Don’t Miss Your Chance at NACE Honors and Awards!

Marc Goldman, Executive Director, Career Center, Yeshiva University

Marc Goldman, Executive Director, Career Center, Yeshiva University
Twitter: @MarcGoldmanNYC
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/marcjgoldman

I am a big fan of awards shows on television.  For decades, I have watched the Oscars, Emmys, Tonys, Golden Globes, People’s Choice, SAG Awards, and even the occasional Grammys or MTV Video-Music Awards.  Do they even show videos on MTV anymore?  Ah the good old days of MTV when it was hair bands, pop idols, and vee-jays!  But I digress.  When I entered the field of career counseling, I never imagined we would have our very own awards, honoring individuals, schools, and employers who developed groundbreaking and trendsetting ideas, programs, resources, and services.  Well, we do applaud these colleagues, and NACE offers its official recognition through the annual Honors and Awards process, which culminates at the national conference.

One of my bright ideas while working at the NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development won a NACE Excellence Award in 2007.  The Wasserman team’s Business Boot Camp for Liberal Arts Students, sponsored by Morgan Stanley, was an exciting program to work on, and it addressed a big need at the time among NYU liberal arts majors who wanted to explore business careers.  We were presented with the award at the New York City NACE Conference (Home field advantage blah blah blah!).  It was truly a proud moment for us all.  There were some nice bonuses as well: recognition on campus by our division colleagues, another selling point to employers regarding partnering with our office, a notation of success on one’s resume for future reference, and awareness of a best practice to discuss with other career services professionals at colleges across the country.

At the most recent NACE Conference, my Yeshiva colleagues and I were finalists for an award for our Women in Business Initiative.  We actually did not expect anything more than being nominated (Hope for the best. Expect the worst!).  When we did not hear our name announced by the dapper emcee, Andrew Ceperley, we took it all in stride and applauded the victor as Jamie Belinne, University of Houston, C.T. Bauer College of Business, strode upon the stage to receive her well-deserved kudos for Career Assessment for Business Students With Diverse Multicultural Backgrounds.

Prior to the awards gathering, for the first time ever, there was an awards showcase. What a great idea, NACE! Akin to what many of us have experienced at a job fair, all of the college and employer finalists were assembled at tables to speak to other NACE Conference attendees about their nominated programs and ideas. The room was buzzing with questions, discussions, and laughter as well. To me, that event eclipsed the awards assembly to come (Maybe, if we won, I would be singing a different tune…nah!). Coming back to Yeshiva, being a finalist was fine in my book.  On our small college campus, people were thrilled with our national recognition and the NACE honor certainly brought an additional air of legitimacy to our shop both on campus and in the eyes of important external stakeholders. Winning! Did I really just do a callback to Charlie Sheen’s oddity phase? Sorry.

This year, I am thrilled to be co-chair of the Honors and Awards Committee.  It has been wonderful working with my colleague Blake Witters and NACE’s very own Cecelia Nader, along with the entire H&A Committee, to refresh the way we look at this topic and present it at the annual conference. Having Dan Black, NACE President and part-time stand-up comic, in our corner is extremely helpful as well.

I cannot encourage you enough to submit something this year. Not only is it always worth a shot, but there are benefits no matter what. Even if you simply submit and don’t get selected, the submission itself allows for self-reflection and the chance to pat yourselves on the back.  And you never know—you might end up on stage with Dan Black in front of 2,000 of your closest career services and employer friends having a grand time in San Antonio!

The January 31 deadline is rapidly approaching. To get the ball rolling, please visit the NACE website at: http://naceweb.org/about-us/awards.aspx?mainindex-recslide3-awrds-01032014.

As Ed McMahon used to say, “You could be a winner.”  Publishers Clearinghouse? Star Search? Anyone? Bueller? Bueller?

Resume Ramblings: The Objective

Marc Goldman, Executive Director, Career Center, Yeshiva University

Marc Goldman, Executive Director, Career Center, Yeshiva University
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/marcjgoldman Twitter: @MarcGoldmanNYC

Throughout my 20-year career in this business, I have reviewed more than my share of student and alumni resumes.  At the beginning of my career, an objective statement was a fairly common element on resumes and one suggested by many career counselors.  Over the past two decades, I have heard great debate over this brief introductory statement.  And today, it is viewed by some as the appendix (non-vital organ reference) of the resume.  Some counselors and employers opine that it should never be included.  Others say it can still be helpful to the job seeker to kick off their application document.  And of course, the more astute professionals (or fellow alumni of my Psych 101 course at Cornell), will put forth, “It depends.”

Here at Yeshiva University, my team has volleyed this bouncing ball of confusion back and forth many times.  We decided to take it to the street, so to speak, and survey some of our partner employers to solve this elusive mystery once and for all.  What did we learn from this quickie survey of a small sampling of employers?

  • 43 percent responded that they are fine with an objective that is a one-line statement of the targeted goal of the resume
  • 11 percent responded that they are fine with an objective that is a longer statement including specific candidate qualifications
  • 18 percent responded that they are fine with an objective that is more of a detailed summary of the resume
  • 27 percent responded that they did not want to see an objective on a resume at all

Basically, we noted a diversity of opinions in our survey results, which mirror the myriad views on the subject I have encountered over time.  Where do I stand at this point in my career?  No more stalling, Goldman.  Fess up and proclaim to the World Wide Web your thoughts on the objective.  Here goes nothing…

The objective is – wait for it – OPTIONAL.  I have always believed that and still do to this day.  There are situations when it can be helpful and effective for an applicant, and there are times when it is useless and pure fluff.  Here are a few points related to my philosophy on this “important” topic:

1)      An objective can provide a resume with direction when it might not otherwise have a clear one.

2)      An objective can note the target of a career transition when the resume content only details transferable skills from indirectly related experience.

3)      An objective can help the student with extremely limited experience demonstrate a goal in mind to prospective employers.

4)      An objective can provide the introduction you need when a contact is passing along your resume as a referral to another contact and so on and so on.  Did I just date myself with this obscure shampoo commercial reference?

5)      An objective is unnecessary when there is a strong clear theme to one’s resume.

6)      An objective is unnecessary when you are sending a cover letter in which you discuss your intentions as an applicant.  (Alas, the devil’s advocate in me voices the opinion that many employers don’t read the cover letter, so maybe an objective is still needed.  Ah, the cover letter.  A tale for another blog entry!)

7)      IF an objective is used on the resume, please be specific.  I actually saw one recently that I shall paraphrase as the following, “Looking for a position in the working field.”  Okay, that’s a bit extreme, but you get my meaning.

What does all of this signify in the greater job search scheme of things?  Will the objective or absence of one make or break one’s shot at that dream opportunity?  All I can tell you is that the objective is something quite subjective.