How Do You Handle Student LinkedIn Invitations?

Chaim Shapiro

Chaim Shapiro
Website: http://chaimshapiro.com/
Twitter: @chaimshapiro
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chaimshapiro

I wanted to invite you into a Twitter discussion I was having about an issue that most career services professionals have probably had to deal with this at some point: How do you handle LinkedIn connection requests from students?

To me, the fundamental question comes down to whether a LinkedIn connection to a career services professional provides a real added benefit to students.  If it does, then I would argue that benefit MUST be extended (or denied) equally to ALL students.  If it doesn’t, then it is simply a matter of personal preference.

How do YOU handle student LinkedIn invites?  Please vote in the Flash Poll!  Disagree with my analysis? Please share your thoughts in the comments section!

 

 

Chaim Shapiro

Black Friday…In April?

Chaim Shapiro

Chaim Shapiro
http://chaimshapiro.com/
http://www.linkedin.com/in/chaimshapiro
https://twitter.com/chaimshapiro

I know what you are thinking. It is finally April and that means baseball, warmer weather, taxes, and Black Friday.

Black Friday? No. You are not having a flashback to packed stores and stampedes the day after Thanksgiving and this isn’t an April Fool’s joke. I am talking about the #NACEBlackFriday chat with NACE President Dan Black scheduled for Friday, April 4th from 1-2 p.m. (ET) on Twitter.

Once again, Dan will lend his ears—and his last name—to a Twitter chat about all things NACE. Do you have questions or ideas? Are there any thoughts that you want to share about the conference or the future of the profession? This is your chance to bring them right to the top!

This time, you can e-mail your questions in advance to callen@naceweb.org or just show up and surprise Dan during the open forum portion of the chat (any guesses as to what I plan to do?).

So pull out that extra Black-Friday-Sale iPad you didn’t need and some of the  left-over turkey you don’t want to admit is still hiding in the back of your freezer and join us for #NACEBlackFriday because there are only  268 shopping days until Christmas (and 259 until Chanukah)!

 

 

100 Days Until #NACE14!

Chaim ShapiroChaim Shapiro
Website: http://chaimshapiro.com/
Twitter: @chaimshapiro
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chaimshapiro

People seem to like even numbers. Logically, there is no reason why people feel a stronger connection to 100 versus 99 or 101, but no matter, because today marks 100 days until the NACE 2014 Conference in San Antonio.  If you are like me, you already have your countdown timer set (see here: http://bit.ly/NACE14_Countdown ) but, if you haven’t, what are you waiting for?

The conference is YOUR opportunity to take an active role in charting the future of our profession.  It is your chance to engage and provide your feedback on all the major issues facing our profession (someone once made a GREAT video about that: http://youtu.be/wT1hxrz64R4).  There is also NO better time to meet your colleagues than at the conference.  It is the BEST networking event of the year. You can look for me, I will be wearing a VERY special hat in honor of my workshop: “Be the Davy Crockett of the LinkedIn Frontier! (My workshop focuses on what you need to know to empower your students to harness the full power of LinkedIn. Learn the inside tricks and tips to identify and engage decision makers who can act as the crucial link to sourcing and employment opportunities for your students.)

You might not want to tell your boss, but having attended numerous conferences, I can also attest that they are a LOT of fun, and there are plenty of opportunities to take in the local sights (although I hope my Chicago Blackhawks will be back in the Stanley Cup Championship, keeping me tethered to the TV at night).

The Early Bird Special ends on March 1.  February is that sneaky month with 28 days, so remember that March 1 is tomorrow!  Remember the Alamo and sign up today! http://naceweb.org/ConferenceExpo/register.htm

Life Lessons From the Chicago Cubs

Chaim ShapiroChaim Shapiro
Website: http://chaimshapiro.com/
Twitter: @chaimshapiro
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chaimshapiro

February 13, 2014 probably doesn’t mean much to most people, but to die-hard Chicago Cubs fans like me, it is one of the most important days of the year.  Pitchers and catchers report for their first day of Cubs spring training camp today.

“People often laugh at the hapless Cubs—not to mention their fans. The Cubs, often dubbed as the “lovable losers” have not won a World Series in 105 years—not since 1908 (as the joke goes in Chicago, any team can have a bad century).”

No, they aren’t picked to be a contender, and I have been predicting a championship EVERY year for the last 37 years, but I am going to put my heart and soul into rooting for them once again (I am sorry, Dan Black, I have NO compassion for Yankees fans who are worried about not making the playoffs).

Disappointment is a fact of life to Cubs fans, and yet, every year, without fail, we bounce back (after short recriminations about Billy Goat curses and Steve Bartman), relishing the new opportunity of a fresh season.  We have been dealt crushing blows in 2003 and 1984 (and 1969 for those who are old enough to remember), yet we always bounce back the following year with the same level of optimism.

I would argue that there is an important life lesson to be learned from Cubs fans.  We have all been disappointed. We have all put in the time and effort only to see a project or an idea fail. The real question is what you do next? Do you give up or do you rededicate yourself to achieving your goal?  After you fail, do you put the same time, effort, and passion into your next attempt? If you don’t you have a LOT to learn from the “lovable losers” and their fans, because I guarantee  you after 105 years of team and 36 seasons of personal heartbreak and disappointment, without a doubt, 2014 is Anno Catuli, (Latin for Year of the Cub)!

Tweet With Dan Black on NACE Black Friday

Chaim ShapiroChaim Shapiro
Website: http://chaimshapiro.com/
Twitter: @chaimshapiro
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chaimshapiro

It is the last week in November and Thanksgiving is on everyone’s mind.  This really is the quintessential American holiday.  My wife is already busy cooking up a storm for all of our guests for our first Thanksgiving in our new house.  I have assumed my usual role – staying out of the way and trying not ruin (or eat) any of the food (if Charlie Brown needs a meal, I CAN make some VERY good air-popped popcorn).

Black Friday IS famous for it opportunities to get those things you have always wanted, from HDTV’s to fancy clothes hangers (also known as exercise machines).

There is a lot of talk this year about the creeping “Black Friday.”  As I understand it some people seem very upset that retailers are opening early and conflicting with the ancient rituals of the day-like NFL football.  

Fear not, NACE is going to have a Black Friday of its own this year. Fortunately, you won’t have to run out in the cold, or leave the Thanksgiving Dinner cleanup to someone else to participate  You see, NACE Black Friday is a Twitter Chat on Friday, December 6th from 2-4 PM ET with the aptly named President of NACE, Dan Black at #NACEBlackFriday.

If there is anything you have wanted to know about NACE, but were afraid to ask, this is your chance! I can personally attest that NACE is very receptive to member feedback, and Dan has made member engagement a high priority for the year. So please, come with your questions and your suggestions.  This is your chance to become more active and take whatever is on your mind straight to the top!

So grab whatever iteration of turkey leftovers you may still have (how come there is never pumpkin pie leftover?) and join #NACEBlackFriday.  No. You won’t get an HDTV, but your $.02 will never go further to help chart the future of NACE. Perhaps you can even start with a suggestion as to what to call this event next year when President-Elect Sam Ratcliffe is in charge!

All kidding aside and in the spirit of Thanksgiving, I do want to express my thanks to the NACE staff.  It has been a true honor for me to take a more active role in NACE the last couple of years, and  have been fortunate enough to see the dedication and professionalism of the NACE staff first hand.  Their hard work makes all of the things we take for granted from NACE come to fruition.  Everyone in our profession owes them our sincere thanks!

When Does “X” Mark the Spot?

Chaim ShapiroChaim Shapiro
Website: http://chaimshapiro.com/
Twitter: @chaimshapiro
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chaimshapiro

It is simply untrue, I remember thinking in my graduate school class—more years ago than I care to admit (Jim Leyritz hit a HUGE Home Run for the Yankees in the World Series that year).  All that talk about Generation X and all those things that allegedly described me.

Yes. I did like Speed Racer, but I was convinced that was because Speed’s little brother Spritle and their pet chimp wore, what I thought were yarmulkes. However, just about everything else that was presented as fact about Gen X, simply did not resemble me in any way.

I was at a NACE FACE2FACE in New York a couple of years ago and we were discussing the concept of “Millennials” when a Millennial at my table turned to me and said that he felt like he had just been stereotyped. I told him to mention that to the larger group, but he declined. (So much for the need to be heard!)

Why has the very basic idea of viewing people as individuals, based on his/her own merits and demerits become so hard to understand? People often respond that “theory” is not meant to apply to individuals, and the purpose of generational theory is to provide context to a large group of people.

Of course marketing companies apply “theory” all of the time. (If you want an example Google “Thanksgivikkua.”)  Creating recruitment campaigns and designing programs based on a model does make sense in theory, although it is important to note that placing people into arbitrary groups has not worked out very well over the course of human history.

The real danger is applying generalities to any particular individual.  As much as we like to say we know that theory doesn’t apply to individuals, it becomes hard to see people for who they are whenever we have convenient labels.  It is just too easy to miss the person for the preconceived notion.

We also have to wonder, in a practical sense, how we view that one person who doesn’t fit into our Millennial-based programming? I fear that we may see something wrong with him/her even though their skill set is exactly what we would have wanted if we had applied a different generational label.

To paraphrase Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King, I would like a society where people are NOT judged by the era of their birth (I was born in the early 1970’s—just LOOK at the clothes I grew up wearing), but by the content of their character.

I know this perspective is not particularly popular, but I am a risk taker, after all, I DID send my penny to Columbia House for 11 cassette tapes…