The Assessment Diaries: The Mystery of the Resume Writing Assessment (Part 2)

Desalina Allen

Desalina Allen, Senior Assistant Director at NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development
Twitter: @DesalinaAllen
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/desalina

When we last left off, you were shocked at the fact that your post-resume writing seminar survey results could have been so misleading.  Students reported to have learned the basics of resume writing but, when you followed up with an in-person meeting with one of your attendees, it was obvious that the tips and guidelines you provided were not applied.

Have you ever created or taken a survey with a question or questions like the ones below?

This seminar improved my understanding of resume writing basics:
Strongly Disagree/Disagree/Neutral/Agree/Strongly Agree

I learned something from this seminar:
True/False

As a result of this seminar, I now understand what employers look for in a resume:
Strongly Disagree/Disagree/Neutral/Agree/Strongly Agree

What is the problem here?  Well, if you are simply looking for evidence that students believe they have learned something from your event there is no problem at all.  But, if you are trying to collect evidence that students actually learned something well then …..

Why? Because studies show* that students are not able to accurately measure their own growth or learning.  Not only do they incorrectly estimate growth, they tend to overestimate it.  It makes sense, right? If someone asks you after a presentation or a class if you learned something, how do you really know if you did?  

As a result of this, we cannot use students’ self-reported growth as evidence of growth.  Instead, we have to utilize other assessment methods to really prove they learned something.  How? By doing a pre- and post-assessment of student knowledge (like I did for our etiquette dinner) and comparing results, or coming up with a standardized way to evaluate resumes (via a rubric) and look at the change over time.

Last year, one of our learning goals was to ensure that students were learning career- related skills like resume writing.  We did away with our post seminar surveys and instead created resume rubrics to use with students.  I’ll be sharing that experience in my next few posts, along with helpful resources if your office is look to create your own resume rubrics!
*Thank you to Sonia DeLuca Fernandez, our Director of Research and Assessment for Student Affairs, for this article that can be found in Research and Practice in Assessment, Volume 8.

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