About keevergroup

Founded in 1992 by Sue Keever Watts, the Keever Group is a workforce consulting company specializing in creating programs to recruit, train and retain talented professionals. Clients of the Keever Group include global companies representing most major industries. Sue has created, implemented and managed programs in North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Sue started the Keever Group with a goal of creating lasting client relationships. The focus of the company is to build a bridge between employees, prospective employees and employers through targeted programs and effective communications. Sue is a frequent speaker at regional and national human resources conferences. Her work, on behalf of clients, has earned her many awards including "Best Research," Best Interactive Communications," and "Best Recruitment Campaign".

Why Not You?

sue-keever-wattsSue Keever Watts
Owner, The Keever Group
Blog: http://keevergroup.wordpress.com/
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/sue-keever-watts/0/aa/b60
Twitter: @SueKeever

It doesn’t matter if you’re black, white, Latino, Asian…it doesn’t matter if you’re 5’11″.  It’s the heart that you bring.”  Russell Wilson, Seattle Seahawks Quarterback

Russell Wilson, quarterback of the Super Bowl winning Seahawks has had his detractors.  squareThe 5’11’ QB was a third-round-draft-pick whose 2013 salary was less than what his Super Bowl opponent, Peyton Manning, makes per game.   He shouldn’t have won the Super Bowl.  In fact, he shouldn’t have even played in the Super Bowl.

When asked how he accomplished such a feat, Wilson said that when he was young, his father would tap him on the shoulder and say, “Russ, why not you?” Those four words became his mantra and his message to the Seahawks team.

We’ve all had set backs, we all have detractors, and we all have bouts of self-doubt. The winning combination is to be someone who’s confronted adversity and remained hopeful.  As Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “We must accept finite disappointment, but never lose infinite hope.”

In my experience as an executive coach, hope is one of the greatest indicators of personal success. Hope gives you the inspiration to move out of your comfort zone and aim for something better. Hope isn’t a rose-colored lens that projects limitless optimism. It’s a gut-felt confidence that no matter what happens, you have what it takes to pull through. It frees you to make difficult decisions and to aim for something far out of reach.

Russell Wilson is a great reminder that against overwhelming odds and an ocean of cynics, hope survives.

If he can do it, why can’t you?

Let’s Be Real

sue-keever-wattsSue Keever Watts, owner, The Keever Group
Blog: http://keevergroup.wordpress.com/
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/sue-keever-watts/0/aa/b60
Twitter: @SueKeever

I began my career in public relations and learned the fine art of “packaging” content. My friends still tease me about my ability to take negative information and turn it into a tidy, if not murky, message. “I hit your car” turns into “While the circumstances of our meeting are less than ideal, I’m so glad we had the opportunity to share our contact information.”

I got out of PR as quickly as I could, but I still recognize BS (business-speak) when I hear it. Unfortunately, most companies still use business-speak on their websites, in presentations, and even during one-on-one discussions with students.  It’s the number one reason why candidates look outside an organization to find out what’s really going on inside of it.

Recently a new radio station was launched in the Dallas area. It was named the best radio station in the city and when I tuned in, found that the reception was a little dicey. I turn it on occasionally and when I tuned in yesterday, I heard the announcer say, “KHYI – if you can’t hear us, then move!” No apologies, no BS – just the truth, but in a humorous way.

A few years ago, I worked with a company that was in the middle of fall recruiting when their CEO announced that the company was being bought. Recruiters wanted to know if they should discuss the merger and how to respond to student questions. The answer was simple. Yes. Bring it up to students, professors, career services and all of your campus contacts because I can assure you that your competitors will be using it to their advantage. Be honest. Avoid using packaged responses. Tell them what you know and admit what you don’t. Showing a canned video from the CEO about the merger won’t cut it. The best way to deliver difficult information is in person.

Keep in mind that you still need to give students a compelling reason to join your organization. Part of that involves giving them the language they need to explain why they accepted an offer with an organization in transition to their parents and friends.  You’ll also need to be prepared to answer the following questions:

  1. What will change and what will stay the same?
  2. Will there be a shakeup of leadership?
  3. Why did the organization decide to merge?
  4. What’s the upside of joining the organization now?
  5. If I join the organization, is there a chance I’ll be laid off after the merger?
  6. Will you be able to keep your job?
  7. Is there a chance that my position, reporting structure or responsibilities will change after the merger?
  8. Will my benefits package, compensation and training/development be impacted (negatively or positively)?

Feel free to use humor or to speak candidly about why you’re staying with the organization. But, whatever you do, leave the BS out of it.