The Next Recruitment and Retention Strategy: Bring Your Parents to Work Day?

kevin grubbA post by NACE Ambassador Kevin Grubb
Assistant Director at Villanova University’s Career Center.
Twitter: @kevincgrubb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevingrubb
Blog: “social @ edu”.

Phil Dunphy, the ultimate peerent

“Modern Family” star Ty Burrell plays the ultimate peerent, Phil Dunphy.

 

There was “bring your daughter to work” day. There was “bring your dog to work” day (and, for many employers, dogs are welcome all the time). Now, “bring your parents to work” day? Yes, as noted in a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, “Should You Bring Mom and Dad to the Office?” Some employers are already doing it. I can’t help but immediately think of Phil Dunphy of Modern Family fame, a strong advocate for “peerenting,” who would probably love this in a hilarious, awkward and endearing kind of way that only he could.

Numerous generational experts and studies have noted that Millennials, the college students of today, have a much closer relationship with their parents than generations past. Anecdotes supporting this are easy to find. Why the change? Often cited reasons are new technology keeping the generations in constant communication mixed with the conventional parenting wisdom of the generation prior. Whatever the cause, some employers, like Google, Northwestern Mutual and PwC, are embracing this shift. All three are mentioned in the WSJ article and are employing strategies to thoughtfully involve parents in the work environments of their employees.

Parental involvement in the career development and recruiting process needs to be carefully handled, to say the least. As a Millennial in this field, articles like this especially make me reflect. I thought of the following:

Situations where things could get difficult with parental involvement:

  1. Bringing parents to a career fair or networking event. Even though everyone might have the best intentions in mind, adding a parent to the dynamic of the conversation could get complicated.
  2. Parents sitting in on an interview. Same as above.
  3. Parents negotiating offers for candidates. As Jaime Fall, Vice President of the HR Policy Association, notes in the article, there could be privacy issues that prevent employers from sharing offer information with parents.

Situations where I think parental involvement could be great:

  1. Candidates asking parents for advice about a career transition. Very few people have quite the long-range view of an individual like parents do, and they, being a generation older, may provide some useful insight.
  2. Employees bringing parents to a work function that, for whatever reason, encouraged invitations to parents and/or family. If: (a) it is part of the culture and (b) the employees can trust themselves and their parents to act appropriately and respect boundaries, then I think this could be fun.

What do you think, NACE blog readers? Are we going to see more “Bring Your Parents to Work” days?

Image source: screenshot from YouTube

The Assessment Diaries: It’s Not Just Data

Desalina Allen

A post by NACE Guest Blogger, Desalina Allen, Senior Assistant Director at NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development
Twitter: @DesalinaAllen
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/desalina

 

I have to admit that I’m pretty left brained when it comes to my work.  In fact, the thought of spending a quiet afternoon in front of Microsoft Excel, coffee in-hand, warms my heart (did I mention that I love coffee?).

photo credit: Shereen M via photopincc

It’s for that reason that when I first started learning about assessment I often equated it with data collection – as I’m sure many others do as well. Don’t get me wrong, it’s important to know how many and what types of students are using your services.  But, in addition to those metrics, it’s also valuable to think about demonstrating your offices’ success using qualitative information. Like J.K. Rowling said, “there’s always room for a story that can transport people to another place,” and who wouldn’t want advice from someone who lives in a house like this:

So what exactly is qualitative information? Basically, anything other than numerical data. It’s been on my mind because it seems that lately we have received quite a few requests for student success stories.  This isn’t surprising – stories supplement, support and strengthen the metrics we already share – and, unlike me, not everyone finds joy in looking at pie charts all day.

photo credit: mark.groves via photopin cc

Here are some examples of ways you can collect and organize qualitative information and how these methods support your assessment objectives:

  • Focus Groups or Advisory Boards:  These two methods are great ways to better understand your students’ needs.  They function well if you’ve sent out a survey and want help explaining some of the findings or if you feel (like many of us do) that your students are suffering from survey fatigue and won’t respond to one more request.  Focus groups tend to be groups brought together one time around a specific topic whereas advisory boards could meet throughout the academic year.  In both cases, be thoughtful about who you invite to the table (Do you want students from a particular background or school? Is it open to everyone or might you want to conduct interviews first?).  You’ll also want to think critically about who should be facilitating.  Consider both staff members and unbiased professionals who are specially trained.  Either way, be sure to document the planning, take notes/transcribe, and be ready to plan follow-up actions based on what you learned.

  • Word Association Exercises (Pre and Post):  Have students write down or share words they associate with a particular topic before and after an event or presentation to help measure if your core message came across.  For example, in a seminar on interviewing students may start the session offering words like “scary” or “questioning” and end sharing words like “preparation,” “practice” or “conversation.”  Keep track of the terms shared and use an application like wordle to look at the pre and post results side-by-side.

  • Observation:  You don’t need to bring in a team of consultants every time you need an external perspective.  Consider asking a trusted career services professional to attend your career fair, observe a workshop or review your employer services offerings and provide written feedback and suggestions. Offer your expertise on another topic to avoid paying a fee.  Keep notes on changes you have implemented based on the observation.

  • Benchmarking:  There are many reasons to benchmark.  For assessment purposes knowing what other schools are doing and how they compare to you helps give others context.  Being able to say that your program is the first of it’s kind or that it’s modeled off of an award winning one developed by a colleague may make more of an impact when combined with your standard student satisfaction survey results.

  • Staff:  We all are lucky enough to receive the occasional thank you note or email from a student who has really benefited from the programs and resources provided by the career center.  Come up with a standardized way to be able to quickly track those students.  It could be something as easy as a document on a shared drive or even a flag in your student management system.  Be sure to ask students’ permission, saying something like, “I’m so happy to hear our mock interview meeting helped you land that internship!  We are always looking for students who are willing to share their positive experiences, would you be comfortable sharing this information in the future should we receive a request?”

I’m sure there are many more ways to collect this type of information – please leave your questions and share your own experiences below!

The Importance of Real Life Connections in Recruiting

kevin grubbA post by NACE Ambassador Kevin Grubb
Assistant Director at Villanova University’s Career Center.
Twitter: @kevincgrubb
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevingrubb
Blog: “social @ edu”.

In my role at Villanova University’s Career Center, I have the altogether stressful yet enormously satisfying duty of planning our university-wide career fairs on campus.  We wrapped up our first of these earlier in September, and after all the resumes were filed Handshakes: a real life connectionand business cards exchanged, I got to thinking about why events like these are so important.  Our motto for this year’s fairs is “Real Life Connections, Real World Opportunities,” and I think that phrase says it all for me.

I mentioned in a post from the conference that I am a Millennial; part of the “tech-obsessed” and “wildly ambitious” generation that wants to wear flip-flops to work (for the record, I much prefer boat shoes to flip flops, and I’m a fan of professional dress).  I think social media is a great way to communicate, Google Hangouts are amazing and I am blown away by what we can do with virtual meetings, conferences and career fairs.  But, still, there’s nothing better to me than doing something or meeting someone in real life, or “IRL” as I’d say on Twitter.  I think this is key in recruiting, too.

Why do the “real life connections” matter?  Here’s what I’ve come up with:

1.) A 2010 New York Times article, “Evidence That Little Touches Do Mean So Much,” mentions numerous studies which demonstrate that physical touch “can lead to clear, almost immediate changes in how people think and behave.”  As we all know, how one appears and sounds are important.  But, that all-important handshake at a networking event is truly all-important.  The physical touch adds another dimension to the communication.

2.) Meeting in real life can inspire more trust between people, one Forbes columnist found in her own research.  It seems there’s something about bringing the connection to life, real life, that makes people more generous toward each other.  I remember when I had my first real “tweetup.”  In 2009, I met Shannon Kelly on Twitter.  We were both running social media accounts for our career centers, and frankly, we were trying to figure out how to make it all work.  We stayed in touch, and eventually I met her in her office at Penn Career Services in 2010.  Did it make me trust her more?  Though I wasn’t measuring that at the time, I believe it did.  It was a step in building a connection and resulting friendship that I value very much now.  Similarly, I see the excitement in students as they get the opportunity to meet with recruiters and professionals after reading about them online.

3.) Sometimes, things you wear or carry are key conversation starters.  An Inc Magazine author commented on the fact that a pink faux ostrich bag she bought has brought her several compliments and started conversations with people.  I doubt that pink faux ostrich would ever look good on me, but I can certainly say that I’ve been surprised when people have commented on my new shoes, new pants, lunch bags, etc. when I had no intention of making a statement with them.  Details like these just might not be captured virtually. There’s another benefit to meeting in person.

Technology is incredible.  Virtual meetings are great.  But, when it comes to making a connection, nothing beats real life.  What do you think, NACE blog readers?

The Importance of Social Media and Measuring ROI in Career Services Practices

Heather TranenA post by Guest Blogger, Heather Tranen
Associate Director, Global Communications & Strategic Outreach, NYU Wasserman Center for Career Development
Twitter: @htranen
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/heathertranen

 

 

Social media continues to grow in scope and power. There are so many platforms out there, and our students are all over them. To this generation, it’s almost as if things don’t actually happen unless they are filming, photographing, tweeting or status updating it.Screen Shot 2013-09-18 at 7.40.15 PM.png

Gen Y overshares and hyperconsumes content in the online space. They feel like things aren’t actually happening unless it’s happening on social media.

“They take technology for granted. They live through social media. They want the world their way, and they want it now.” – Forbs on Gen Y

As career services professionals, we need to navigate our communication strategies to both speak their language, and teach them to become fluent in the language of the professional world. Through social media, we can engage students in the space they are comfortable with, and then lure them into our office to connect to the tangible resources they need to be successful after college – a bait and switch of sorts.

These days, most understand that social media is here to stay. However, whether or not there is value in it remains questionable by many. Therefore, measuring ROI is crucial. Knowing the difference between vanity and actionable metrics is extremely important!

Vanity Metrics: It’s always nice to have a large following and fans to make us feel super important and liked. These vanity metrics are often how supervisors judge whether we are doing a good job. Yes, these are important. However, who are these individuals following or liking us? Are they strangers, or actually connections who are engaging and utilizing our resources?

Actionable Metrics: What really matters is whether our campaign translated into “performance” outcomes. Who retweeted us, who became more aware of our resources and came to the office to utilize them? These are the questions we should all ask when engaging with students in the social media space.

Metrics and ROI are becoming increasingly important in higher education.  I recommend looking at platforms like Hootsuite, Twitonomy, Klout, and Facebook admin pages to help you gather a valuable measurement of your engagement in the online space. Correlating the timing of your social media messaging with spikes in attendance or counseling requests also serves as a more abstract way of showing the impact of your social media practices, and proving you are social media all-stars!