Career Exploration Infographic Activity

Ross WadeCareer Infographic – Ross Wade, assistant director, Duke University Career Center
Personal blog: http://mrrosswade.wordpress.com/
LinkedIn URL: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rosswade
Twitter: @rrwade
Blogs from Ross Wade.

As career advisers, assessment is an important part of our job—especially when it comes to helping students explore careers and themselves. As a visual person; adviser for students interested in media, arts, and entertainment; and infographic lover; I’ve been tinkering with ways to make assessment more fun and creative.

So I present to all of you….(drum roll please)…the career exploration infographic activity! I’m sure someone else has already thought of this, but the idea occurred to me recently, and I wanted to share with all of you.

The purpose of this activity is for students to assess and rank their values, interests, Career Infographic - Ross Wadestrengths, and identity (personal or professional) in a creative and graphic way. It could be facilitated during a one-on-one session or as a part of a program or workshop on self-exploration. I used PowerPoint to design my infographic (click on the image to make it larger), but anything could be used, including pencil and paper—the point is to get creative. If you decide to use images from the web, I suggest using Creative Commons to find images that can be legally used on the web and without attribution.

Steps:

  1. Have your student select a picture, symbol, or graphic that represents her/his identity. For example, I’ve worn big, black glasses for a long time, and they’ve become a part of my “look”—they also reflect my love of learning, and my personal culture. Choosing glasses also gave me a clever way of reflecting information visually in pie chart format.
  2. Ask you student to reflect on his/her values, interests, and skills. This could be through a card sort or brainstorm. Once they have their lists completed, have them pick their top three of each. Once their top three are picked, have them rank each one with its own graphic—each graphic will represent 10 percent. For example, creativity, autonomy, and security equal 100 percent of my top values, I used a ladder graphic to represent 10 percent increments, so my values are sorted 50 percent creativity, 30 percent  autonomy, and 20 percent security (equaling 100 percent).
  3. Facilitate a discussion about other things your student would like to have as a part of his/her career—e.g., consider topics such as amount of time with people versus things, time spent in and out of the office. Your student can use his/her personal symbol in creative ways to reflect this information. For example, I used the lenses of my glasses as a very basic pie chart.

What I like about this activity is that it has several applications. It can be used to assess current values, interests, and skills, and bring to light how a student views her/his identity. Doing it multiple times, over four years (or each semester), allows you and your student to see how things have evolved and bring to light great opportunities to discuss why things have changed or what prompted the change. Finally, I think it would be interesting if a parent, friend, or manager/supervisor created an infographic for their students, and then the two—student and other person—compared what they created and discussed. Does the internship supervisor see the same skills and interests as her/his student? Does the on-campus job manager choose an identity symbol close to what their supervisee chose…or are they totally different? Think of all the interesting conversations that could come from this activity about values, skill, interests, self-marketing, and professional identity!

What ideas have you been using with students? Please share them with me and other blog readers in the comments section below.

NACE and the Power of Engagement

Dan Black

Dan Black, Americas Director of Recruiting, EY
Twitter: @DanBlack_EY
LinkedIn: Dan Black

“I’m engaged!!” I can still remember my (now) wife uttering that phrase over and over the night that I proposed to her more than 15 years ago. It was a wonderful feeling: listening to the excitement in her voice as she spoke to what seemed to be everyone she knew—and maybe even a few people she didn’t—to share the happy news. I, too, was caught up in the euphoria of the moment, recounting the story and reflecting on our joyous new relationship status and the promise of wonderful things to come. It’s an experience and a feeling that I will never forget.

As I reflect back on my year as NACE President, I’m once again finding myself in awe of the power of engagement, and the bright future that it is securing for our association. NACE Board service provides a unique purview into many aspects of the organization: the strategic planning, the tireless work of the NACE staff, and the focus on innovation, to name a few. But above all, it gave me a new appreciation for the variety of opportunities available to our members to make a real, tangible impact on our organization and the profession; the chance to be truly engaged. One of my fellow past presidents and colleagues, Andy Ceperley, describes engagement as “feeling the commitment, believing that our contributions are important, and caring deeply about advancing a cause or a body of work.” I think that’s the perfect definition, and gets to the heart of what I experienced and observed: the most engaged members were those who found ways to make their involvement personal. For some, that means serving in leadership roles on the Board, committees, or task forces. But for many others, it means contributing in ways that may seem less “official” on the surface, but are every bit as critical to the success of the association. Countless members advance our mission by hosting events, imparting valuable leading practices, delivering content, or sharing their NACE experience.

Other members reached out to me, personally, to provide input in the form of innovative suggestions, real time feedback on NACE offerings, and offers to assist with new initiatives. The creation of the new NACE Ambassador program at the end of my term provided the opportunity for members to truly customize their involvement while assisting with member outreach and inclusion. Together, these opportunities provide a powerful platform for engagement. And, it’s taught me to appreciate the fact that when individual members feel empowered to contribute in a variety of ways, the membership as a whole truly reaps the benefits.

Before I close, let me draw one last parallel. NACE engagement, like any serious personal commitment, requires a conscious and deliberate effort on behalf of the individual. I would encourage each of you to actively seek out ways to make a contribution in a way that is meaningful to you. I can tell you from experience that there are countless ways to get involved and that the rewards—much like those I’ve enjoyed ever since I said “I Do”—are immeasurable.

Top 5 Tips for Using Career Services

Candace LambCandace Lamb, career coach, University of Louisville Career Development Center
Twitter: @candace_lamb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/candacelamb1
Blog: www.theproactiveprofessional.com

I often hear complaints from new college graduates that career services didn’t get them a job. Something many students don’t understand is that career development centers are not placement organizations. Career services professionals are there to help provide students with the tools to figure out what they want to do professionally and how to best market themselves for the job search. With that being said, here are the top tips I give students to effectively using the career services.

Keep in mind: career service professionals are not there to give you a job or place you in a job.

Consider this: if you wanted to get married in the next few years, would you really want a dating service to handpick your future spouse, or even give you a half dozen people to choose from? Perhaps that sounds better than going out on dozens of blinds dates, but think it through. Before you can have a successful relationship, you must have a deep understanding of who you are (your likes, dislikes, needs, deal breakers, future goals, etc.) as well as the necessary tools to make a relationship great (trust, open communication, intimacy, etc.).

In the same way, career development offices are here to help you figure out the kinds of careers you’re interested in based on your values, interests, and personality, and how to pursue those careers.

Think about what you’d like to get from your meeting with career services staff before the appointment. 

Many times, I’ve had students come in and ask for their resumes to be critiqued.  Twenty minutes later, they admit that they’re unsure of their major or feel they need practice interviewing. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with having several needs, but it will make easier for everyone if you consider what those needs are before heading into your career coaching session. We don’t always realize we have more than one issue and that’s completely fine. If you can, though, consider how you’d like your career adviser to help and what areas you feel need the most attention.

Realize that career development is a process.

I think of our lives as being in a constant state of evolution. Our wants, needs, and goals change based on our experiences and the things we learn about ourselves.  The mistake I see so many people (not just students!) make is feeling like a failure for changing their career plans. It is not uncommon to realize you don’t fit in with the culture of a company or professional field. It is not strange to figure out that you don’t have the skills necessary for the job your friends or family are pressuring you to take (an example of this would be an artistic student realizing that they have no skills or interest in the field of medicine). You are not a failure for realizing a career path is wrong for you in your senior year. You are not useless because you don’t know what you want to do with the rest of your life as a college freshman.

Come back for multiple sessions.

In the same way that career development is a process, the job search does not end when you submit your resume. The career path does not stop when you figure out your major. Career services can help you edit your resume, prepare for interviews, understand your personality type, and deal with the stressors that come with choosing a profession. Develop a relationship with a career coach and maintain it through your time in college.

Don’t be afraid to call on alumni career services for help

Most colleges and universities have programs, career advisers, and assistance for alumni. Sometimes these services cost money, but they can help you tailor your resume to the different organizations or career fields you’re pursuing and help you learn to be a proactive professional.

Bonus Tip:

If you meet with a career adviser and don’t feel like they are listening to you, or you don’t feel comfortable speaking openly with them, ask for another career adviser! Every student and every adviser is different–sometimes one person isn’t the right fit for you and that’s okay.

Finding the right career can be one of the most rewarding things you do in life. Many students believe that college is a time to go to class, go to parties, and be involved in student organizations. While these can be great experiences and teach you so much about yourself, don’t forget to plan for your career. We spend so much of our lives at work—it is my opinion that figuring out what you want to do with your life is as important as knowing who you want to marry or the kind of person you want to be. Career advisers help you make the journey from college to career a rewarding one. Take advantage!

How Do You Help Students Avoid the Quarter-Life Crisis?

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Pamela Weinberg
Website: www.pamelaweinberg.com
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/pamelaweinberg/
Twitter: @pamelaweinberg
Blogs from Pamela Weinberg.

I have had the pleasure and disappointment of meeting with a slew of young professionals in my career coaching practice of late. It is a pleasure, because I enjoy connecting with these bright, interesting and thoughtful Millennials. It is disappointing, however, that so many of them are unhappy with their post-college career choices. A few years out of college, they are experiencing some of the symptoms of a so-called “quarter-life crisis.” There has been much written about the quarter-life crisis affecting recent the college graduate starting out a career and living on his or her own for the first time. These young adults may be faced with their first crisis of confidence and feel adrift. Many feel dissatisfied with their job choices and/or chosen career path and don’t know where to turn for help.

How we can help prevent young alumni from falling into a quarter-life crisis? One way to mitigate these issues for the next slew of college grads is for colleges and universities to take a more active role in preparing students for the workplace. Those students majoring in one of STEM fields or who are pre-med most likely have a more direct and focused career path than an English major with a degree that opens him or her up to dozens of potential job or career possibilities. But just what are those possibilities and how is a student to know about them? Without exposure to a myriad of careers and a sense of which skills/aptitudes are needed to succeed at which jobs, it is a challenge for students to find their perfect fit post-graduation. Ben Carpenter’s recent op-ed in The New York Times has received a lot of attention as he brings this issue to the fore and calls on colleges and universities to offer courses in “career training” which would begin freshman year and end senior year.

Others seem to agree. In a new book entitled Aspiring Adults Adrift sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa speak about colleges and universities “focusing too much on students’ social lives at the expense of strong academic and career road map.” The authors go on to recommend programs that “facilitate school-to-work transitions, in terms of internships, apprenticeships and job-placement programs.”

Career services offices at colleges and universities have always been the student nexus for career- and job-search advice—but as we know, not all students take advantage of the resources there. In championing the idea of four years of career training for college students, Ben Carpenter cites Connecticut College which offers a career training program that has proven quite successful. According to Carpenter, one year after graduation, 96 percent of Connecticut College alumni are employed or in graduate school. That is in stark contrast to the numbers from a recent job poll conducted by AfterCollege, the online entry-level job site. According to the poll, 83 percent of college seniors graduated this year without a job.

The letters to the editor of The New York Times, which followed the Carpenter piece, were squarely split. Most educators were against schools offering career training programs, while most parents were for it. It seems however, that there is more that can be done to prevent recent alums from floundering a few years post-graduation. However, whether these are offerings from career services or through other academic departments is a topic up for debate.

I would love to hear your comments, thoughts, and suggestions on the topic!

Career Fairs and How to be a ‘Match’

BlessVaiBless Vaidian, Pace University Career Services and Founder, Career Transitions Guide
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/blessvaidian
Twitter: https://twitter.com/BlessCareers
Blog: http://careertransitionsguide.com

 

With on-campus recruitment and career fairs in full swing, Bless Vaidian offers advice and insight to share with students.

Career fairs showcase match making between employers and job seekers. Numerous screening interviews take place under one roof and in under a few hours. If a student is not a fit, he or she will not be selected by the recruiter for the next round. Only those that “match” proceed.

College campuses are an ideal place to find job and internship fairs. I have worked on and managed career fairs over the years. Those students that are serious about getting a job or internship need to follow this advice: 

Prep You cannot walk into a career fair and wing it if you are serious about finding employment. Just as research is key to interview success, it’s also crucial for the fair. Find out ahead of time what organizations will be attending. Then check out the websites of your target companies, view their job postings, read their latest articles/tweets, and find out if you know anyone in your extended circle that works there. Saying you will “take anything,” shows you are not prepared. And, you will wind up with nothing.

Pre-Screening Recruiters at job and internship fairs have two piles of resumes. Your goal is to make it to the pile that passes the recruiter’s filter. Fill out online profiles ahead of time so that when an employer asks you if you filled out their online application, you can say yes. Make sure the resume you bring to the fair is free of errors, has an easy-to-read format, and highlights exactly what you want it to highlight. Job descriptions should be quantified with metrics, accomplishments, and keywords that are relevant to the industry and posting.

Spotlight Is On The human resource representatives at career fairs are viewing you even before it’s your turn to talk to them. Anything inappropriate you say or do in that room or while waiting on line will be noticed. Be on your best behavior. You should be dressed in interview attire, wearing a smile, and engaging those around you while you wait for your turn. You have only a minute to shine in the spotlight, but remember the spotlight is always on.

Answer the Question: Why You? If you are looking for an internship or job, you should have a pitch. Your pitch answers the question: “Why an employer should hire you.” You can’t think of what to say to that inquiry on the day of the fair. You need to know what skills make you a good candidate. If you don’t know why an employer should hire you, then they won’t. Those that tailor their pitch to match the industry, position, and employer get selected.

More than a Resume What gets you a follow-up meeting after the career fair is more than a resume.  It’s the combination of a good resume and your package presentation: speech, expressions, handshake…etc. Anything that would make the recruiter think you cannot represent their organization, clients, or products will move you into the do-not-pursue pile of applicants. Your communication skills, positive attitude, and energy need to come across the minute you step foot in front of the hiring representative. That is just as important as your resume.

The great thing about career fairs is that those seeking employment can have face time with dozens of recruiters. Hiring professionals that have posts to fill can meet hundreds of applicants.  It’s a win:win situation for both groups. Be the match an employer is looking for by taking your next career fair seriously and taking my advice.

I love to get feedback from recruiters as to what matches were made. When I look through the room of job seekers, I know who is making the cut. Can you spot the students who will do well at the career fair? Share your thoughts in the comments!

Career Coaching Notes: Career Counseling vs. Career Services

Rayna Anderson

Rayna A. Anderson, career counselor, University of Houston
Twitter: @Rayna_Anderson
LinkedIn: www.LinkedIn.com/in/RaynaA
Blog: RaynaAnderson.wordpress.com
Blogs from Rayna Anderson

I love being a career counselor. I enjoy the long conversations that I get to have with students as they navigate their educational and professional paths. I love running into them on campus and being introduced to their friends as they share stories of how helpful our appointments have been. Most of all, I revel in the e-mails and thank-you notes that I receive after they’ve landed that first job or internship. In a simpler world, I’d wear clogs to the office every day and conduct my appointments from a dimly lit room while sitting on a beanbag chair. But these are not simpler times; there are parts of this job that require much more effort and precision.

Aside from counseling, working in career services includes maximizing the potential of office management software, writing learning outcomes, developing strategic plans, and collecting first-destination data. We shouldn’t have the luxury of disassociating with aspects of the job that we don’t find as fun as one-on-one meetings with students. “I don’t ‘do‘ social media”, or “I’m not big on assessment” are not acceptable responses given the changing needs of students and employers.

We’re no longer in the placement phase of the 1940s, nor are we in the counseling era of the 1960s, 70s, or 80s. We’re in the hyperactive world of virtual resources and global perspectives. We’re in the middle of a war zone, fighting a battle of tradition versus trajectory.

Being a career counselor means being sensitive to student needs; being a career services professional means meeting those needs by any means necessary. Growing your career center staff, partnering with faculty to offer a wide range of career courses, and embedding a career development component in first-year seminars are only a few ways to get on track with current trends.

Are you prepared to join in on the fight? Are you prepared to be a career services professional? Comment below and share with us how your career center is fighting (and hopefully winning) the battle against ineffective traditions!

Find tips and best practices in career counseling and coaching on NACEWeb.