easily accessible by members of my team when they choose to research and explore for their own professional development and the improvement of our office.  Member rates for conferences and webinars will also extend to more team members, making the case for their attendance and involvement an easier one to make to upper administration.

There are clear gains in sight for our future with this new model of membership.  My team will be better informed and more involved with a greater sense of commitment to our field and our professional organization.  I have always tried to emphasize a team approach to effectively functioning as a college career center.  In spirit, our staff structure is as flat as we can possibly make it.  I believe NACE has taken a great step forward in making this more feasible than ever before.  Thank you, NACE!

The Next Recruitment and Retention Strategy: Bring Your Parents to Work Day?

kevin grubbA post by NACE Ambassador Kevin Grubb
Assistant Director at Villanova University’s Career Center.
Twitter: @kevincgrubb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevingrubb
Blog: “social @ edu”.

Phil Dunphy, the ultimate peerent

“Modern Family” star Ty Burrell plays the ultimate peerent, Phil Dunphy.

 

There was “bring your daughter to work” day. There was “bring your dog to work” day (and, for many employers, dogs are welcome all the time). Now, “bring your parents to work” day? Yes, as noted in a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, “Should You Bring Mom and Dad to the Office?” Some employers are already doing it. I can’t help but immediately think of Phil Dunphy of Modern Family fame, a strong advocate for “peerenting,” who would probably love this in a hilarious, awkward and endearing kind of way that only he could.

Numerous generational experts and studies have noted that Millennials, the college students of today, have a much closer relationship with their parents than generations past. Anecdotes supporting this are easy to find. Why the change? Often cited reasons are new technology keeping the generations in constant communication mixed with the conventional parenting wisdom of the generation prior. Whatever the cause, some employers, like Google, Northwestern Mutual and PwC, are embracing this shift. All three are mentioned in the WSJ article and are employing strategies to thoughtfully involve parents in the work environments of their employees.

Parental involvement in the career development and recruiting process needs to be carefully handled, to say the least. As a Millennial in this field, articles like this especially make me reflect. I thought of the following:

Situations where things could get difficult with parental involvement:

  1. Bringing parents to a career fair or networking event. Even though everyone might have the best intentions in mind, adding a parent to the dynamic of the conversation could get complicated.
  2. Parents sitting in on an interview. Same as above.
  3. Parents negotiating offers for candidates. As Jaime Fall, Vice President of the HR Policy Association, notes in the article, there could be privacy issues that prevent employers from sharing offer information with parents.

Situations where I think parental involvement could be great:

  1. Candidates asking parents for advice about a career transition. Very few people have quite the long-range view of an individual like parents do, and they, being a generation older, may provide some useful insight.
  2. Employees bringing parents to a work function that, for whatever reason, encouraged invitations to parents and/or family. If: (a) it is part of the culture and (b) the employees can trust themselves and their parents to act appropriately and respect boundaries, then I think this could be fun.

What do you think, NACE blog readers? Are we going to see more “Bring Your Parents to Work” days?

Image source: screenshot from YouTube